(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Old Eliot : a monthly magazine of the history and biography of the Upper Parish of Kittery, now Eliot"

REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



\i 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01742 8928 




^ 






I 



OLD ELIOT. 



A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 

OF THE HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY OF 

THE UPPER PARISH 

OF KITTERY NOW ELIOT. 



VOLUME IX. 

1909. 



J. L. M. WILLIS, M. D., Editor. 



Historical Prsss. 

Eliot, Maine. 

Augustine Caldwell, Printer. 

1909. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/oldeliotmonthlym1909elio 



Corrections 



Page 41, line 3, read Mary F. 

60, January 8, read Shorey. 

6o, June 5, read Daniel R. Sally J. 

60, No\ T 'r 23, read Sophers. 

62, line 6, read Alice Spinney. 

62, December 23, read Paulina. 

63, June 15, read Olive Raitt. 

64, Nov'r 20, read Abram C. 

65, March 15. read Corke. 

65, Oct'r 30, read James S. 

66, December iT, t read James K. Paul- 

67, Nov'r 24, read Wilkerson. 

68, January 13, read Daniel. 

70, February 26, read Junkins. 

71, September 24, read Freeman. 

73, November 25. read Mary 2. 

74, April 24, read Mrs. Pisidia Leach. 
74, October 18, read 1843. 

74, Ooctober 23, read Manson. 
77, August 3, read Morris. 

79, November 20, read Kenniston. 

79, December 4, read Kinnin. 

80, May 5, read Keinear. 

81, October 14, read Eliza. 
84, May iS, read Annie. 

87, Augusc 13, read Cutts. 

88, May 6, read Francis. 

88, September 29, read Alpheus H. 
92, September 29, read Downing. 

95, April 24. read Charles C. 

75, Sept. 6, read Merrow. 

96, September 15, read Herman. 
98, August 15, read Cole. 

9S, September 14, read Urch, 
123, line 1, read: Fort. 
J35, line 18, read Adrian. 

139, line 21, read Cedars. 

140, lint 3, read George Rogers, in place of 

Peter Staples. 
143, line 10, read Long Reach. 
149, line 12, read Mast. 
164, line 7, read New Castle. 
jSi, 10 (up) read Cammock. 
216, August 6, read George Spinney. 






V* 



m 



OLD ELIOT. 

Dr. J. L. M. WILLIS, Editor. 



VOL. IX. ELIOT, MAINE,— January-March, 1909. NO. I. 

The annual reunion of the Piscataqua Pioneers was 
held on Tuesday, August 25, 1908 ; several addresses of 
interest and value were given, that will revive names of 
long ago days; and add to the biography and history 
of ancient people and localities. 

The origin of the Society is given by O. P. Rernick ; 
and commends itself to all who grasp and preserve the 
traditions and memories of the yesterdays : 



Origen of the Society. Oliver P. Remicx. 

A Society for preserving the names and the deeds of 
the early settlers of the Piscataqua valley, to find and 
bring out papers, letters and maps of the region, and to 
interest their descendants, wherever they may live, in 
the same. 

Qualifications : applicant to be elected by a vote of the 
members, and to be a lineal descendant in a male or 
female line of a pioneer or other settler in the Piscataqua 
valley before July, 1776. 

The first meeting was held at Concord, N. H., 15 June, 
1905 ; and the Society was incorporated by Thomas N. 
Jackson, Brooklyn, N. Y.. John M. Moses, Strafford, 
N. H., Albert H. Lamson, Elkins, N. H., Henry W. 
Fernald, Boston, Mass., Moses A. Safford, Kittery, Maine. 
— All were elected Directors. 

"The following were elected Officers, to serve until the 
regular meetings : 

President, Hon. Moses A. Safford, Kittery, Maine. 

Treasurer, Henry \V. Fernald, Boston, Mass. 

Secretary, Albert i„. Lamson, Elkins, N. H. 



¥ 



2. - PISCATAOUA PIONEERS. 

The first annual meeting was held at Portsmouth, N. H 
on the 22d of August, 1905 ; when bylaws were adopted, 
and the foregoing Officers and Directors were elected to 
serve for one year. 

The second annual meeting was held at Portsmouth. 
N.H., on the 31st August, 1906, and officers electei as 
follows : 

President, Henry W. Hardon, New York City. 
Vice Presidents, John M. Moses, Horace Mitch.dl 

Alexander Dennett, Oliver L. Frisbee, 
A. A. Folsom, J. L. M. Willis, M. D. 
Alice J. Moore, Florence A- Crane. 
Treasurer, Alexander Dennett. 
Secretary and Curator, Albert H. Lamson : 
and the same Directors were all re-elected, for the year. 

The third annual meeting was held on the 20th August, 
1907, at Portsmouth, N. H.; and an interesting paper 0:1 
Locations in Portsmouth, was read by John M Moses of 
Strafford, N. H. The following were elected officers for 
the year 1907-8 : — 

President, Lieut. Oliver P. Remick, U. S. R. C. S. 

retired, Kittery, Maine ; 
Vice Presidents, Messrs Moses, Mitchell, Dennett, 

Frisbie, Willis, and Mrs. Moore and 
Crane, re-elected, and also Samuel L. 
Hamilton, Denison R. Slade, John 
Scales and Miss Theodora Chase. 
The Treasurer, Secretary, Curator and Board of Direc- 
tors were all re-elected, and a Committee was chosen to 
arrange for a field day at the next annual meeting, as 
follows: The President, O. P. Remick, and Messrs 
Safford, Dennett, Mitchell and Scales. 

The fourth annual meeting was held on the 25th of 
August, 190S ; the first session at Portsmouth, and im- 
mediately adjourning to the Charnpernowne Hotel, at 
Kittery Point, where the meeting was called to order by 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 3. 

the President, Oliver P, Reinick, who delivered the 
opening Address : — 

The President's Address. Oliver P. Remick. 

Members of the Piscataqua Pioneers, and Ladies and 
Gentlemen ; I welcome all of you to old Kittery, and 
hope we shall have a pleasant and profitable day. 

We have come together for our annual meeting 
and field-day, on the bank of this beautiful river, where 
our ancestors first settled over two hundred and eighty- 
five years ago ; cleared and planted cue land, — although 
the first business that engaged their attention appears to 
have been that of fishing. What a change from that day 
to the present ! 

Very near to this Hotel, [ChampernowneJ is where the 
first house was built in the present town of Kittery, about 
1630, by Alexander Shapleigh, who has many descend- 
ants living today in the valley of the Piscataqua. 

The first houses erected in the Piscataqua valley, were 
very near the water. For this reason all communication 
between the settlers was carried on by water for the first 
fifty years ; then roads, or rough paths, were constructed 
through the woods; and as they became smoother and 
better, houses were built near them, and the creeks 
deserted. 

It is well that we should honor the memories of the 
early settlers of the Piscataqua, who were mostly emi- 
grants from England. They and theii descendants helped 
greatly to make this country what it is today, — the strong- 
est and the most powerful Nation in the World. 

How man) stirring scenes have taken place on this 
old river, since the first settlement, when the Indian in 
his canoe was the only occupant ; then the great fleet of 
the Pepperels, employed in fishing and commerce to all 
parts of the world. 

Up to fifty years ago a great many of the inhabitants 
were employed in building ships and manning them for 
their various voyages. And one hundred years ago 



4. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

ships were on the stock in every town on the river from 
Kittery to Exeter. .The Falkland, the first 74 gun-ship 
built in America, was launched on this river in 1690, for 
the British Navy. 

The first settlers along the Piscataqua River, were very 
liberal and tolerant toward their neighbors and others, 
including the Indians. 

They appeared to belong to the Episcopal Church, 
mostly, as did Mason and Gorges , but soon after 1652, 
When Maine became a permanent part of Massachusetts, 
and many puritans from Boston and Salem had settled in 
the -towns, and the Congregational religion had been 
established as the State Religion, persecutions on other 
forms of religions, and troubles with the Indians, com- 
menced and continued many years. 

But even this did not satisfy the Massachusetts Gov- 
ernment ; and Town Officers were removed from office, 
and Deputies were refused their seats in the Legislature 
from this section, for the reason that they did not pros- 
ecute the Quakers and Indians. 

s Among those whom the Massachusetts authorities 
thought were too lenient, and friendly with the Quakers, 
•was Major Nicholas Shapleigh, sou oi the before men- 
tioned Alexander. He was removed from office several 
times by Massachusetts ; imprisoned and fined ^200 in 
1674. But he was a very able and conscientious man, and 
probably did as much, or more than any other man to 
advance the Piscataqua River settlements. 

He was a Councillor of the Province several years : 
County Treasurer ; Selectman of Kittery many years ; 
Deputy to- General Court ; Commander of the Maine 
Militia. He was killed at the launching of a vessel at 
Kittery Foreside, 29th of April, 16S2. 

Thomas Withers; was one of the first settlers of this 
region. He was sent over by Capt. John Mason, and 
located in this town of Kittery, where the Ferry to Potts- 
mouth is now ; having been granted about 1200 acres by 
Gorges, in the town. He was an able man, and prominent 



PISCATA£UA PIONEERS. 5. 

in the affairs of the town ; was a Selectman, Commissioner 
in 1644, Deputy to the General Court in 1656. 
He died in 1685 ; he has many descendants. 

Ambrose Gibbons was Steward of Mason's Colony. He 
first settled in Berwick, then on Sagamore Creek; but 
soon after moved to Durham, and later to Dover, where 
he ever alter lived. He was an honest, capable man, and 
knew better than Mason the needs of the settlements.— 
He held many offices, and was Governor of the Piscata- 
qua settlement. He has many descendants, among whom 
is your President. 

Time will not allow us to notice others of the first 
settlers ; but Renald fertiald, the First Surgeon of the 
Piscataqua Settlement should be mentioned : — 

He came over with Mason's company, and located in 
Portsmouth. He was one of the principal men of Ports- 
mouth ; and he and his four sons were granted large areas 
of lands, in what is now Kittery, Eliot, Portsmouth and 
New Castle, including the Navy Yard Islands ; and he 
probably has more descendants who are living in the 
Piscataqua valley today, than all the rest of Mason's 
company. Many of our members are descendants from 
him, — including the Speaker. 

The early settlers of this region were very patriotic ; 
and backed up their opinions and conclusions with both 
men and money. In the first settlements there was not 
much trouble with the Indians, until King Philips war, 
1675, * n which the Piscataqua settlement suffered. 

In King William's war, — 1688 to 1699, — all the river 
towns were scenes of bloodshed and fire, from the French 
and Indians ; and the people had all they could do to 
defend their own homes. They furnished, how r ever, some 
men for Phipps' expedition, and during Queen Anne's 
war, — 1702 to 1713, — the Piscataqua settlement furnished 
many men. Also during the Indian War in Maine, 1722 
to 1726. 

In King George's war, 1744 to 1748, — with the French, 



6. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

the Piscataqua men came to the front, and in the expedi- 
tion to capture Louisburg, C. B., under Gen. Pepperell, a 
native and resident ofthis town. The towns along the 
river furnished eight hundred men; many of whom were 
killed there.' 

In the last French War, — 1754 to 1763, that destroyed 
French power on this continent, — the men of this region 
were in all the battles from New York State to Nova 
Scotia, including the capture of Quebec. 

The people of this valley were very active in their 
opposition to the Stamp and other Acts, leading up to the 
Revolution from the Mother Country ; and one of the first 
hostile acts was committed in the capture of Fort William 
and Mary at New Castle, in December. 1774. Portsmouth 
and Kittery were then the largest towns in population on 
the river, each having between 3000 and 4000 inhabitants. 
Kittery alone -furnished over seven ku?idred men and 
Portsmouth probably as many. 

You all know of the Ranger^ under Capt- Paul Jones ; 
and of her capture of the British man-of-war, Drake, near 
Ireland, in 1778. Few of you know, probably, that nearly 
all her officers and crew were from the Piscataqua valley. 
Lieut. Samuel Wallingford, the only officer killed on her 
in the battle, was a resident of So me rs worth*, and his 
ancestors were pioneers of the valley. Capt. Jones said of 
her crew of about one hundred and fifty men, that it was 
the best he was with in the Navy during the war. 

It is also not generally known, that over eighty men 
from the Piscataqua valley were on the Bon Homme 
Richard, when Capt. Paul Jones captured the Serapis, in 
1779. They filled nearly all the positions on board, from 
Master to Gunner's Mates ; and helped in no small way to 
win that great victory. Shot from the Serapis came their 
way, and about one-half their number were killed or 
wounded. 

In the army the Piscataqua men were in every battle 
from Bunker Hill to Yorktown ; and they did their duty 
well. Among them were Major General John Sullivan, 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 7. 

a native of Berwick, and General William Whipple, 
a native of Kittery, — also Governor John Langdon, 
of Portsmouth, (whose patriotic speech to the New 
Hampshire Legislature, about raising money to carry on 
the war, deserves a place with Lincoln's address at 
Gettysburg,) to the youngest drummer-boy. 

In the War of 18 12, the men from this valley were again 
on deck ; and I well remember when a boy, an old Gun- 
ner, who lived near me, who had lost a leg on the old 
Constitution, when she captured the British frigate Gurriere. 

During the four long years of Civil War of 1S61-1865, 
the Piscataqua men helped to preserve the Union their 
ancestors had helped to form. They were in every battle 
of that war, on land and sea, from Bull Run to Appomatox 
— and in nearly every battle some lives were sacrificed for 
the cause of Liberty. 

Up to the time of that war, this had been the so-called 
" Land of Liberty ;" and the-monarcha of the old world 
had Hughed at us in derision, for calling it a Land of 
Liberty with Four Millions of Slaves ! But, as a result of 
that war. Slavery was destroyed, and this country became 
a Land of Liberty in fact as well as in name. 

Over one half of the crew of the Kearsarge, when she 
sunk the Alabama, in 1864, were from this valley. They 
were also with Farragut at New Orleans and Mobile Bay. 

Time will not allow me to say more about our ancestors 
of this region. Suffice it to say that the Piscataqua men 
and women have always been in the front for making this 
country larger and better. 



After business was disposed of, the following officers 
were elected for the year, 1908-9 : — 

President, Dr. J. L. M. Willis, of Eliot, Maine; 

Vice Presidents, Messrs Moses, Mitchell, Dennett, 

Hamilton, Slade; Scales. 
Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Crane, and 
Miss Chase re-elected, also 
O. P. Remick, Oliver R Grant. . 



S r FliCATAQFA- PIONEERS, i 

The Treasurer, Secretary, Curator and Board of Direc- 
tors, — were all re-elected. 

The following Committee were elected to make arrange- 
ments for the next meeting, — Messrs Eamson, Dennett, 
Safford, Seales and Mrs. Moore. 

Mr. John M. Moses then read a paper about the Early 
Settlers of Portsmouth: 

TLxd srssimg J^BoplB jof (Earlg ^orfemouflj. 

J. M. MOSES. 

Thomas Walford was one of them. With his wife Jane, 
he came to Wiscassett, Maine, in September. 1623, with 
the Robert Gorges expedition. He soon removed to 
Charlestown, Mass., where the Puritans found him in 
1630, and expelled him for his Episcopalian tenets. 

He then removed to Portsmouth, where John Mason was 
collecting people with a preference for Episcopalians, and 
became a leading citizen. In 1640, he and Henry Sherburne 
were the wardens of the-First Episcopalian Church. 

He located at Sagamore Creek, where he had a farm of 
some two hundred acres, extending all around the head of 
the Creek, called Walford's Plantation. There was for- 
merly a landing at the junction of the brooks that form the 
Creek, later called Westbrook's landing. Stackpole and 
others have given the main facts about him ; and the pur- 
pose of this mention of him is to correct a few errors and 
state a few facts not known to be in print elsewhere. 

He died in 1666 or 1667. His wife, Jane, survived him, 
but died before Sept. 7, 1681, pretty certainly without 
having remarried. There is a deed on record that seems 
to show that she married second a Goss or Givs ; but it has 
become plain that an error must have been made iu writing 
or copying that deed. . 

For discussion of this matter see a note in Boston Tran- 
script, Sept. 30, 1907, which, although making a few slips 
in matters of facts, reaches right conclusions. Compare 
this with N. H. State Papers, Vol. 31, page 92, and with 
the will of Thomas Peverly in that volume. 



PISCATAOUA PIONEERS. 9. 



THomas Peverly married Thomas Walford's eldest 
daughter, Jane. They lived just below, on the south side 
of the Creek, their house standing near a bend on the 
Creek where it approached the upland. Thomas Peverly 
died about 1670, leaving five sons and three daughters. — 
The daughter Sarah was not mentioned in the will as 
copied in the Probate Records, but appears in the new 
printed copy made from the original. She married (1) 

Michael Hicks; and (2) Savage. The widow, 

Jane Peverly, married (2) Goss. » 

The Walford name came to an end with the third 
generation ; though a name, — Woolford, — appeared a little 
later in Greenland : Jeremiah the only son of Thomas, 
died before his father, leaving sons Thomas and Jeremiah; 
and daughters, Mary and Martha. Of the sons, Thomas 
died unmarried before 1682 ; and Jeremiah, without issue, 
about 1733. Daughter Mary married Joseph Mazeet ; 
daughter Martha married Moore. 

Richard Leader must have been another interesting 
man, though we know but little about him. He was a 
leader in fact as well as name ; a captain of industry in his 
time and place. 

He had been employed about mines in Ireland ; had 
been at the head of the Iron Works at Lynn; then came 
to Berwick and set up Sawmills that so impressed the 
people that they called the place Great Works, — a name 
which was used in the Town Records, and is still used on 
the Government Map. He was agent for John Beex & Co. 
of London. Plainly he was a doer of great works in 
mechanical lines. 

He was also a man of iufluence, with aristocratic con- 
nections, a house in Portsmouth, — being a brother-in-law 
of Richard Cutt. 

As for his descendants, the name seems to have ended 
with him and his brother George. The new volume of 
X. H. Probate Records, (State Papers 31,) makes it very 
probable that he left only two children : Elizabeth, who 



IO. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

married John Hole of Kittery, and was killed by the 
Indians, May 4, 1705, and Anne, who married Samuel 
Clark of Portsmouth, and had at least four children ; three 
of whom were living May 11, 1722. These were,— 
Margaret, who had married successively, John Jackson. 

Philip White, and Roger Swain, and had children by 

each marriage ; 
Bridget, who married Joseph Miller, mariner, and had 

children, one, a daughter, Margaret, who married 

Thomas Noble ; and — 
Sarah Clark, unmarried- 
Thomas and Margaret Noble had a son, Leader, bap- 
tized Oct. 5, 1735. 

Joseph and Anne Nelson, of Sagamore Creek, had a 
son, Leader, born Aug. 30, 1754; and he had a son, — 
Richard Leader Nelson. 

Probably they were descendants ot Richard Leader ; 
though the connection has not been proved. 

Another man, little known, but evidently a hustler in 
his day, was Matthew Nelson, (1658- 17 13.) who started 
as an apprentice to a tanner, or possibly a redemptioner in 
bound service ; and died the owner of the great Walford 
Plantation, at. Sagamore Creek, with a " Manor House," 
that is referred to in a deed. 

There is preserved in his own hand writing, a petition 
that he sent to the Court of Associates, as early as 1678 — 
He had been accused of stealing hides fiom his employer ; 
and as the latter failed to come forwaid with evidence, he 
prayed to be discharged. 

The extremely bad spelling of this paper, shows his 
lack of education ; its substance, the force of his mind. 

I have not seen the Court record that should tell how 
the case was disposed of ; but it is certain that nothing 
occurred that prevented his rapid rise to prosperity. 

His trials, however, were hot ended. Domestic ones 
were in store for him. In 1684, he and his wife Jane, 
were put under bonds to appear at Court, because Jane 
was alleged to have threatened Anne Clarke, and to have 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. II. 

sl.indered Francis Mercer. I have not read the outcome 
of these cases. 

In 1690 he had wife, Agnes ; probably Agnes Rackley, 
daughter of William Rackley, whose first wife was a 
daughter of Charles Nelson of Kittery. She was the 
mother of at least four of his six sons. 

He dealt considerably in real estate ; and in deeds was 
called "tanner." 

He died in 1713, and the plantation was divided among 
his sons*, Matthew, Joseph, William, and his son-in-law 
Nathaniel Tuckerinan, who held it while they lived. 

Joseph's son. Leader, held a part of the estate as late 
as 1774, by which time it had been mostly bought by John 
Gardner and Samuel Cate. 

Matthew .Nelson was the ancestor of nearly all the 
Portsmouth Nelsons, and those of Exeter, Barnstead and 
Gilmanton. 

Another man of earlv Portsmouth has been interestingly 
written about by Brewster and Aldrich ; and he must be 
supposed to have had qualities that laid the foundation of 
fame ; — I refer to " Dr. Joe" Moses ; about 1690-1770. 

He was not from England, as Brewster says ; he was of 
the third generation of Portsmouth Moses'. In other 
points Brewster is doubtless less accurate than interesting,* 
for his only source of information w r as the stories that had 
been handed down by tradition ; and were floating about 
Portsmouth seventy years after ''Dr. Joe's" death. 

When we consider how T much a comic story would gain 
in the course of seventy years' telling, also the tendency 
to put upon noted characters stories about others, of mere 
fiction,— it is not likely that " Dr. Joe" said or did more 
than a small fraction of the things ascribed to him. 

Such facts about him as can be gleaned from records, 
make against thinking he was of the light and low char- 
acter which is implied by Brewster, or in such extreme 
poverty as he represents. 

"' Dr. Joe's" house was indeed small, as it stood on a 
lot 32 feet by 26 feet. But so were most other houses of 



12. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

the period. Even much later Washington was not im- 
pressed with the buildings of the place. But he had a 
valuable tract of the glebe land, 146 ft. by 53 ft. in the 
centre of the city, bounded on three sides by Congress, 
Fleet and Brier streets; and he was a proprietor of Bar- 
rington. 

He gained the affection of women of character and 
social standing : of his three wives, the first was in the 
Half-way Covenant with the Chuich ; the second in full 
communion; and the third, — according to Brewster, — was 
acceptable as a teacher, after " Dr. Joe's" death. 

In 1745 he subscribed thirteen shillings for the support 
of French prisoners at Portsmouth. 

His son Samuel, (the only son known to have had sons,) 
is conceded by Brewster to have been of saintly character 
as to works, — whatever he may have been in belief and 
utterance. He "did those things which led to the spirit- 
ual good of his fellows." 

Another son, Theodore, was a ruling Elder, in the 
Independent Church, and probably a preacher. 

Both these sons petitioned, January n, 1773, against the 
establishment of Theatres. 

The later generations had a good proportion of men 
eminent for piety and probity. 

I would like to know the family of "Dr. Joe's" second 
wife, Hannah. 

The name suggests another interesting Portsmouth 
man of a century later, — Thomas P. Moses, Musician and 
Artist, — 180S-1881. He was grandson of a Thomas Moses 
whose ancestry has not been proved, but who was, per- 
haps, a grandson of Josiah Moses, who was a brother of 
" Dr. Joe," and whose wife was a daughter of Matthew 
Nelson. 

Thomas P. Moses was best known as a Musician. He 
was organist at the Middle Street Baptist, and the North 
Congregational Churches ; and the principal piano teacher 
of the place. 

In the latter part of his life he did some very good 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 13. 

painting. Also, he wrote a curious book; containing a 
sketch of his life, and other matter, more or less eccentric, 
in prose and poetry, but exhibiting literary genius. 

A genius he certainly was', with a considerable burden 
of the infirmities of genius. His ardent temperament 
carried him to unprofitable lengths in the development of 
his ideas ; he did not make it a financial success in life. 

It also made him warm friendship and bitter enemies; 
but he was an artist from the word Go t — thoroughly de- 
voted to any artistic undertaking. 

He conducted concerts, sparing no pains to make them 
of the highest artistic merit, regardless of profit; and did 
much to improve musical taste and expression in his 
native city. 

Strafford, N. H. August, 1908. 



Lieut. Alexander Dennett, U. S. R. C. S.", retired, then 
read a piper, accompanied by old documents and deeds, 
about the early Dennett settleis of the Piscataqua valley, 
as follows : — 

®I;b (Early *Bmmil mltltxz. 

ALEXANDER DENNETT, of Kittery, 

In the year 1668, two young men landed at Portsmouth, 
from England, to try their fortunes in the New World. — 
The younger of the two, John Dennet, must have been 
about twenty-two or twenty-three years old. His brother, 
Alexander, was five or six years older. By trade or 
occupation they were house carpenters. On arrival they 
probably began work at once at their trade. 

May 15, 1672, John Dennet, by taking the oath, became 
a freeman. 

Fiom early records and traditions, it appears that he 
very soon became prominent in town affairs, exerting a 
wide influence in the community in which he lived ; pro- 
moting the material prosperity of the town. He was dis- 
tinguished for his sterling integrity and untiring industry, 
holding many positions of trust and responsibility, fulfil- 



14. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS, 

it 

iug every obligation with fidelity. During the latter part 
of his life he became wealthy for those days ; being the 
largest tax-payer in the town at the time of his death. 

He owned a great deal ot real estate, including 1320 
feet on the west side of Mill Creek or North Mill Pond. 

In 1680 he built the old De?mct House, (at one time 
known as the l * Bee Hive,") still standing on Prospect 
street, fronting on Dennett street which was named for 
him. The dwelling was constructed in a substantial man- 
ner ; the lower part being built throughout of square 
timbers. 

From Brewster's Rambles About Portsmouth, first series, 
page 345, we learn the following about Lydia Waterhouse 
Colby Dennet Plummer ; — 

"One of the, shipmasters employed by Sir William 
Pepperrell was Capt Colby, who married Lydia Water- 
house. More than ninety years ago [written i860,] she 
became a widow, and was married to Epbraim Dennett, 
and resided at the above old mansion, (old Dennet house, ) 
on Christian Shore. Years rolled on, and she again found 
herself a widow. Like a good housewife in those days 
when no factories were in operation, she kept her flock of 
sheep, and attended to the various processes of converting 
their product into cloth ; and her fame extended beyond 
the limits of the town. 

" Near the house is a good spring, which still flows as 
of old. It was a time for wool washing. Laying aside 
the widow's weed», dressed in a lea her apron, a man's 
broad brim hat. and other apparel to match, she was 
washing her wool at the spring, when a stranger on horse- 
back approached, and inquired for the residence of the 
widow Dennett? 

11 Nothing, daunted, she pointed to the house, directed 
him to the front door, while she entered the back way. 
Pie was not long in waiting before the lady of the house, 
in comely apparel appeared. The gentleman introduced 
himself as John Plummer of Rochester. He had heard of 
her good reputation ; said perhaps it was too soon to come 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 15. 

courting ; but wouid ask the privilege in proper time of- 
roposing himself to her favorable consideration. In due 
nie John Plummer came again, and they were married, 
'he}' lived happily together many years. Their grave- 
;ones in Rochester record the ages of each at about 
inety years. 

11 Whether he ever inquired who it was he found wash- 
lg the wool at the Spring, we have never been informed. 
[ the events at the well where Rebecca was found, were 
f sufficient importance to be perpetuated, there is cer- 
linly enough of the primitive simplicity in the meeting at 
aat spring to keep it still in lasting remembrance by the 
escendants of that respectable family. To us, whenever 
e pass the premises, or are reminded of its history by 
*eing the elevated old mansion even across the mill pond, 
lere ever appears the vision of the Judge on his horse, 
nd the industrious widow disguised under her bioaii-brim 
nd leather apron." 

During the Revolutionary War, the house was owned 
y Ephraim Dennett, (grandson of John,) whose widow in 
iter years, after a courtship savoring of the romantic, 
larried Judge John Plummer of Rochester ; (as we see 
y the sketch copied from Brewster's Rambles.) 

By the records of Strawberry Bank, ( Portsmouth,) John 
lennett at various times held the following named offices: 

1676-7, chosen one of the Jury of Trials ; 

1678, chosen Tythingman. 
.s to thf nature of the office of Tythingman, we quote 
om record of Town Meeting, held March 22, 1678, when 

was voted, that, — 

M The Selectmen at the next meeting appoint some 
onest men to inspect their neighbors, as the law directs, 
)r preventing drunkenness and disorder." 

In pursuance of this duty, John Dennett had oversight 
f ten of his neighbors. 

In 1679, ne was again chosen Grand Juror ; 

In 1680, again a Juror of Trial ; 

In 1681, Constable • 



l6. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

In 1688, the town was debtor to John Dennett ,£40 for 
work done on the Minister's house. 

In 1693, the town being indebted to John Dennett, gave 
him a vacant piece of land on the way that goes from 
Maj. Vaughan's tanyard towards Bloody Point ; (now 
called Gravelly Ridge.) 

This land he subsequently gave to his son Joseph. 
- John Dennet died May 5, 1709, and is buried at Point of 
Graves. His will is on record at Kxeter. 

The Portsmouth Times, of Nov. 9, 1901, has an account 
of the removal of the old Dennett cemetery from Christian 
Shore to a new lot in the Proprietors' Cemetery. In ttrs 
article the writer says : 

" According to what has been learned, the old cemetery 
owes it name to John Dennett, who came to this city in 
1668. Whether he laid out the burial lot is undecided ; 
but probably the son, as John Dennett himself is buried in 
the old Point of Graves Cemetery, on Mechanic street. 

" In 1681, a year atterthe old house was built, Joseph 
Dennett, son of John, was born. His death occurred in 
1714. During his short but exceedingly active life he 
was very prominently identified with the affairs of the 
town. He served in the Provincial army ; was in the 
French War of 1712 ; and his descendants are many. 

<4 Undoubtedly Joseph was the one who laid out the amily 
burial ground ; and it is supposed he was buried there; 
for among the fifty graves, in one corner were found a lot 
of field stones, such as were used in those days for head- 
stones ; and the remains of unidentified bodies, undoubt- 
edly the early members of the family. 

44 The field in which the cemetery was located, covered 
six acres. In one corner was the cellar of an old Garrison 
house. The identity of the house is unknown. Probably 
it was built by one of the early members of the Dennett 
family." 

April 2, 1673, John Dennett bought of John Fernald, 
for ^26, twelve acres of upland, '* lying and being between 
ye land of Richard Jackson on the northeasterly, and the 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 17. 

land of one Robert Mattoon south or westerly thereof it* 
Mr. Richard Cutt his mill creek, which sd 12 acres of 
land was granted unto Mr. Renald Fernald in his life 
time, as ma}' appear by ye record of ye town of Portsmo." 

The land above referred to, containing the old grave- 
yard, may bt a part of this same tract. 

Alexander the elder brother of John, boru probably 
about 1640, did not attain the prominence in public life 
that John did. He also was a carpenter and a surveyor 
of land. By prudence and industry he acquired a small 
competency. He lived the larger part of his life at New 
Castle, where he died in 1698. 

He had two sons, Alexander and Samuel. Alexander, jr. 
was born in New Castle, about 1670. His second wife was 
Esther or M Easter" Cross. He lived a part of his life in 
Kittery, by the town records, as he had land granted him, 
(twenty acres,) and served as surveyor of highways. He 
possessed somewhat of a military spirit, was in the Pro- 
vincial army in 1696, and Col- Vaughan's regiment in the 
French War, 17 12. 

Samuel, the second son, was a blacksmith ; probably 
never married. 

Alexander 2nd, died in 1733. 

John Dennet had three sons, John, Joseph and Ephraim, 
and one daughter, Amy. John second, born 1675, mar- 
ried Mary, the widow of Alexander Shapleigh, in 1702: 
Her maiden name was Adams, daughter of Christopher 
and Margaret Adams. 

In 169s, John Dennet purchased for one hundred pounds 
of Isaac Remick, son of Christian a tract of land in Kittery 
in the western part of the town, adjoining Spinney's 
Creek, containing, as shown by the deed, seventy and 
seven acres. This land was evidently bought for his son 
John, who at once occupied it, first living in the house 
already on the place. But within a few years after the 
purchase of the place he built a new house. 

This is the present house, — still standing, — and was 
built somewhere between the years 1706 and 1710. It is a 
two story frame house ; 30 feet by 40 feet w r ith 16 foot posts. 



IS. PISCATAOUA PIONEERS. 

It is in general style and construction like the house 
erected by the first John Dennet at Christian Shore ; and 
the lower story is filled in with hewn hemlock logs 6in. by 
i2in. probably for the double purpose of additional warmth 
and protection against Indian bullets. 

On the farm John the second lived and died in 1742, 
and is buried in the old family lot near the creekside. 
He had a family of five children, — two boys and three 
girls. His son John succeeded to the estate. 

John Dennet second was active in town affairs ; was 
Selectman fifteen years, between 1710 and 1731 ; Member 
of the Assembly of 1712 ; Town Agent for three years 

His daughter Mary, born 1703, lived to the great age of 
ninety-four years, and was blind through life. 

He left considerable property, including a negro slave, 
named Pompey, whom he willed to his eldest son. 

Amy Dennet, only daughter of John, born 1679, marritd 
John Adams, son of Charles and Margaret Adams, of 
Kittery, 1698 ; and lived at Adam's Oaks, near her brother 
John. They had five children. 

Joseph, the second son of John, has already been re- 
ferred to. 

The English Dennetts : — 

- From time to time attempts have been made to trace the 
connections between the Dennett family in this country 
and those of the same name in England, — but, without 
success. 

Mr. Charles Dennett, a native of Lyman. Maine, whose 
business, along in the 7o's, called him to England, made 
careful research to discover the missing link between the 
two ends of the family chain : — 

According to his investigations, the family is of Norman 
origin, Hugh d'Anet having come over with William the 
Conqueror as an officer in his army, and had large estates 
conferred on him. 

Peter d'Anet, abbot of Constance, was appointed Pre- 
ceptor to Louis IX. He was an author of some consider- 
ation, whose works are still extant; and some of his 



r . 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 19. 

descendants are still found in that neighborhood. One-of 
the royal residences in Normandy does, — or did a few 
years since, retain the family name, Chateau d'Anet. 

There are branches of the Dennett family at Newport, 
Isle of Wight and in Sussex County. Their occupation is 
farming. Mr. John Leighton Dennett, of Hurst Pierpont, 
Sussex, is Lord oi : the Manor ; owns about six hundred 
acres of land ; and holds the title deeds of the estate to the 
Dennetts of 600 years. 

Mr. Charles Dennett also visited another gentleman by 
the name of William Hugh Dennett of Worthins and 
Stonington, Sussex Co.unty, gentleman, solicitor, finding 
him a cordial and agreeable person. 

The name of a'Dennet, or Denne-at, is a name of great 
antiquity in the parish of Woodmincote, Sussex : 

Agnes de la Dt;ne occurs in 1598 ; and Thomas at Dene 
was a parishiom r at the time of the Nona Return, 1341 ; 
Thomas Druiet was Prebendary of Herefild in 1478. 

The name of Der.rett signifies ''a narrow valley. '* The 
name was spelled with one / by all the early Denets, and 
is so spelled by some of the later generations. Just when 
the other / was added, I do not know. 

The Dennetts from the first ancestors down, seem to 
have had an inclination towards holding public offices. 
We find the first John Dennett, as already noted, filling 
offices. None have attained high place in their country's 
service, but they have faithfully administered such minor 
offices as have be.tn placed in their charge. 

Offices Held by Dennetts :— 

John Dennet : 1678, tythingman ; 1679, grand juror ; 
16S0, member jury of trials; 1681, constable ; 1689, collec- 
tor of taxes ; 1702' member of assembly ; selectman seven 
years, one year unanimously elected ; chairman of board 
several years, holding that position at the time of his 
decease. 

John Dennet second, (eldest son of John,) 1707, consta- 
ble ; selectman, Kittery, fifteen years between 1710-31 ; 
member of assembly, 17 12 ; town agent, three years. 



20. FISCATAOUA PIONEERS. 

Joseph Dennet (second son of John,) lived to be * thirty- 
eight years old ; was a commissioner, auditor of accounts; 
the year of his decease he was in the Provincial Army, in 
Colonel Vaughan's regiment, in the French war of 1712. 

Ephraim Dennett, (youngest son of John,) seems to 
have been a leader among men, distinguished for his 
eminent ability and learning ; was prominent in social, 
military, state and church affairs ; had the confidence of 
his fellow townsmen who frequently honored him with 
positions of trust and distinction, viz. — 

Moderator, church warden, lieutenant and captain of 
infantry 1 719 and 1720, auditor of accounts, coroner seven 
years, assessor two years, selectman four years, member 
of the assembly eight years, auditor of the assembly 1730, 
councillor by mandamus 1732 and by appointment 1734. 
and i^S, assisted in running the division lines of the town 
of Kingston 1740. Died 1741. 

John Dennett, grandson of the John Dennett of Ports- 
mouth, as appears by the town records, was chosen March 
11, 174S, one of the selectmen of Kittery, and was chosen 
to the same office every year, except 1757 and 1758, until 
1769 inclusive. He was also chosen during the same 
period to other town offices, such as moderator, town 
agent, etc. In 1750 and 51 he was Representative to the 
General Court. 

William Dennett (son of John third,) 1780, constable, 
collector of taxes for third or middle parish. 

Mark Dennett, (son of William fourth,) for many years 
in the earlier part of his life he was quite prominently 
identified with the interests of the town. In 1811 he was 
elected selectman, serving nine consecutive years, and 
subsequent he filled 'the same position'eight years more. 
From 1814 to 1S19 he represented Kittery in the Massa- 
chusetts General Court ; was a member of the Conven- 
tion to form the Constitution of Maine in 1820; — 
First Representative of Kittery in the First Legislature of 
Maine ; afterwards served in lower house and Senate. In 
1829-40, collector of customs at York. 1840, keeper of 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 21. 

Boon Island Light, trial justice, chairman of school com- 
mittee, and for more than forty years a teacher in the 
public schools ; for seventy-five years a member of the 
Christian Church in Kittery. 

The Coat of Arms : — 

It is not probable that the pioneer Dennetts gave any 
thought or attention to Coats of Arms, or such ornamental 
frills of society ; their descendants, however, have looked 
the matter up as a thing of historical and genealogical 
interest. 

There are several different Coats of Arms assigned to 
the name ol Dennett in the books on heraldry. The one 
held to be bestowed on the probable ancestral family of 
the American Dennetts, is a shield with a sable field and 
sprinkled with drops of rain ; the center is ermine, and 
the crest a boar's head white, erased proper. 

Guillame's History of Heraldry, says of the Dennett 
Coat ot Arms, that the bearings are both ancient and 
honorable, as becometh a Christian soldier. 

The story is that the Dennetts were officers under the 
Emperor Marcus Aurelius, among who^e army were some 
of the primitive Christians. As they were about to come 
to battle with a much larger army ot infidels, the Romans 
were much distressed for want of water. Immediately 
before joining in battle, the Romans dropped on their 
knees and implored the God of Battles for success. 

While in the act of prayer, a tremendous storm of 
thunder and rain began, that dismayed the infidels and 
refreshed the famishing Romans ; the infidels believing 
the thunder to be the result of the prayers. In the con- 
fusion the Romans fell upon^them and were victorious. — 
The Twelfth Legion were henceforth styled the Fuimen 
Atrix, or the Thundering Legion. 

The Coat of Arms is supposed to be designed in allusion 
to this incident ; the drops of rain on the shield represent- 
ing the providential shower that came in answer to prayer ; 
and the motto, Per Dei Providentiam, in memory of Qod's 



.22. PISCATAOUA PIONEERS. 

providence in supplying the timely shower whereby the 
infidel foe was discomfited. 

Family History : 

No complete history of the family, to my knowledge, has 
yet been published, although several of the descendants 
have made extensive research and compilation of family 
records. Descendants of the two original Dennetts are 
now scattered over the length and breadth of the land. 
Probably there are representatives in nearly every State, 
though most numerous in New England. 

Among those who have taken special interest in family 
genealogy, are William H. Dennett, of Boston, Jeremy 
Bentham Dennett of Taunton, and Winfield Scott Dennett 
of Saco. It is hoped the research and labor of these gen- 
tlemen may be published in book form in due time. 

As time goes on these old records become more valuable. 
It is well to preserve in durable form the history, though 
incomplete and fragmentary, of the sturdy pioneers who 
endured the hardships and privations of anew country, 
and tamed the wilderness for later generations to inherit 
and enjoy. 

In the course of his address, Mr. Dennett showed a 
"rubbing" of the inscription on the John Dennet grave- 
stone : — 

HERE LYES INTERRED THE 

BODY OF JOHN DEXXET ESQ 

AGED 63 YEARS, DEPARTED 

THIS LIFE MAY 5, 1709 

Hon. Moses A. Safford, made interesting remarks about 
the early Pioneers of the Piscataqua ; after which a fine 
dinner was eaten at the Hotei ; and the afternoon was 
spent in viewing the old Pepperrell Mansion, Sparhawk 
Mansion, Lady Pepperrell Mansion, and the old First 
Parish Church and Parsonage. 

It was a fine day for the meeting ; everybody seemed to 
enjoy it. O. P. Rkmick. 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 23. 

By-Jf aws, piscataqua pioimrs* * 

Article I. 

Sec/ion I. The name of the Society shall be the — 
Piscataqua Pioneers. 

Article II. 
Objects of the Society. 
• Sec 1. The object for which this Society is established, 
is for securing and preserving the records of Piscataqua 
Pioneers and their descendants. 

It is historical as well as genealogical and biographical ; 
to visit historical points of interest, and to promote the 
acquaintance and good fellowship of its associates. 

To learn the names of the earlier settlers on both sides 
of the Piscataqua River, within the limits of what is 
known as the Piscataqua Plantation, or Piscataqua Set- 
tlement, and contiguous territory, from the earliest times 
down to the period within the memory of men now living. 
To learn the several parts they took in the accomplish- 
ment of the objects of the pioneers in this vicinity,' as well 
as to trace them and their descendants in other avenues of 
life, whether near or remote, in their several contributions 
to the advancement ot American civilization, — its litera- 
ture, arts and its industries. 

To provide for their association to the end that those 
generations who may come after us shall not be ignorant 
of those who first dealt with the wilderness and its 
aborigines, planting homes in the New World, and that 
they may in some degree be enabled to trace the pathways 
of their ancestors within th border limits of oui common 
country. 

Article III. 
Membership. 

Sec- 1. All members other than the incorporation shall 
be elected to membership at the regular meetings. 

Sec. 2. All application for membership shall be made 
on blanks, printed for that purpose, and shall bear the 
recommendation of at least two members. 



'24. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

Any person of good moral character who is a descendant 
of a "Piscataqua Pioneer," ma}' become a member of this 
Society by being proposed by some member, and elected 
by a majority vote. 

Persons proposed may be voted for singl) 7 at the request 
of any member. 

By the word Plo?ieers y it is understood to mean, all those 
who were of the '■' Piscataqua Plantation" prior to the 
Declaration of Independence. 

Sec. j. The membership shall consist of Annual mem- 
bers, Life members, Corresponding and Honorary members. 

Annual members shall be those who pay to the society 
an annual assessment. 

Life members shall be those who pay the life members 
fee. 

. Corresponding members shall be those who from time to 
time, when called upon, shall render genealogical service 
to the society in lieu of an assessment, and who are not 
either annual or life members. 

Honorary members are those who have been proposed 
and elected as such. 

See. 4. Each person at the time of his or her election, 
as an annual member, shall pay an admission fee of Two 
Dollars to the Secretary, for the use of the Society ; such 
fee shall be in lieu of the annual assessment for that year. 

Bach annual member shall pay an assessment of One 
Dollar per year, for the use of the society. 

The fee for Life membership shall be twenty- five dollars. 

Scr. j Any person may be suspended or dropped, for 
cause determined by the majority of the Board of Directors. 

Article IV. 
Meetings. 

Sec. 1. The Annual meeting shall be held in Ports- 
mouth, N. H. in the month of August, on such day and 
hour, and at such place, as the Directors may determine. 

Sec. 2. Special meetings may be called at any time by 
the Board of Directors ; also on petition in writing by five 
members of the Society- 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 25. 

Article V. 
Officers. 
Sec. 1. The Officers of this Society shall consist of a 
President, ten or more Vice Presidents, Treasurer, Sec- 
retary, Curator, and a Board of Directors: — 

All of whom shall be elected at the Annual Meeting. 
They shall severally hold offices for the term of one year, 
or until their successors are elected. 
k Article VI. 
Duties of Officers. 
President and Vice President. 
Sec. 1. The President shall preside at all meetings of 
the Pioneers and ot the Board of Directors ; in his absence 
one of the Vice Presidents shall preside ; if all are absent, 
a temporary Chairman shall be chosen. 
Article VII- 
Treasurer. 
Ser. 1. The Treasurer shall receive all money from the 
Secretary ; pay all bills as approved by the President ; 
and make a detailed report at the annual meeting. 
Article VIII. 
Secretary. 

Sec. 1. The Secretary shall attend all meetings, and 
keep a true record of their doings. 

Sec. 2. He shall collect all money due the Society, and 
pay the same to the Treasurer ; record the names of all 
members, and the time of their admission ;, and transmit 
to each person elected to membership a printed copy of the 
act of incorporation and by-laws ; and make a detailed 
report at the annual meeting. 

Sec. j. He shall notify every member of the annual and 
special meetings, giving a seven day notice by mail. 

Sec. ./.In his absence a Secretary pro tern may be chosen. 
Article IX. 
Board of Directors. 

Sec. 1. At the Annual Meeting there shall be chosen 
five members as a Board of Directors ; they shall have 



26. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

charge of the general affairs of the Society, make all con- 
tracts, appropriate moneys, fix the compensation of all 
officers, and have in all other ways the general manage- 
ment of the Society. 

Sec. 2. They shall serve for one year each, and make 
a detailed report at the Annual Meeting. 

Article X. 
Curator. 
Sec. i. The Curator shall have charge of all Historical 
work, Library and Genealogical datas, which may from 
time to time be presented to the Society. 
Article XI. 
Quorum. 
Sec. i. Five members shall constitute a Quorum. 
Article XII. 
Seal, 
The Board of Directors may adopt a Seal of such design 
as in their judgment maybe proper; giving name and 
date of incorporation. 

Article YIII. 
Amendments. 
Sec. i. Any article in the By-laws may be suspended, 
altered or amended, by a two-thirds vote of those members 
present at any meeting, provided they shall have been 
submitted to the Board of Directors, and incorporated in 
the notice to the members. 



Names of flembers. 

Capt. T. M. Jackson, 215 Montague St. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Albert H. Lamson, Elkins,- N. H. 

John M. Moses, Strafford, N. H. 

H. W. Fernald, M. O. Div. Boston P. O. 

M. A. Safford, Kittery, Maine. 

J. L. M. Willis, M. D. Kliot, Maine. 

O. P. Remick, Kittery Depot, Maine. 

Alexander Dennett, Kittery, Maine. 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 27. 

H W. Hardon, 60 Wall street, New York. 

Albert E. Rhodes, 6 Beacon street, Boston. 

Horace Mitchell, Kittery, Maine. 

Miss Gertrude Sias 37 Wadsvvorth St. East Boston, Mass 

Miss Alice J. Moore, Kittery, Maine. 

Mrs. Josephine Dennett, Kittery, Maine. 

Miss Theodora Chase, Newton, Mass. 

Alfred A. Stocker, M. D. 49 Belmont St. Cambridge, Ms. 

J. R. Stanwood, Portsmouth, N. H. 

O. L. Frisbee, Portsmouth, N. H. 

J. W. Hobbs, Kittery, Maine. 

W. M. Emery, Fall River, Mass., (resigned.) 

James VV. Walker, Kittery Point, Maine. 

Rev. C. P. Emery, Kittery Point, Maine. 

Mrs. Florence A. Crane, DesMoines, Iowa. 

Denison R. Slade, Centre Harbor, N. H. 

John W. Deering, 299 Newbury street, Boston. 

Mrs. Anna M. Chandler Riley, Claremont, N. H. 

Samuel K. Hamilton, 31 Milk street, Boston, Mass. 

John Scales, Dover, N. H. 

Mrs. Lettie M. O'Neil, Claremont, N. H. 

Mrs. Annie B. McKinney, 822 N. High St. Columbus, Ohio 

Justin H. Shaw, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Charles A. Hazlett, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Oliver K. Grant, 154 Boulevard, New York. 

Rev. George M. Bodge, 11 Meredeth St. Roxbury, Mass. 

Honorary Members : — 
L. W. Brewster; Portsmouth, N. H. 
Hon. E. W. Pearson, Concord, N. H. 

Corresponding Members :— 
H. I. Durgin, M. D. Eliot, Maine. 
F. M. Sise, Portsmouth, N. H. 



2S. riSCATAQUA PIONF.KRS. 

Said to be the oldest continuously travelled Road in Maine. 

The curving shore, the orchard and the field 

Yet hold their places, and the River Road 
Winds through yon village, half in trees concealed, 

Where Peace has its beneficent abode; 

Beyond, the white Church on the upland showed; 
Lifts its fair turret, and each sylvan nook 

Glows in the landscape, as it e'er has glowed 
Since Memory its fond departure took 
To dwell upon .the Past as 'twere a book. 
— B. P. Shillaber. 

An Old Road I It is really a page of history ; it awakens 
memories and traditions ; brings the old-time names and 
homes freshly to thought ; renews in imagination the 
ancient houses and the very people who dwelt in them. 

Eliot has an Old Road. Older than memory or even 
history goes. William Fogg, the historian and genealo- 
gist of our town, whose pen was ever regarded as clear 
and reliable, calls it the "oldest co7itinuoiisly travelled 
road in Maine." And its history, if really investigated, 
may reveal it as one or the most ancient roads in use and 
travel in the country. 

It has been an open path more years than can be 
counted : — 

First, it was the Indian trail along the banks of the 
winsome Piscataqua; — the river that not only was the 
attraction of the original Indians, but also as early as 
1602, — years before Plymouth Ro :k became the stepping 
stone, — there came to our Eliot and Kittery shores, the 
companies of English fishermen, who took such pleasure 
in their successes, that log-cabins were built on the very 
edges of the trail ; and these cabins on the rims of both 
the river and the trail, became their homes year after year. 

The Indian trail of that early date, [1602,] came from 
the old fields of Newichawannock and extended to Kittery 
Point. 

It is not strange that this Indian trail, with its natural 
beauty, — our broad river on oue side, and the hills and 



THE OLD ROAD. . 29. 

trees on the other, — became not 'only the footpath of the 
Indians, but when the whites came hither for a home,' it 
became a. permanent road, never surrendered and never 
limited ; but for the entire three centuries since those 
early white men built their rude homes for the summer 
fishing, has it been an open and fret road, and the homes 
of successive generations. 

From the fishing grounds at Quamphegan Falls, 
through the hunting ground of Newichiwannock, by the 
winter camps at 01 ifields and Sturgeon Creek, — alon^ the 
river from Cammocks Creek to Frank's fort, where the 
clams abounded in great quantities, and where the Indians 
came at regular intervals, may be traced the ancient trail, 
which developed into, and is now occupied as the Old Road; 
and through the South part of Eliot, through ancient 
Kittery, to the fishing grounds of Spruce Creek and to 
the ocean, may the old trail be followed. 

The name, Old Road, now only lingers for a small part 
of the way, — other names having been given to other 
portions. 

Yes, it is the same Old Road of comfort and beauty 
today, that runs 011 the edge of the Eiict short, tl.en 
winding inland for a little, it- again reaches out to the river 
bank, until the limits of the old town are reached. 

The length ol the period that the Old Road has been 
in open use and travel, we can only judge by the time of 
the settlement of this region : 

It was a trail when our settlers first landed ; in later 
years allusions to it have given it the one name, — The 
Old Road. 

In 1650, a letter written by one of the Leightons alludes 
to living on "the Old Road," near Watts' Fort. 

Again, in 1652, the quill of an ancient resident calls it 
"the Old Road." . . 

In 1687, a letter of Charles Frost gives the thoroughfare 
the same name. 

At the date of each of the manuscripts, there were resi- 
dents and homesteads. And there have bee^n relics and 



30. THE OI.D ROAD. 

indications of old time houses at various times unearthed. 
Many are the traditions of the homes on the river rim. 
and also farther from the shore, when the road turned 
inward and again went river-ward. 

It is easy even to this far-away time to trace the homes 
of the early families of the — 

Shapleighs. Dixons, 

Leightons, Foggs, 

Spinneys, Libbeys, 

Staples, Hanscomes, 

Hammonds Remicks, 

and many more, who not only established homes, but were 
valued and useful names ; names that have given merit, 
not only to families, but to the wisdom and the good sense 
of Eliot. 



©lances af PbdpIb anfo Bocaliftes 

of the Past. 

CHARLKS A. SHAPLEIGH. 

The readers of Old Eliot are doubtless awnre that the 
history of Kittery and Eliot and the history of the 
Shapleigh family run along the same lines ; — Shapleighs 
being one of the early families. Squire William Fogg, 
(as he was called in the days of my childhood.) brought 
the 'record of the family to 1850. He did a fine work. 
Col. Francis Keefe also had a papf r concerning Nicholas 
Shapleigh, of great interest to the family of today. 
In one number of old Kliot, Capt. Elisha Shapleigh Sen'r, 
Gen. Andrew P. Fernald are coupled as the two foremost 
men of their day. Both these men were my great-grand- 
parents. 

Capt. Elisha Shapleigh, junior, (ray grandfather,) 
married Martha Fernald, daughter of Andrew Pep^. rell 
Femald. 

Of General Fernald a most kindly act was told me by 
Moses Goodwin, (the lather of Moses E. Goodwin.) He 
said that his ancestor, the first Goodwin that came into 



PEOPLE AND LOCALITIES. . 31. 

Lliot. (then a part of Kitu-ry,) had for his personal riches 
simply a stout heart, and a pair of hands willing to work ; 
and the people questioned if it were wise to receive one 
who might "fall into distress," (as the Maine- Statutes of 
that date read. ) It was possible that he and his family 
might become an expense. 

But Gen. Fernald came nobly forward to the officials, 
and offered to stand between the young Mr. Goodwin and 
the town ; and at once gave his bond to the officials ; 
asserting that the town should be holden for no expense. 
And most surely his expectations were met. 

It was an honor indeed to place Gen. Fernald and Capt. 
Elisha ShjpTeigh. sen'r, as the forem >^t men; for there 
were living in that generatiun the Foggs, Leightons, 
Hammonds, Frosts, Staples, Rogers families, an<i many 
others who were truly In advance, yes, more thau ubrea»t 
of those earlier times. 

Do you ask me what I mean by this ? 

One answer will be that they were pos c essors of a 
Library; massive volumes of standard wor=«3 ; .he very 
best that the world could give at that period. 

My father told me of this Library; and that I v^ould 
find the books with A. .drew Leighton, Librarian. — or 
Custodian, as he was then called. Sixty jears ago, when 
I was but fifteen years old, [1840,] I read these books. 
They were the. best literature of that day. 

Shall I no v give a little history of York County, in 
which the Sbapleighs played a part : — 

One Francis Small, an Indian traaer, bo ight )i Capt. 
Sunday, an Indian Chieftain, at Qnampes -.,in, So nh 
Berwick,) a tract of land along the Saco River, for a few 
guns, a little powder and shot, and some red flannel. 

Nicholas Shapleigh bought an undivided half oi this 
tract ; and 1 am quite sure the Chieftain gave the deed to 
them jointly ; for I have read it. About tweiuv years a^o 
I was in Alfred, on Probate business ; and I wen the 
office of the Register of Deeds ; and he brought me the 
Indian Deed. It was the greatest curiosity aao^' ail the 



2,2. PEOPLE AND LOCALITIES., 

papers of York County. It was signed with a Turtle, and 
was duly witnessed. 

For a number of years this deed was mislaid. When it 
was found it was taken before the Courts and allowed to 
be valid; and the Smalls and the Shapleighs and their 
heirs entered into possession. 

— And now I will relate what I know of the Shipyard, 
that was at Green Acre ; and the ships that were built 
there more than sixty years ago : 

Capt. Samuel Hanscom built the ship Elisabeth Hamilton. 
All the people of Eliot were invited to be present at the 
launching, and partake of the dinner provided in the 
Mold loft. I was present ; a fine dinner, and no lack of 
good things. 

William Jones, the first Dry Goods merchant of Ports- 
mouth, was the principal owner of this ship. His son, 
William Jones, jun'r, and his son-in-law (who married 
his daughter,) made up the firm. 

Mr. Jones, sen'r, once lived on the Hammond site. — 
Another man of note once lived on the Benjamin Kennard 
place; his name was Pierpont ; he went to Portsmouth 
later, and for many years he was the foremost Physician 
in the city. 

Another Eliot man to go to Portsmouth to prosper, was 
John Knowlton, Ship Blacksmith. He was said to be the 
richest man in New Hampshire. 

— But, to return to the Shipyard at Green Acre: 

We will see if we can get the next ship off the ways 
into the salt water. These were the times of the first 
World's Fair in London ; when they had the Crystal 
Palace ; the time of the finding gold in California ; when 
every EJjot boy that could shoulder an ax could get big 
pay in building clippers that could sail from New York or 
Boston to Liverpool in thirteen days, — fairly outstripping 
the steamboats of that period : The Typhoon, the Dread- 
nought, the Ocean Racer, and others. 

It was now that Jenny Lind, the Swedish Nightingale 
came, to stir up the whole nation. Following her came a 



PEOPLE AND tOCAMTlES. . 33. 

wede, one of her own nation; he had quite a sum of 
lonej which he wished to invest, and as there was a great 
emand for clipper ships, be thought he would have one 
»uilt to carry passengers to and from the World's Fair, 
le would name the clipper, for Jennie Lind. He employed 
Villiam L. Hanscom to make the model, and lay down 
he lines, and build the clipper, — which he did at the yard 
it Green Acre. She was named The Nighti?igale, lor the 
vonderful singer. 

Before the clipper was completed, the Swede's money 
jave out. He and his builder thuught the best thing to 
lo was to get money of others and complete her ; and then 
;et an agent to sell her. This was done ; Ex. Governor 
>oodwln, of Portsmouth, was made the selling agent. 

She sailed for Boston ; and even among the splendid 
Uppers she made a sensation ; was declared to be the 
inest thing afloat. 

She took a cargo for Liverpool. Here her owners laid a 
vager, — $10,000; and issued a challenge lor a run to 
Calcutta. This challenge was accepted ; and — 

the Nightingale out-ran and out-sailed 
ler Knglish competitor, and easily won the wager. 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS. 

Kittery, August 20th, 1779. 

this Day Recived Zebedee Witham, and Passed 
Muster at my Camp, as an Able Soldier, in the Rume 
3f Mr. John Fogg; to Joyn the Continental Army 
until the Last Day of November, as 

Witness my Hand, — 

Elisha Shapi^sigh. 



3* 



OATH - OF- A I,M$G I A^CEv 1 .7 7 6. 



(5afljf'.n|3inegxanc.8, 

Etiox Men, 1776. 

A Broadside in Mass. Hist. So. Building. 
BY O. P. REMICK. 

The following Fifty Men of Eliot, signed an Oath of 
Allegiance, in 1776, to the Colony Laws. 

In accord with Resolution of the Continental Congress, 
14 March, 1776 : They agreed to oppose the British Arms 
with arms ; and to support the Colony: — 



Dennis Fernald, 

William Stacy, 

Daniel Emery, 

Daniel Emery, 

Daniel Emery, 

Samuel Emery, 

Simon Emery, 

Abner Witham, 

Jere'h Witham, his mark, 

James Bartlett, 

John Bartlett, 

Jeremiah Bartlett, 

Edm. Coffin, 

Jacob Brouner, 
Daniel Goold, 
Richard Chick, 
Amos Chick, his mark, 
Benjamin Hod son, 
Bryant Davis, his mark, 
Joseph Johnson, his mark 
Elisha Shapleigh, 
James Shapleigh, 
Dependence Shapleigh, 
Samuel Shapleigh, 
Andrew Trace, 



James Fernald, 

Stephen Emery, 

David Furbish, 

Ephraim Clark, 

David Lord, 

Thomas Hammond, 

Edwin Witham, his mark , 

Joshua Staple, Jun'r, 

Robert Staple, 

Noah Staple, 

Samuel Tobey, 

John Hill, Jun'r, 

William Goold, 

James Nason, 

Nathan Libbey, 

John Leighton, 

William Leighton, 

James Kennard, 

Gideon Lydston, 

Jim Ferguson, 

John Foster, 

Alpheus Spring, 

Daniel Goodwin, 

Jacob Shorey, 

Christopher Hammond. 



0U>. ELIOT, 35. 

mhl 3Togg, 1660, anb fjis ©msttbariis. 

Copied from the MSS of Jeremy Fogg, (born 1744,) 
by G. F. Shedd. Nashua. 

At. Daniel Fogg, my Great Grand Father, was Born 
the year 1660, and Died in Kittery, June 9th day, 1755, 
;d 95 years. 
?apt. Daniel Fogg, my Grand Father, was Born April 

12th day, 1694. 
Irs. Anna Fogg, my Grand Mother, was Born August 

16th, 1694. 

Irs. Anna Fogg, my Grandmother, Died Aprilye 15th, 
5, aged 80 years & 8 months. 
?apt. Daniel Fogg, my grand Father, Died November 

30th, 1782, aged 88 years & 7 months & 18 days, 
iamuel Fogg, their first Son and my Father, was Born 
le ye first day, 1716. And died October the 30, 1798, 
ed 82 years, 4 months, 19 days. 

ly Aunt Anna Fogg, their first Daughter, was Born 
>r. the 16th, 17 18, married August 24, 1738, to 
in Libbee 

ly .>unt Hannah Fogg their Second Daughter was 
n Novemb. ye 12th day, 1719, married to Wm. Hasty, 
>tm. ye 8th, 1743. 

ly Uncle Ruben Fogg, their Second Son, was Born 
le ye first day, 1722 ; 

larried May ye 15th, 1744, to Margaret Elder, 
ly Aunt Mary Fogg, their third Daughter, was Born 
y ye 28th day, 1724 ; married to George Hanscom, 
vm'br ye 13th, 1746. 

ly Aunt Keturah Fogg, their 4th Daughter, was Born 
>r. ye 5th day, 1727, married Decem'br ye 3d, 1753, to 
sha Hanscom v & he dyed Febuary ye 24, yr 1776, 
ut 12 a Clock at night. 

[y Aunt Esther Fogg, their 5th Daughter, was Born 
ob'r ye 15th day, 1729; married to Elisha L,ibbey, 
>r. 9th, 1748. 

^ 70Q02X 



36. DANIJSt FOGG, 1660 

My Aunt Rhoda Fogg, their Sixth Daughter," was Born 
March the 15th day, 1733, and Died 

My Uncle Daniel Fogg, their Third Son, was Born 
Decemb'r ye 5th, 1735. Married to Sarah Scott, of 
Mechias, and he Died Febr the 7th, 1766, at Mechias, aged 
3oy, 2m, & 2 Days. He was Killed by ye Limb of a tree, 
which unhappily fell from the tree on which he was 
Cutting. 

Mr. Samuel Fogg, my Father, was Born June ye first, 
1716. 

Mrs. Rachel Fogg, my Mother, was Born August ye 
19th, 1723. 

They were married January the 27th day, 1743. 

Mrs. Rachel Fogg, my mother, Died March ye 24th 
176s, Aged 44 y, 7 m. & 4 Days. 

Mr. Sam'l Fogg, my Father, married ye 2d time, Novm. 
ye 12th, 1770 to Elisabeth Moody. March ye 17th, 1774 
She Died, aged about 58 years. 

I, Jeremy Fogg, their first Son, was Born June the nth 
day, 1744. 

My Brother Knoch, their Second Son, was Born May ye 
28th, 1746. Married June ye 4th, 1772, to Lois Nutter. 

My Brother Edmond, their third Son, was Born March 
the 28th, 1728, married Augt the 6th, 1772, to Sarah 
Warren. And he died April the 26, 1801, Aged 53 years, 
1 month, 28 Days. 

My Sister Esther, their first Daughter, was Born March 
ye 29th, 1750. And Died Janur' ye first day, 1768, Aged 
17 years 8 months & 29 Days. 

My Sister Sarah, their Second Daughter was Born 
August ye 6th, 1752, and Died July ye 4th, 1767, aged 14 
years 9 months & 29 Days. 

My Brother, their 4th Son, was Born July ye 2d, 1754, 
and Died July ye 3d, 1754, N. Stile. 

My Sister Anna, their 3d Daughter, was Born Novemb. 
the 29th, 1755, married to Joseph Robberds, Febuary the 
8 day, 1776 ; he died October the 4, 1798. 



JEREMY FOGG. 37 

ly Brother Samuel, their 5th Son, was Born April ye 

h, 1760. 

,Iy sister Rhoda, their 4th Daughter, was Born April 

26th, 1762. 

vly sister Rachel, their 5th Daughter, was Born Septm. 

12th, 1764. 

[, Jeremy Fogg, was Born June ye nth, 1744. 
Vlary, my Wife, was Born January the 30, 1742. and we 
s married May the 28th, 1766. Mary Fogg, my wife, 
;d December the 19, 1800. Aged 58 yr, 10 m, & 19 days, 
id I was married the 2 time, June the 14, 1801, to Molly 
cket. 

George, my first Son, was Born March ye 25th, 1767, 
d Died May ye 5th, 1767, aged one month & n Days. 
Sarah, my first Daughter, was Born June ye '20th, 1768, 
out n at night; first quarter [moon] 21 day, n at 
ght.] Married to James Emmery March 27, 1790- — 
m Daniel born July 14, I79 6 - 

Jeremy, my Second Son, was Born Oct'r ye 30th, 1770 
•out n at night ; first quarter [moon] 26 day, n forenoon, 
nd married to Darkes Lumbard, December the 21, 1791. 
nd their first Daughter was born December 25, 1795. 
Betty, my 2d Daughter, was Born Fryday night, about 
n o'clock, December ye nth Day, 1772; full mo*»n 10 
l Y» 00 57 morning. Married March the 30, 1794, Chris- 
pher Dun : her first son was Born Febuary the 3, 1795 ; 

>remy 

Esther, my 3d Daughter, was Born Fryday. ye 24th of 

eb'y, 1775, about n at night. Last quarter, 23 day, 

morning. And married to Joseph Watterhouse, Sep- 

;mber the 13, 1795 ; their first Son w T as born January the 

, 1796- 

Anna, my fourth Daughter, was Born tuesday, the 
econd of September, About half-after-one Clock in the 
fternoon, 1777. New Moon 1 day, n morning. And 
)ied December 17, 1793, at 2 in afternoon. Aged 16 years 

months, & 15 Days. 



38. MOSES GOODWIN. 

Lois, my fifth Daughter, was born October the 9th, 
1779, Saturday, half past six in the Afternoon. New 
Moon 9 dav, 00 35 minutes, afternoon. 

George, my third Son, was born January the 11 day, 
1784, About 12 ©'Clock, Sunday night. 

Sarah's first Son was born 1790, March the 27, Saturday 
morning, near Sun Rise. 

Betty's Second Son was born May 5, 1796, Nathaniel ; 
their 3d Son was born June 17, 1798, George ; Joshua, 
their 4th Son. born March the 9, 1800. 

Esther's Second Son was born July. 25, 1797, and died 
August 19, 1797. Their third & fourth Sons, twins. — 
Joseph & benjamin, born February 17, 1799 ; Joseph died 
September the 9, 1800. 

Sarah's first Daughter was born August 28, 1797. 

Jeremy's first Son was born 1797, January the 28 ; 

Martha, their Second daughter, was born September the 
10, 1798 ; 

May the 28, 1800, Edmond, the Second Son was Born, 
and died November 27, 1800 ; — 

Jeremy, — his wife Dorcas, died May 11. 1801. 



Remembered as one of the Leading Citizens of Eliot. 

Moses Goodwin was born in Eliot, January 29. 1815 ; 
married Margaret Kennard ; died March 7. 1893. 

In early life he learned the trade of ship carpenter, with 
Capt. Samuel Badger, on Badger's Island, near the Ferry 
Landing in Kittery. 

He worked many years at his trade, in several different 
yards ; among them the Hanscom yard, — now Green Acre. 
In the Hanscom yard, he was employed on the renowned 
ship, — Nigh ting a le . 

By many he was called "Capt. Moses ;" having been 
commissioned by Gov'r John Fairfield, in 1840, as Capt. 
of Co. A, Cavalry, First Division, First Brigade of the 
Maine Militia. 



TH£ INDIAN MOUND. 39- 

He held many Town and County offices ; among them : 

Town Clerk, 

Selectman, . 

Town Treasurer, 

Tax Collector, 

Representative to the Legislature, 

County Treasurer. 
He was a man ol sterling character and integrity ; 
remembered as one who had clear and wise perceptions 
of Eliot's welfare; his public duties were safely and sen- 
sibly performed. His business career also, was conducted 
with the wisdom that gave him a successful life. 



TLnVxan Bixumb. 

Near the Eliot B. and M. Station 

About twenty-five years ago, Samuel Clark, a resident of 
Eliot, Wis grading the land near his family burying 
ground. He decided to level a large knoll; and thus 
make the land more easy of cultivation. 

When he had removed several feet, in extent, of the 
earth, he was greatly surprised to find at the depth of two 
feet, — a quantity of ashes, a hearth ; and upon closer in- 
vestigation, Indian relics ; among them, pipes, two quaint 
brass spoons with round bowls, curiously wrought handles 
and several Indian arrow heads. The spoons were sup- 
posed to be of Dutch make. 

The ashes Mr, Clark hauled away, and spread over the 
land ; and it was then he discovered the hearth of stone, 
about twenty- feet in diameter. 

There was no doubt that the mound was originally a 
part of an Indian winter encampment ; and there were six 
other mounds near ; one of them, also, had pipes., spoons, 
and other Indian relics. One of the spoons Mr. Clark 
gave to Dr. Willis, Editor of Old Eliot. 

The locition of this Indian Camp, was on the high 
ground, ow~e^ n^w by Raymond Clark, (son of Samuel.) 



40. , HISTORIC IT*MS. 

It is at the head waters of Sturgeon Creek, on the north- 
east side of the B. and M. Railroad, near Eliot station. 

Very near this large mound, is an interesting deposit of 
red mineral paint. Probably the Indians used this in 
their personal decoration. 

These indications of a long ago settlement of aborigines, 
near our B. & M. Station, give a historic and traditional 
interest to the locality. Imagination can picture the crude 
residents ; and the long ago tents that sheltered from 
winter's storms and chills ; and thus the very land is a 
monument of crowded imaginations. 
o 

Historic Items. [Gathered by William Fogg.] 

Capt. Gosnold, one of the Counsel of Virginia ; he died, 
August 22, 1607. 

Sir Ferdinaudo Gorges, thirty years of age in 1605. He 
died 1646. 

Capt. John Smith, born 1579. Died in London, 1631, 
aged 52 years. 

Thomas Cam mack, in this county, 1633 ; he died, 1643. 
Henry Joselyn married his widow. Cammack lived 
on Prants Neck, Scarborough. 

Spurvvink was the settlement near Richmond's Island. 
It was the seat of Robert Trelawnay, who came over 
and had a grant of nearly all the lands in Cape Klisa- 
beth ; and of the lands on the neck of Casco, and 
extending some distance into the country. 

Capt John Hill of Berwick, had a brother Samuel in 
Rowley, in 1691 ; their father and mother living. 

John Hill was a Captain of a large Company, principally 
from Massachusetts, stationed at Fort Mary in Saco, 
from April 21 to Septem'r 5. 1693. He had a company 
•there Nov. 1694, eight of whom were from Wells, and 
the rest from Massachusetts, being 29. He was at 
Fort Mary, at Saco. Nov'r, 1699, and in June, 1694. 
Capt. stationed at Wells August, 1693. Commanded 
Saco Fort, Dec'r 1692, Maj. Francis Hook then at 
Kittery. 



ADVENT CHURCH. 41. 

2L!;b ©litff J§BMmb 3ftbx>2nf (EIjurrFr. 

The Second Advent Church, of Kliot, had a pleasant 
hough rural begining : Oliver Athorne and his wife, — 
klary T. [Hammond] Athorne,— -an estimable woman, 
rith the gift of exhortation and earnest effort, came to 
k>uth Eliot, in the early sixties. 

They were of the Advent Faith, and soon commenced 
aeetings. There was at the time no hall or church easily 
>btained ; but the interest of Mr. and Mrs. Athorne was 
,otrue and sure, that they announced meetings to be acid 
n Solomon Staples grove. 

The new movement speedily became a theme of conver- 
sation ; and so many assembled, that during the summer 
nonths of the three following years, the services were 
rontinued. People came both curiously and in earnest, 
lot only from Eliot homes, but from Berwick, Kittery, 
Poitsmouth, — and the near towns. 

Several ministers were secured, officiating at different 
:itnes ; and it is remembered that one was a colored preach- 
er, named Champlin ; he at once became a curiosity as 
well as a spiritual assistance ; and a vtry large assembly, 
gathered beneath the trees ; and his exercises continued 
several days. 

At the close of the third summer, the Advent meetings 
had become surely established ; and the Christian Chapel 
was eventually secured, as will be seen by the records of 
this sketch. When the Chapel was secured, Joseph White, 
Frank Burbank, Hiram Munger, Pratt, and two or three 
others, were among the first to come to the pulpit. 

These Chapel meetings were continued, and pulpit sup- 
plies were obtained ; and then came a desire on the part of 
several to acknowledge faith in the views that had been 
unfolded. 

Among the first to embrace Advent doctrines, — so 
called, — were, George W. Brown, who held a Local 
Preachers license with the Methodists, and Charles W. 
Dixon. Others were added from time to time. 



42.. ADVENT CHURCH. 

In 1868, they were blest with a stirring revival ; it so 
increased their number, that meetings were regularly held 
with only a verbal organization and transient preaching, 
until 1884. 

Mr. Athorne and Mrs. Athorne, labored and sacrificed as 
the promoters of the Faith, until re-enforcement came. 
Then, as Mr. Brown was a licensed preacher and a class 
leader, they looked to him to take the lead of the meetings. 
Mr. Brown was ordained to the labors of the Ministry 
by the Advent Christian Conference, at Alton Bay Camp 
Meeting, in 1864; and has served with the .Eliot people 
until 1909. 

The Second Advent Christian Church was organized 
March 9, 18S4, by H. L. Hastings, of Boston, with eleven 
enrolled members ; 

Joseph H. Dixon, Secretary ; 

Thaddeus Knight, Treasurer. 
The Elders have been, — 

George W. Brown, 

Samuel Dixon. 
The Deacons have been, — 

John C. Staples, 

Albert J. Knight. 
Other members were enrolled later. 

The building of the 

Second Advent Christian Church : — 

The Christian Chapel, in which they worshipped, was 
built in 1845-6 ; and was dedicated March 20, 1846. The 
dedicatory sermon was preached by Elder Mark Fernald ; 
and the prayer of consecration was offered by Elder George 
Moore Payne, — both of Kittery. 

In 1886, the Chapel was very much out of repair. A 
number of the Christian brethren, who helped build the 
Chapel, had embraced the Second Advent faith ; and with 
the consent of the leading men who built the Chapel, it 
was thought wise to tear down and build anew. 

Samuel Dixon obtained an estimate of the stock required 



ADVENT CHURCH. , 43. 

for the Church, and sent down east, and had it brought in 
a schooner, and laid on the wharf, before any money 
was subscribed. 

The lot of land was enlarged, by additions bought of 
C. H. Brown. 

The people of South Eliot and vicinity, seeing they were 
in earnest, contributed generously, both in money and 
labor. 

When it was built, it was thought to be worth $1500 ; 
with two hundred dollars not paid. Before the dedication 
service, the two hundred dollars were collected by sub- 
scription. The Church was dedicated, free of debt, April 
7, 1887, Elder William H. Mitchel of Kennebunk, preach- 
ed the Dedication Sermon ; Eider George M. L,ittle of 
N. H. offered the Prayer of Consecration. 

From this time onward to the close of 1892, the Church 
was irregularly supplied by sixty-six different preachers. 
Then. January 5, 1893, Albert L Hill was ordained 
Pastor of the Church ; and served one year. 

In 1894, George W. Brown was elected Pastor; and has 
continued in the position till now, 1909. 

The Building Committee consisted of — 
George W. Brown, 
Samuel Dixon, 
Richard F. Dixon. 



Charles Frost, 1676: — 

Charles Frost served as Captain in the Expedition 
eastward, from February 1, to March 9, 1676. 
Richard Waldron was Commander-in-Chief. 



Samuel Cutts, 1698 : — 

October 15, 1698. Samuel Cutts, died, after one wccL's 
illness. 



44' PROMINENT MEN. 

©f^r Pmmmtni Wttn af Jxxmtx Bags. 

Hon. Ichabod Cole. 

Hon. Ichabod Cole was born in South Eliot, July 12, 
1818, and died February 14, 1904. He was the son of 
Ichabod and Anna Cole. 

His mother, Anna (Brooks,) was twice married ; she 
was the widow of Elijah Varney, and then became the 
wife of Ichabod Cole and the mother of the Hon. Ichabod 
whom we now commemorate. 

The name, Ichabod, was perpetuated in the family for at 
least three generations ; it was borne by Hon. Ichabod. 
and by his father, and his grandfather. 

Of the grandson we gather memories of an interesting 
and valued life : — 

Mr. Cole became a student in early days; and applied 
himself diligently, as one working his way. In his teens 
he followed fishing, and became sufficiently acquainted to 
take charge of a vessel, and acquired the title, Capt. Cole. ■ 

November 23, 1841, he married Miss Mary Rogers Teth- 
erly ; and there were born, six sons and three daughters. 

By devoting his spare time to study, he soon qualifitd 
himself to teach ; and then, for a number of years, he 
taught school in his own town and in his own district, in 
winter season ; and fished in the summer. This continued 
until he was required at the Navy Yard as a laborer. 

After a short time at the Yard, he was promoted to the 
oifice and made Constructer Clerk ; and continued to serve 
until after the Civil War. Also he performed duties in 
the Equipment department. - '..-.) 

He was Constructer Clerk again, during Mr. Cleave- 
land's first term. 

In 1871, May 2, he went to Baltimore, Md. and remained 
a full year, still doing clerical work with Government 
Contractor Booze. 

In 1876, he went to Washington, where he served as 
private Secretary to the late Hon. Frank Jones for four 
years. 



FROMINJUfT Mim. 45. 

He was Senator one term, (1872,) in the Maine 
legislature. 

He served his town on the board of Selectmen for some 
years; and was one of the School Committee from 1871 to 
1S78, inclusive. 

He became a member of Piscataqua Lodge, I. O. O. F. 
in Portsmouth, in early manhood, and his membership 
continued through life. 

In politics he was a true Democrat, of the Jeffersonian 
type. 

In religion he was liberal minded, and attended the 
preaching services of the church quite regularly in the 
prime of life. He willingly heard all theories and preach- 
ers ; but n-ver made any profession of Christianity. 

He was, indeed, a good citizen, always interested in 
governmental affairs. 

He was a well read man in English Literature, especially 
the poets, Po^e and Cowper, and he took much pleasure 
in quoting. 

He was pleasant and agreeable company, ready to con- 
verse on any topic that might be introduced ; in short he 
was a useful man in his day and generation. 

Ichabod Cole's Children ; date of birth: 

George Clifford Cole, Sept. 12, 1842. 

Ichabod Cole, July 18, 1844. 

Frank Cole, Nov. 10, 1846. 

Charles Hamilton Cole, January 30, 1849. 

Anna Cole, August 15, 1851 ; married Charles H. 
Dixon ; he died June 5, 1894. 

Hannibal Hamlin Cole, December 30, 1853. 

Susan Cole, July 12, 1856 ; married Joshua Vaughn. 

John Howard Cole, Sept. 17, 1859. 

Florence Cole, Sept. 12, 1862 ; married John Grant. 
An interesting family group ; nine children, — seven of 
them are now over Fifty years of age ; and two are almost 
Fifty. Fifty Years, and no break in the family. All are 



46. PROMINENT MEN. 

living now, — December 18, 1908. • ' 

The oldest and the youngest of the children were born 
just twenty years apart, to a day. 

George W. Brown. 



Hon. Alexander Junkins. 

The Hon. Alexander Junkins was born in York, York 
County, Me., Sept. 9, 1813. He was the son of Alexander 
and Judith (Moulton) Junkins. 

He attended the district school in his youth, but was 
largely self-educated. 

At the age of seventeen years, he began to learn the 
trade of tanner and currier; serving three years as appren- 
tice in Eliot ; during which time he received for his ser- 
vices, his board and clothes. 

After working a year in $aco, Me. he went to Boston, 
where he was employed at his trade two years. 

He then went to Berwick. Me. where he opened a tan- 
nery which he conducted for a period of eighteen years; 
finally selling out and removing to Eliot. 

In Eliot he was principally engaged in farming. 

In 1887, he went to Greenland, where he resided until 
his last illness, — April, 1900. 

Mr. Junkins was prominent in public affairs. He served 
in the Maine Legislature in 1848 ; again in 1850. In 1856 
he was a member of the Senate ; Sheriff of York Connty 
three years ; Selectman several years. He was elected 
Moderator more than fifty times. After his removal to 
Greenland, he was elected Representative from that town, 
in 1894; being the oldest man in the House. 

In his political opinions he was a Democrat. 
April 1837, Mr. Junkins was united in matrimony 
-with Elizabeth L. Staples, who was born in Eliot, in 1818. 

'With truth it can be said, that Alexander Junkins lived 
a life of uprightness, integrity, and his name will ever 
arouse pleasant recollections of a happy, genial disposi- 
tion ; with a kindly word to all, for he called every man 
his friend. 



OLD EUOT. 47* 

Although quiet, with no desire for display, he en- 
joyed thoroughly the political preferences which were 
awarded bim ; and few there are who can more keenly 
enjoy a hearty, practical joke, nor acknowledge their 
appreciation by a merrier twinkle than could he, to the 
very end of his life. 

He certainly has left behind a memory honored and 
honorable; faithfully won by a long life of usefulness and 
sterling rectitude. 

— ! o — 

Indian Names : — 

Piscataqua, or Piscataway, signified Right-angle. 
Piscataquack Plantation : the English name, — Kittery, 

also, Kittery, Eliot. 
Newichawanock, or the Parish of Unity, or Precinct of 

Berwick, Town of Berwick, South Berwick, North 

Berwick, 
(juampagan in Kittery, South Berwick village. 
Newichawanack River, the South Berwick River. 
Sunkaradunk, Sagadahack, River Kennebunk. 
Arrowsick, near the mouth of the Kennebunk. 
Sperwink, small river at Cape Elisabeth. 
Winiconsett, Hampton. 

William Fogg paper. 

o 

Interesting House Record : 

The Mary and Susan Hammond residence, now owned 
by Myra and Mary Hammond : This home was built by 
Thomas Hammond : 

And Thomas Hammond married Mary Rogers, tHe 
daughter of the First Eliot Minister. The publishment 
of this marriage is dated, March 20, 1756. 

Doubtless it was a pleasant memory to VI ary Rogers 
Hammond that not only was her fathr a minister, but her 
grandfather and her great-grandfather had been pastors 
of the church at Ipswich, Mass.; her great-grandfather 
coming from a church in England to Ipswich in iZ^ ; ana 



48. ©i,D mo$. 

lie was the son of a renowned English clergyman whose 
grave is marked today with a large old-fashioned head- 
stone and his pulpit still preserved in an ante-room of the 
meeting-house as a valuable and interesting relic. 

— — — o ~ 

A deed or grant of land, written two hundred and twenty- 
seven years ago, including the name of an Eliot family, 
— the ancient quill is not wholly readable to-day, but as 
a relic, the page is vaiuable : — 

Grant of Land, 

To Daniel Fogg, 1682, 

at Scarborough, Maine. 

17. 3, 1682. We the Select men of Scarbra, do give 
and grant 30 acors of land : 'to Daniel Fog : lying above 
richard Kendal, in the claims near Anthone Leby's lort, 
and 4 acors of Swomp where he nay make choyce of it in 
Commons; and 2 acors of eldor Swamp joyning to that 

marsh that Mark , now improves. 

John jackson, 
William burrough, 
Charles Abbott. 



HISTORICAL PRESS, 

William Fogg House, 

Old Road, 

ELIOT, MAINE. 



OLD ELIOT. 

Dr. J. L. M. WILLIS, Editor. 
VOL. IX. ELIOT, MAINE, April-June, 1909. No. II. 

prsf, Wioztz ©nxx&l) Jaxrnn. 

The Electrical Pioneer. 

It was sung years ago by a writer of verse : 

Some names forever live, — 
and one of these names surely may be found in the records 
of Kliot. And of this name it was said on a public 
occasion : " All Americans shouid feel proud of him to 
whom it belonged." The name is, — 

Moses Gerrish Farmer, 
who, in early manhood, was the Principal of Kliot Acad- 
emy ; and in later years, chose this town as his own 
pleasant home ; and his grave is with us. His wife also, 
widely known, and still remembered for her wonderful 
kindliness and sympathy for everybody, was one of our 
most renowned daughters ; and will never be forgotten. 

Of Moses G. Farmer much has been written : and much 
remains to be unfolded and published; and though years 
multiply since his departure, yet more and more recog- 
nition will be given to his life-works, his wonderful dis- 
coveries and inventions, and his singular perception of 
electric powers, never before grasped, even by the most 
skilful and scientific. A printed paragraph once read : 

M Farmer, the embodiment Of mechanical ingenuity, 

engineering instinct and electrical insight." 

A brief glance at his singular and most genial life, will 
give his name and fame fresh revival. And the present 
year,— 1909, — brings us to the Fiftieth Anniversary of his 

Lighting the First Electric Lamp; 

and, sure we are, that the anniversary day will also give 
new revelations of his wonderful grasp of wonderful things. 



SO - MOSES GERRISH FARMER. 

His many records and manuscripts, together with the 
printed pages and paragraphs of past years, will, if 
searched, give many glimpses of his singular unfoldings 
of the powers that had been hidden for ages. 

We can give but brief and simple glances : 

He was born at Boscawen, N. H. February 9, 1820. 

His ancestral lines were of genealogical interest : 

Col. Moses Gerrish, of Newberry, whose name he bore, 
married Jane Sewall. And Jane was the sister of the 
Judge Sewall who presided at the Court that condemne d 
the witches. The Sewalls were the ancestors of his mother. 

His grandmother Farmer was a Russell, — a lineal de- 
scendant of Lord William Russell, whose pathetic excecu- 
tion, in the Tower of London, is a page of history ; and 
whose saintly wife, the Lady Rachel, was an honor to the 
faith and integrity of the true life. 

Another member of his ancestral family, was Nathan 
Hale, the heroic youthful spy of the Revolution. 

His father was Col. John Farmer, of Boscawen, N.' H. 
He had large lumber interests, an 1 naturally desired 
Moses, his eldest son, to carry them forward;, and at his 
death, he thus arranged his estate. 

But Moses, the son, had his heart fixed on an academic 
and collegiate course. This he expressed to his guardian, 
who at once refused to let him have his share of the fath- 
er's property. But his mother, with the true perception of 
her son's interests, said she would devote her share of the 
property to his educational welfare. 

His early childhood revealed what his later years 
would be : 

At four years of age he had learned forty of the hymns 
of Watts, (church collection ;) and he made himself a pair 
of "wheel skates," and rolled himself over the floor and 
along the path. It may have been a foregleam of the 
Electric Car, of 1847, that wheeled itself in the Town Hall 
of Dover, the city where he then was teaching school. 

At nine years of age he 'had mastered," as he expressed 
it, Colburn's Arithmetic, the terror of the children of fifty 



MOSES GERRISH FARMER. 51 

years ago ; and then came Adam's new Arithmetic, and in 
two winters he lay that on the shelf. Day's Algebra and 
Flint's Surveying came next ; and at twelve years he 
could survey fields and measure inaccessible heights. 

And at twelve years he entered Boscawen Academy. 

At thirteen years he was studying Ferguson's Astronomy 
and calculating eclipses; making instruments through 
which he could observe them, lying upon his back in an 
emply trough. 

Allusion has been made to his desire for an Academic 
course of study; and after the studies at Boscawen, he 
went to fhe widely known Audover school, — the Phillips 
Academy. In later years he would smilingly tell of an 
innocent carelessness and its results ; and any one who 
attended the said schsoi in the years of long ago, will 
doubtless have a reviving of similar memories : — 

One day Moses failed in the recitation, and was sent to 
his room by Dr. Taylor. A little later, Dr. T. came to 
the room; and as he drew near, the voice of song, not of 
study, greeted his ear. He opened the door and, in his 
very impressive and unforgetable voice, said : "Farmer, 
you are disappointing the hopes of your best friends." 

The youthful student was instantly hushed ; and a 
thoughtful breath stole over him ; and as he recalled it in 
later years, he said : " That moment was the turning 
point of my life." 

He made rapid progress at Andover, and entered 
Dartmouth in the class of 1840, with the same success in 
his course of studies. 

After his graduation from Dartmouth, he was prostrated 
with typhoid fever, which had a singular effect upon his 
musical ability : Previous to this attack he had wondrous 
skill at piano and organ ; and also sang a gre^at deal ; but 
as the fever left him, he had but slight remembrance of 
tunes. And this condition strangely marked the end of 
his musical career. 

Immediately after his recovery, he became the Principal 
of Eliot Academy. Then followed a few years at a school 



52 MOSES GBRRISH FARMER. 

in Dover, N. H. * And while in Dover, his singular ingen- 
uity not only led him to pursue studies of Electric and 
Magnetic influence, but he invented novel Window Shades, 
that were so eagerly sought for, that he was led to invent 
the machine to make them. 

And the year following, (1846-7,) he brought to light 
the wonderful power and possibility of Electricity as a 
motive power, by running a Car in the Dover Town Hall. 

Ane yet again, the evenings of the first week in July, 
1859, he Lighted the Electric Lamps in his parlor at Salem, 
(Pearl street.) And they were evenings of pleasantness 
to invited friends. The Mayor of the City and his Coun- 
cillors were present the first evening ; wise people looked 
with interest upon the results of his wonderful brain. — 
And when the first week in July comes, 1909, the Fiftieth 
Anniversary of this event will be observed in Salem, 

Prof. Dolbear, Ph. D. Tufts College, in 1897, at Green 
Acre, the Fiftieth Anniversary of Prof. Farmer's " Demon- 
strating the possibility of Utilizing Electricity as a Motive 
Power, by running a car in Dover, propelled by that 
agent," gave the following list of Prof. Farmer's revela- 
tions of the hidden powers. To read them will give the 
revelations of the man whose face was once familiar to us, 
and whose residence in Eliot was only pleasantness and 
gladness to those who frequently met him. 

Prof. Dolbear said : — 

At 26 years of age, (1846) Prof. Farmer had built an 
Electric Railroad. 

At 28 he had improved the Telegraph. 

At 30 he had invented and constructed the Fire 
Alarm system with water-power driven dynamos. 

At 35 he had discovered the means for duplex and 
quadruplex Telegraph. 

At 36, the art of depositing aluminum electrolytically. — 
At this age he read a Paper before the American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science on Multiplex Tel- 
egraphy. 



MOSES GERRISH PARMER. 53 

At 39 he had lighted his parlor, No. n Pearl St. Salem, " 
vith incandescent lamps. 

At 44 he had greatly improved thermo-electric generators. 

At 46 he had invented the modern dynamo with self- 
xciting field. 

At 48 he had lighted a house at Cambridge with forty 
ucandescent lamps in multiple circuit and self-registering. 

[And no wonder Prof. Dolbear added : — ] 
1 Let us see to it that Prof. M. G. Farmer be honored as an 
American Electrical Pioneer/' 

And yet more we glean from Prof. Dolbear : 

"There is good reason for believing that the introduc- 
ion of the Condenser into telegraph work, which so 
norruously increased the working capacity of the line, 
pas his invention." 

" I can but repeat what was said of him by Gov. Clafflin 
>f Massachusetts, who knew him well, — 'He was deserv- 
ng or more honor than he ever received.' " 

Among the multiplied papers of Prof. Farmer, is the 
he letter that conveyed to him the regard and honor of 
lis former Collegiate home : — 

Dartmouth College, July 30, 1853. 
vly Dear Sir : 

I have the pleasure to inform you that the 
rrustees of this College, at the late Commencement, 
•onferred on you the honorary Degree of Master of Arts. 
I am, very respectfully, 

Your obed't serv't, 
VIr. Moses G. Farmer. N. Lord. 

The last nine years of Prof. Farmer's active life, were 
>pent in the service of the Government as Electrician at 
it the U. S. Torpedo Station, Newport, R. I. 

His family removed with him to a cottage at the Station, 
ind it was a season of good cheer, though remote from the 
>ld friends and fellowships. 

After nine years atthe Station, he resigned, and the Eliot 



54 MOSES GJBRRISH FARMER. 

home became the comfort and delight of the household. 

But sorrows came. His wife departed this life; — after 
y.ears of scattering kindness and goodness to everybody, 
and winning the love of the rich, the poor, the happy souls 
and the sorrowing ones, she was with inexpressible grief 
laid upon the pillow of the grave. Her departure was 
June 27, 189:. 

Prof. Farmer, though frail in body, w r ent, with his 
daughter, to Chicago on a visit, where he died, May 25, 
1893, — sixteen years ago. He fell asleep with a smile on 
his face, and a gentle grasp of his daughter's hand. 

His coffined body was brought to Boston. At Dr. Hale's 
church there were services, three clergymen beside Dr, H. 
participating. The honorary Pall-bearers were : 

Commodore Thomas O. Selfridge, U. S. N. Command- 
ant, Boston Navy Yard ; 

Mr. Franklin Leonard Pope, New York ; 

Prof. B. A. Gould, Astronomer of the Argentine Re- 
public ; 

Prof. Elihu Thomson, of Lynn ; 

Mr. Charles F. Washburn, of Worcester ; 

Mr. Horatio G. Parker, — Prof. Farmer's classmate at 
Dartmouth ; 

Mr. J. G. Thorpe, Cambridge ; 

Mr. Frank Wilson, representing the Commercial 
Cable Company. 

At the close of the Church services, the sorrowing ones 
conveyed the remains to the Eliot home; and the grave 
received him. The family lot in the grounds of the 
Bittersweet home is the resting place of Prof. Farmer and 
the widely loved wife; and not a summer rolls by but 
the memories of the sacred spot revive, and flowers are 
scattered there. 



EARLY HANSCOMS. 55 

Hanscoms of the Long Ago. 

Copied from a Note Book. 
oh Hanscom, weaver of Kittery, — 

sells to Thomas Hanscom, his nephew, the "Eldest Son 
\ my Brother, Thomas Hanscom, late of Kittery, dec'd, — 

Ye house & lands of Thomas Hanscom, my father, Late 
( Kittery, dec'd, with all ye priviledges & appurtenances 
lere unto belonging, with ye revercon & revercons, re- 
tainder and remainders, rents, Issues & profits there of, 
'o have & To hold unto him, ye sd Thomas Hanscom," 
:c, — and on the 17th of February, Moses Hanscom con- 
eyed also "forever, all my rights" in the same property 
) the sd Thomas Hanscom, eldest son of my brother 
'honias, late of Kittery, dec'd. 

1706-7, March 2, Tobias Hanscom, of Dover, son-in-law 
t Martha Lord, of Kittery. 

1717, Moses and Samuel Hanscom witness a deed of 
braham Morrell of Kittery, 

Reconed, 2d Augst, 1688, with Mr. Robert Eliot, on ye 
reat Island, and there rest due to him from me, Thomas 
[anscom, Sen'r, ye Sum of Seventeen pounds, Twelve 
lillings. Test : Nicho. Heskins. 

There is also due to Mr. Eliot, on my ..Son Thomas 
[anscom, Jun'r, his Acco't, ye Sum of four pounds, 
even Shillings. 

Recorded According to ye Original, April 16th, 1714. 

p : Jos : Hammond, Reg. 

Thomas Hanscom, Sen'r, hath Credit on Mr. Robert 
Hot's Book, for 30 ps. Timb'r, fetcht by Mr. Nathan'll 
ryer, about Novemb'r, 1688. Contents, Twenty Eight 
unns of pine Timb'r. ' Test. Nicho. Heskins. 

Recorded According to ye Original, 
April 16, 1714. 

Jan. 31, 1717. Samuel Hanscom, wit. Deed of Gift, — 
'lexand'r Dennett to his son Eben'r Dennett, Kittery. 

March 24, 1717-18. Nicholas Shapleigh, "son and heire 



56 EARTHY HANSCOMS. 

Surviveiug of my late father, John Shapleigh, sells to Mr. 
Erooks, lands bounded by Moses Hanscom, et als, near to 
ye road that goes from Capt'n Leighton's to Sturgeon 
Creek. 

May 13, 1718. Sam'l Hanscom witnesses deed of sale of 
land, of Thomas Knight to John Dennet, both of Kittery. 

Samuel Hanscom witnesses deed of sale of land, Joseph 
Nelson, Kittery, to Paul Wentworth, Dover, 1717. 

Sam'l Hutchins to Withers Berry, 1719. Witness, Moses 
Hanscom. 

Daniel Green to Joseph Hammond, Indenture, 1719.— 
Samuel Hanscom, witness. It was land "Butting on 
Piscataqua river, on ye South west," — part by ye Cove 
behind ffranks ffort ; & in part ye Land of Thomas 
Hanscom. 

Hannah Hanscom, grandaughter of Charles Nelson, now 
deceased. October 10, 1719. 

Daniel ffogg, jr. Ann?, my wife, being one ye Daught'rs 
and Coheirs of Thomas Hanscom, late of Kittery, dec'd, 

rec'd of Thomas Hanscom, our brother, — Quitclaimed 
unto him, &c. 

David Libbey, jr., married Esther Hanscom, daughter 
of Thomas Hanscom and sister of Thomas Hanscom, jr., 
and grandaughter of Thomas Hanscom. 17*9- 

o 

Tobey. The first person by the lame of .Tobey, who 
resided in Eliot, was James Tobey, son of Thomas Tobey. 

Thomas migrated from England to Long Island about 
1640. He eventually settled at Sandwich, Cape Cod. 

James Tobey the son, was born in Sandwich, and came 
to Eliot about 1675. His home was near Franks Fort. 



Mett$\a$t% i CDptBb fcvm t&lvsi Hscorba. 

1810. Eliot Incorporated as a Town. 

1810. 
June 2. EHakim Staples and Mary Neal, of Eliot. 
June 14. Thomas Worster and Dorcas Ferguson, Eliot. 
July 6, William Mclntire of York and Hannah 

Leighton, of Eliot. 
September 17, William Kennard of Boston and 

"Margery Leighton, of Eliot. 
October 20, Samuel Davis and Eunice Whittum, of Eliot. 
October 28, Thomas Hanscom and Abigail Foster, of Eliot 
December 2, Capt. Charles Frost and Sarah Johnson, 

both of Eliot. 
December 18, Josiah Williams of Kittery and Maria Shaw 

of Eliot. 
1S11. 
January 28th, John Russell and Olive Goodwin, Eliot. 
January 31. Moses Wherang and Love Paul, of Eliot. 
April 10, Samuel Spinney and Nancy Staples, of Eliot. 
May 4, Tobias Shapleigh and Betsey Shapleigh, of Eliot. 
May 31, John Nason, of Berwick, and Apphia Hanscom 

of Eliot. 
September 30, Samuel Tetherly and Olive Spinney, Eliot 
October 10, Joseph Hussey, of Barrington, and Nancy 

Spinney, Eliot. 
Octobe 13, Simeon Emery and Lydia Emery, Eliot. 
November 20, Joseph Frost and Dorcas Bartlett, Eliot. 
Nov'r 20, Samuel Roberts of Alfred and Patience 

• Ferguson, of Eliot. 
November 29, Nath'l Clark, Philipsburg, and Betsey 

Frost, Eliot. 

1812. 
February 2, John Merrill of New Salem, and Hannah 

Hill, of Eliot. * 
May 24, Charles Hodson, Portsmouth, and Harriet 
Staples, Eliot. - 



58 MARRIAGES. 

1812 co?itimied. 
May 31, Oliver Trevett, of Bath, and Sophia Eeighton of 

Eliot. 
June 11, Stephen Hanscom and Abigail Garland, Eliot. 
August 10, Mark Rernick and Miriam Rait, Eliot. 
August 16, Jacob Morrell and Sally Bartlett, Eliot. 
October 11, Joseph Grover, of York, and Dorcas 

Seavey, Eliot. 
November 14, Samuel Welch and Sally Spinney, Eliot. 
December 24, Hugh Kenison, jr. and Sarah Bartlett, Eliot. 

1813. 
February 9, Morris Goodwin and Dorcas Paul, Eliot. " 
April 8, James Warren and Catherine Nutter, Eliot. 
April 8, Richard Shapleigh and Olive Tobey, Eliot. 
May 2, Joseph Welch, of York, and Phcebe Furbish, Eliot. 
June 13, Nath'l Paul and Eydia Kennard, Eliot. 
September 26, Jonathan Leighton and Sally Knight, Eliot. 
Oct. 14, Dr. Caleb Emery and Mary Ann "Chandler, Eliot. 
Oct. 21, Theophilus Simpson and Abigail Goodwin, Eliot. 
Oct. 2i, Dea. Jeremiah Lovett, of York, and Sally 

Hanscom, Eliot. 
Oct. 24th, Isaac Remick, jr. and Mary Staple, Eliot. 
Nov. 4, James Cook, of York, and Maria Simpson, Eliot. 
Nov. 4, Timothy Spinney and Sarah Hammond, Eliot. 
Nov. 14, Htzekiah Staple and Mary Witham, Eliot. 
Nov. 25, Theodore Stover and Hannah Thompson, 

both of York. 
Nov. 28, George Pierce, of Portsmouth, and Susan Frye, 
of Eliot; 

1S14. 
January 28th, William Hanson, of Dover, and Hannah 

Simpson, of Eliot. 
February 10, Daniel Abbot, of Berwick, and Betsey 

W T orkman, of Kittery. 
March 17, Samuel Kennard and Mary Fogg, Eliot. 
April 10, James Hubbard and Sally Paul, Eliot. 
April 11, Reuben Woodward, of Boston, and Lucretia 

Berdeen, of Eliot. 



EUOT MARRIAGES. 59 

1 8 14 continued. 
April 17, Nicholas Scammond and Sally Frost, Eliot. 
May 2, George T. Patch, of Kittery, and Statira Black, 

of Eliot. 
June 23. Horace Remick and Mary W. Hammond, Eliot. 
August 7. Nath'l Hanscom, 3d, Mary Shapleigh, Eliot. 
September 14, Jonathan Ranlet, of Farmington, and 

Nancy Pettegrew, of Eliot. 
November 29, James Bartiett of Portsmouth, and Eucy 

Knowlton, of Eliot. 
November 29, Andrew Leighton and Sally Odiorn, Eliot. 
December t, Thomas L-ibbey and Sophia Hodsdon, Eliot. 
December 1, Alfred Tetherly and Hannah Staples, Eliot. 
December 5, Joseph Paul, of York, and Mary J. Frost, 

of Eliot. 

1815. 
January 1, John B. Haley, of Portsmouth and Sally Fry 

of Eliot. 
February 20, William Scammon and Lois Woodman 

of Eliot. 
March 15, Samuel Bradbury of York and Sally Hervel 

of Eliot. 
March 20, David Furbish and Mary Fry, Eliot. 
April 6, John Rait, jr. and Anna Marsh, Eliot. 
May 20.' Nath'- Adams of Newington and Lydia Tobey 

of Eliot. 
June 8. Benjamin Brown of Wakefield, and Alice 

Dixon, of Eliot. 
June n. Joseph Wherren and Eavina Paul, Eliot. 
July 2. Joseph Caul, of Kittery, and Elisabeth Black 

of Eliot. 
October 5. Capt. Richard Keating, of Portland, and 

'Miranda Emerson, of York. 
October 15. William Scriggins and Mary Buzzel, Enot. 
October 23. Benjamin Randall, of Portsmouth, and 

Elizabeth Remick, Eliot 
December 17, John Tuttle and Sally Staple, Eliot. 



60 MARRIAGES. 

1815 continued. 
December 24. Samuel Sherive, of Portsmouth, and 

Caroline Scriggins, of Eliot. 
December 29. Daniel Brooks, jr. and Elizabeth 
Remick, Eliot. 
1816. 
February 21. William Morrell and Mary Emery, -KHot. 
March 21. Joseph Smith and Mary Nason, Eliot. 
May 28. Timothy Remick and Sarah Ripley, Eliot. 
July 23. John Dennett, of Kittery, and Sh'uah Ferguson, 

of Eliot. ' 
October 25. William Baitlett and Hannah Neal, Eliot. 
November 23. William Tophers, of Kittery, and 

Lucy Scriggins, Eliot. 
December 5. John Hammond, jr. of Eliot, and 
Mary B. Paul, of Berwick. 
1817. 
January 2. Nath'l Knowlton and Rosanna Goodwin, Eliot 
January 8. Meshech Thorey and Polly Shackley, both 

of Berwick. 
January 23d. Jonathan Drew and Sarah Quint, 

of Newington. 
February 6. Jotham Woodman, Sarah Shapleigh, Eliot. 
May 20. Alpheus Hanscom and Mary Libbey, Eliot. 
May 22. William Randel and Patience Ricker, Eliot. 
June 5. Daniel P. Hammond and Sally S. Remick, Eliot 
June 29. Nathan Ferguson and Ann Goodwin, Eliot. 
July 10. David Libbey jr. and Betsey Hanscom, Eliot. 
August 8. Charles Fernald and Mary Libbey, Eliot. 
December 11. By Caleb Emery, Esq. Noah Emery of 

Eliot and Lydia Racliff, of Portsmouth. 
December 29. By Rev. SamM Chandler, Charles Parsons 
of York, and Martha Fernald, Eliot. 
1818. 
March 6. By Alfred Medcalf, Ira Paul of Eliot, and 

Mary G. Pickering, of Newington. 
May 7. Timothy Pettegrew, of Eliot, and Sally Downing 
of Newington. 



MARRIA.GES. 6l 

iSiS, continued, 

\s 14. William Remick and Dorcas Kennard, Eliot. 

ly 9. Jonathan Hanscom and Olive Ann Paul, Eliot. 

pt. 10. Charles Spinney Kittery, Eucy Staples, Eliot. 

tober 8. Eben'r Bartlett and Alice L,ibbey, Eliot. 

1S19. 

nuary 4. Abel Parker and Iyucy Tetherly, Eliot. 

nuary 7. By Rev. Samuel Chandler, — 

Oliver Hanscom and Miriam Spinney, Eliot. 
: b. 9. Capt. Nath'l Hanscom, Abigail Fernald, Eliot, 
arch 10, By Stephen Neal, Esq., — 

Eeby J. Shapleigh, Eliot, Mary Paul, York, 
arch 10. James W. Shapleigh, Hannah Eee Chandler, 
arch 21. Richard Neal and Betsey Goodwin, Eliot, 
pril 6. By Joseph Thompson, Esq. — 

William Smith and Eunice Davis, Eliot, 
pril 25. By Rev. Sam'l Chandler, 

Alpheus Hanscom and Joanna Stacey. Eliot, 
ay 18th. James Shapleigh and Statira M. Remick. 
me 3. John R. Hill and Honora Remick. 
ily 21. Ebenezer Fry, jr. and Honora Hanscom, Eliot, 
ug. 6. Richard Shapleigh, Lebanon, Shuah Ferguson, 

of Eliot, 
cto. 14, Charles Tetherly, Rebecca P. Spinney 1 ; Eliot, 
ct. 17. Henry Nutter and Hannah Marriner, Eliot, 
ovember 27. Oliver Butler, South Berwick, and 

Abba V. Odiorne, Eliot. ~ 
1820. 

inuary 10. Samuel Cater and Pamelia Paul, Eliot, 
ebruary 10. Stephen Greene, Newcastle, and 

Mary Leighton, Eliot, 
ay 3. James Hanscom and Katherine Hammond, Eliot, 
'ay 7. George Dorr of Milton, and Jane Frost, Eliot, 
ay 24. William Cole and Polly Brooks, Eliot, 
une 2. Capt John Frisbie, Kittery, and Sally Feguson, 

of Eliot, 
une 5. Elisha H. Gilman, of Brownfield, and Laura 
Hammond, of Eliot. 



62 MARRIAGKS. 

1820 continued. 
June 8. William Hanscom, jr. and Nancy Remick, [Eliot. 
July 5. Nath'l Hanscom, jr. and Betsey Fernald, Eliot. 
August 8. Nath'l S. Bartlett and Sarah Kennison, Eliot. 
October 2. George Raitt and Eliza Hamilton, Eliot. 
October 3. Daniel Knight and Nancy Remick, Eliot. 
Nov'r 28. Benjamin Welch and Mira Spinney, Eliot. 
Nov'r 29. Capt. Wentworth Fernald, Kittery, and 

Miriam Staples, Eliot. 
December 7. Joseph Hammond, 3d and Sally Frost, Eliot 
December 10, Samuel Hanscom and Maria Paul, Eliot. 

1821. 
January 16. James Libbey and Jane Libbey, Eliot. 
January 25. Thaniel Frost and Hannah Furbish, Eliot. 
February 8. Henry Card, Dover," and Abigail Lord, Eliot. 
February 20. John Hanscom and Ann Hanscom, Eliot. 
February 22. James Knowlton and Isabel Tobey, Eliot. 
March 15. Thales Downing and Sally Wallingford, Eliot 
April 12th. Ceasar Whidden, Portsmouth, and Jerusha 

Hanscom, Eliot. 
May 7. Robert Ham, of Dover, and Theodosia Gould, 

of Eliot. 
June 16. William Fogg and Betsey D. Hill, Eliot. 
October 22. Ralph S. Jordan, of Kenebunkport, and 

Abigail Leighton, Eliot. 
November 22. Samuel Brooks, 4th, and Emeline 

Staples, Eliot. 
December 20. Arthur Pettigrevv and Nancy Schriggen, 

of Eliot. 
December 23. Oliver Clark and Pardina H. Fry, Eliot. 
December 27. Joseph Newell and Ann Preble, both York 
Dec. 27, Edward Staples, jr. and Hannah Brooks, Eliot. 

1822. 
January 17. Joseph Nutter and Lydia Paul, Eliot. 
January 31. James Staples, Eliot, Mary Downing, of 

Portsmouth. ^ 

Feb. 19. Dependence Frost, Jemima L. Goodwin, Eliot. ■ 
Feb. 24. John P. Rogers, Elisabeth H. Hammond, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 63 

1822 continued. 
April 7. Charles P. Spinney and Ann R. Remick, Eliot. 
April 17. Thomas Shapleigh and Mary Hammond, Eliot. 
April 17. Eenj. Spinney and Mary Pettigrow, Eliot. 
May 3. James P. Fry and Abigail T. Varney, Eliot. 
June T5. William Odiorn and Olive Praitt, Eliot. 
June 27. Samuel Kenison and Mary P. Spinney, Eliot. 
July 21. Moses Goodwin and Alice Shapleigh, Eliot. 
August 12. Nathaniel Wentworth, of Dover, and 

Lydia Lord, of Eliot. 
October 19. Asa Brooks and Abigail Tobey> Eliot. 
November 12. Simon Staples, jr. and Sally Varney, Eliot 

1823. 
January 7. John Davis and Hannah Parsons, Eliot. 
March 20. Henry Dixon and Fanney Spiuney. Eliot. 
April 27. Oliver Remick and Isabel S. Shores, Eliot. 
May 12. Joseph Nutter and Abigail Paul, Eliot. 
May 18. By Jona'n Hammond, Esq. Tobias Fernald and 

Lucy Paul, both of Kittery. 
August. John Raitt and Betsey Ferguson, Eliot. 
Aug. 24. Capt. William Hammond and Mary Paul, Eliot 
Oct. 19. Thomas Libbey and Sarah Hammond, Eliot. 
Oct. 30. Henry Meloon, of Newcastle, and Mary 

Staple, of Eliot. 
Nov'r 15. WilHam Varney, and Martha Remick, Eliot. 

1824. 
January 6. Wm. Varney and Martha Remick, Eliot. 
January 22. Ichabod Jenkins, of York, and Eunice K. 

Varney, of Eliot. 
February 9, Ebenezer Simpson, of Saco, and Lucy 

Simpson, of Eliot. 
March 4, Archelaus Trefethern, of Kittery, and Mary 

Spinney, of Eliot. 
April 4. William Randall and Elisabeth Shapleigh, Eliot 
April 4. Francis Spinney and Mary R. Paul, Eliot. 
July 25. John Staples and Martha Scriggins, Eliot. 
Sept. 5. Daniel Furbish and Lucy L. Smith, Eliot. 
Nov'r 4. Washington Remick and Betsey Leighton, Eliot 



64 MARRIAGES. 

1824 continued . 
Nov'r 18. Remington Hutchius, of Kittery, and 

Mary Jane Wherren, of Eliot. 
December 8. Wm. Spinney and Susan Pettegrow, Eliot. 
Dec. 27. Capt. Samuel Woodman and Esther Spinney; 
of Eliot. 
1825. 
January 9. James h. Paul and Sally Seavey, Eliot. 
January 13. Stephen Seavey, Portsmouth, Lucy Spinney, 

of Eliot. 
March 23. John Goodwin and Mary E. Hill, Eliot. 
March 27. Joel Moore, of York, Susannah Frost, Eliot. 
April 17. Thomas Knight, jr. and Lydia Staples, Eliot. 
April 24. John Lunday and Mary Remick, Eliot. 
April 27. Thomas Hammond and Rosean Goodwin, Eliot 
April 28. Capt. Joseph Hill and Eliza Hammond, Eliot. 
May 20. George J. Smirt, of Portsmouth, and 

and Mary Staples, of Eliot. 
July 4. By Stephen Neal, Esq. — 

Enoch Emery and Rhoda Staples, Eliot. 
July 17. By Rev. Samuel Chandler, — 

Samuel Hanscom and Elisabeth Shapleigh, 

of Eliot. 
Japhet Emery and Hannah Leighton, Eliot 
November 8. Joshua W. Kenney, of New Orleans, and 

Hannah Knowlton, Eliot. 
November 20. Abram E. Dixon and Statira M. Spinney, 
of Eliot. 

[Nov. 15, 1823, should read] John Simpson and Mary 

Emery, of Eliot. 
December 23. Ivory Shapleigh and Sarah Chick, Eliot. 
December 25. Shadrach Weymouth, of Newburyport, 

and Sally Carter, Eliot. 
December 26. Nath'l Kennard and Miriam Fogg, Eliot. 

1826. 
January 3. Diamond Tetherly and Jane Hammond, Eliot 
January 5. Washington Brooks and Eliza Ann Skriggins 



MARRIAGES. 65 

26 continued. 

lary 20. Timothy Manson, Kittery, and 

Margaret Staples, Eliot, 
uary 11. Noah Randall and Katherine Martin, Eliot 
uary 23. Hall Ham, of Dover, Sarah Furbish, Eliot. 
:h 23. By Joseph Thompson, Esq., Arthur Caull, of 

York, and Olive Emery, Eliot. 
1 14. Thomas B. White, of Newcastle, and 

Julia Staples, of Eliot. 
1 29. Robert Martin, Dover, Martha Spinney. Eliot. 
. 25. Thomas Chick and Catherine Emery, Eliot. 

29. William Davis and Nancy H. Staples, Eliot. 

30. By William Fogg, Justice of the Peace, — 

James Tobey, jr. Mary Jane Remick, Eliot 
. 12. Henry B. Manson Kittery, Hannah Seavey, Eliot 
. 16. Chas. Lang, Stratham, Lucy Ann Hammond " 
7. By Moses Hammond, Esq. 

James Blaisdell, Lucy Mclntyre, both of York. 
*3- Josjah Spinney, Kittery, Clarissa Knight, Eliot 
17. John Fernald, Barrington, Sarah Ann Paul, Eliot 
30. Parker Foster and Sally Foster, Eliot. 

uary 4. Joseph Goold and Rosanna Goold, Eliot, 
uary 7. James Rogers and Rachel Libbey, Eliot. 
:h 8. Simon Spinney, of Eliot, and 

Olive Grover, of Portsmouth. 
:hi5. By Moses Hammond, Esq., 

Thomas Locke and Edna Grover, both of York. 
18. 
tary 9. By Rev. Charles Baker : 

John Field and Miriam Raitt, Eliot. 
Lary 13. By Rev. Charles Baker, — 

Dudley Wiggin, Somersworth, N. H. and 
Mehitable Lord, Eliot, 
lary 20. Elias Remick, and Caroline Shapleigh, Eliot 
lary 21. Nathan Junkrns, Hannah Hauscom, Eliot 
uary 10. Wm. D. Fernald and Mehitable Odiornc, 
both of Kittery. 



66 MARRIAGES. 

1828, continued, 
February 28. Moses Libbey of Somersworth, and 

Huldah Lankton, of Eliot. 
Feb. 24. Daniel Odiorne, jr. Sarah C. Kitterege, Eliot. 
March 6. John R. Hanscom, Caroline Hammond, Eliot. 
May 6. By Rev. Samuel Chandler : 

Wm. Fernald, Kittery, Sarah Ann Hanscom, Eliot. 
May 4. Washington Leach and Olive Ann Foster, Eliot. 
May. 5. Thomas Chick, jr. Louisa Lord, Eliot. 
May 30. Avah N. Rugg, of Portsmouth, and 

Olive Ann Brooks, of Eliot. 
June 2. Edmund Haggens, jr. and 

Mary Ann Hamilton, of South Berwick. 
July 27. William Hanscom, 3d, and Eunice Seavey, Eliot 
Sept. 3. Mark Spinuey and Eliza Spinney, Eliot. 
September 26. Samuel Burleigh, jr. of Lee, and 

and Lydia Kennard, of Eliot. 
September 29. Reuben Winchell, of Somersworth, and 

Sally Fernald, of Eliot. 
October 10, Levi Brooks and Shuah Leach, Eliot. 
Oct. 24. James Shipleigh, 3d. and.Lavia Remick, Eliot. 
November 17. By Rev. Oliver Barrow, of Wells : 

Thomas C. Bartlett, of Eliot, and 
Ann Donnell, of Wells, Maine. 
November iS. By Rev. Justin Spalding: 

John Langly, of York, and Sirena Field, Eliot . 
Dec. 7. Ebenezer Plaistcd, South Berwick, and 

Eunice En:ery, Kliot. 
December n. Oliver Paul and Mary P. Toby, Eliot. 
December 13. James Paul, jr. and Abigail Libbey, Eliot. 
Dec. 16. Capt. Caleb Frost and Mrs. Jane Libbey, Eliot. 
Dec. 19. Timothy Knight and Mary Ann Pinder, Eliot. 
December 21. Abner Cole, Eliot, Esther Spinney, Kittery 

1829. 
January 1. Abraham S. Jackson, of Portsmouth and 
Olive Witham, of Eliot. 
Charles Willey, of Portsmouth, and 
Frances Libbey, of Eliot. 
January 25. Joseph Goold and Betsey Goold, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 67 

1829 continued. 
February 8. Ebenezer Fry, jr. Elisabeth Tucker, Eliot. 
I May 3. By William Hammond, Justice of the Peace : 
Richard F. Dunn, of Kittery, and 
Mary Dixon, of Eliot. 
June 2. William Adams and Mercy Blaisdell, of York. 
November 12. Joseph Fisk, jr. Lexington, Mass., 

and Mary Kennard, of Eliot. 
Nov. 26. By Justin Spalding, "minister of the gospel," 

Benj. Ferguson and Mary C. Piper, Eliot. 
Nov. 26. William R. Dickson and Mary E. Cole, Eliot. 
Nov. 3. Timothy Mclntire and Sally Thompson, 

both of York, "duly joined by J. Spalding." 
December 27. Isaiah Shorey, South Berwick, and 
Patience Parsons, Eliot. 
183O. 
June 6. John H. Fernald and Polly Cole, Eliot. 
May 29. By Rev. Justin Spalding, — 

Dr. Oliver A. Jones and widow Mary Ann 
Fernald, both of Eliot. 
Dec. 15. By E. F. Newell, Ichabod Bickford, of Ports- 
mouth and Susan F. James, Eliot. 
;Dec. 20. John Fernald, of Kittery, and Sarah Ann, 
Hanscom, Eliot. 
1831. 
May 15. By Rev. Josiah F. Hawes, — 

Edward Rand, Boston, Caroline Paul, Eliot. 
May 19. By Rev. Stephen Merrill, of Kittery, — 

John Paul and Sally Hanscom, of Eliot. 
June 27. Levi Cole and Elisabeth W. Hanscom, Eliot. 
Sept. 16. John Moody, Lebanon, Mary Jane Libbey, Eliot 
Nov. 14. Wm. H. Peters, Dover, Lydia Fry, Eliot. 
Oct. 13. Thomas F. Brooks and Catherine Tobey, Eliot. 
Oct. 20. James Spinney, jr. and Ann W. Brooks. 
Nov. 7. Robert Nason and Hannah Chick. 
Nov. 15. Charles Spinney, jr. and Lucy Hanscom. 
Nov. 24. Jotham Woodman, of Eliot and 

Margaret Witherson, South Berwick. 



68 _ MARRIAGES. 

1832 

February 9. Joel Hanscom and Elisabeth Pierpont, Eliot 
June 1. Benj. F. Emery, Esq. of Berwick 

and Sophia Jenkins of Somersworth. 
June 6. William L. Kennard and Elisabeth Frost. 
September 29. John W Tucker, of Rye, and 

and Katherine Fogg, of Eliot. 
December 6. Parker Foster, and 

Mrs. Lois Thompson, Eliot. 
. December 25. Alpheus Staples and Mary Welch, Eliot. 
1833. 
February 10. Nicholas Spinney and Eleanor Cole, Eliot. 
May 12. By Rev. Ferris Fitch : — 

Reuben Frost and Eliza Ann Cole, Eliot. 
Oct. 19. Eben'r Raines of Milton, and 

Ann Maria Fernald, Eliot. 
Dec. 26. George Rogers of Palmyra and 

Mary Elisabeth Spinney, Eliot. 
1834. 
February 20. Sebastian. S. Hubbard, Concord, N. H. 

and Mary E. Staples, Eliot. 
April 27. Thomas Rue, Portsmouth, and 

Mary Ann Leighton, of Eliot. 
June 12. Joseph W. Staples and Louisa Wherren. 
One hundred and twenty of the foregoing marriages were 
solemnized by the Rev. Samuel Chandler. 

Intentions of Marriage, and the date of Publishment: 
1834. 

January 13. David Ladstone, Eliot, and Almira Freeman 

of Kittery. 
Aprtl 1. John Rogers, of Eliot, Martha Bean, Bangor. 
Aprit 13. Stephen Paul, Eliot, and Mary A. Pickering, 

of Portsmouth. 
May 24. Isaac Libby. jr. and Sarah Elisabeth Russell, 

both of Eliot. 
June 8. Joshua Grafton, of Somersworth, N. H and 
Eliza A. Morgan, Eliof. 



MARRIA.GKS. 69 

i834> Publishments, continued, 
August 17. Nath'l Goodwin and Olive G. Russell, Eliot. 
August 31. Hiram Goold, Eliot, and Lydia Burnham, 
S o me rs worth, N. H. 
I Sept. 7. Joel Woodman and Sally Spinney, Eliot. 
J Sept. 7. James A. Brooks and Eliza Jane Dixon, Eliot. 
Sept. 21. John H. Varney and Belinda Staples, Eliot. 
Sept. 27. David Spinney, jr. and Nancy Frye, Eliot. 
November 1. Jeremiah I,ibbey Julia F. Hammond, Eliot 

1835. 
January 8. Jacob Shorey, Eliot, and Jane Key, Berwick. 
February 15. Joshua Emery and Sarah Jones, Eliot. 
February 21. William Frye, Mehitable Wilkinson, Eliot. 
" Jeremiah Varney, Eliot, and 

Margaret Tibbetts, Great Falls. 
March 29. John Staples, of Eliot, and 

Mary Ann Andrews, Berwick. 
June. Parker Fernald, Kittery, Lydia H. Tuttle, Eliot, 
jjuly 12. Alexander R. Shapleigh, Susan Remick, Eliot. 
I July 19. Lyman Spinney and Lydia Staples, Eliot. 
I August 1. John Frost and Jane Graham, Eliot. 
August 20. William Plaisted, South Berwick, and 

Louisa Jane Frye, Eliot. 
August 29, Isaiah Hanscom and Sarah Cutts Frost, Eliot 
September 28. Elias Staples, Eliot, and 

Rebecca H. Remick, of Kittery. 
October 4. Daniel L. Rollins, Somersworth, N. H. 

and Martha Jane Shapleigh, Eliot. 
October 18. Stephen Hanscom, jr. Olive Hanscom, Eliot. 
Nov'r 1. John Tetherly, jr. Thankful Hanscom, Eliot. 
Nov'r 4. Ivory Bridges, York, and Phebe Varney, Eliot. 
Nov'r 8. John Smith, jr. Pittston, Mary E. Stacy, Eliot. 
Nov. 29. Dependence Shapleigh and Jane Goodwn, Eliot 
Dec'r 13. John H. Ferguson, Eliot, and 

Mary H. Meserve, Berwick. 



7° MARRIAGES. 

i836. Publishments continued : 
January 27. William Fernald, of Kittery, and 

Miriam Spinney, oj Eliot. 
February 14. JohnTuttle, Mrs. Ann R. Spinney, Eliot. 
March 13. Asa Goodwin, of Eliot, and 

Mary Ann Newell, of Somersworth. 
April 13. Joseph Davis, of Portsmouth, and 

Roxana Tetherly, of Eliot. 
June 26. Daniel Goodwin, of Bangor, and 

Jane H. Libbey, of Eliot. 
June 26. Ivory Goodwin, of Bangor, and 

Elisabeth Hill, of Eliot. 
July 17. Otis Wakefield, of Reading, Mass. and 

Abigail. T. Hammond, of Eliot. 
September 17. Asa Gowen, Charleston, Maine, and 

Mary Jane Emery, Eliot. 
Nov'r 6. Elisha Grover, of Eliot, and 

Adaline S. Moulton, of York. 
William H. Hammond, of Boston, and 
Mary Jane Hanscom, of Eliot. 
Nov'r 7. Benjamin Sherburn, of Somersworth, and 
Hannah Jane Worcester, of Eliot. 
i83 7 . 
February 1st. Hiram Field, Eliot, and 

Sally Langley, of Somersworth. 
"February 19. James Jenkins, of Eliot, and 

Melvina D. Dolloff, Somersworth, N. H. 
February 26. Alexander Jenkins, of Berwick, and 

Elisabeth L,. Staples, of Eliot. 
March 12. Martin P.* Paul and Olive S. Dixon, Eliot. 
April 23. Oliver Grant, Berwick, Constant Chick, Eliot. 
April 30. John Field, Portsmouth, Sarah Frye, Eliot. 
May 14. Jacob Willey, Kittery, Eliza Ann Brooks, Eliot. 
July 23. Wm. D. Spinney, Eliot, Mary C. Linscot, York 
August 6. Simon Staples, 3d, and Loiza Field, Eliot. 
August 20. Isaac Frost and Judith Odiorne, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 7T 

1837. PublisJwients continued. 
September 9. Daniel Bartlett, jr. and 

Placentia Odiorne, Eliot. 
J September 24. Francis Frost, and Sally H. Raitt, Eliot. 
September 24. Wm. Hanscom, 4th. of Eliot, and 

Hannah M. Truman, of York. 
September 24. Jeremiah Butling, Charleston, Maine. 

and Anne Foster, of Eliot. 
October 22. Alexander Libbey and Deborah Chick. Eliot 
October 29. James Remick. and Abigail Wilkinson, Eliot 
Oct. 29. Charles Cole and Mary Elisabeth Witham, Eliot 
Nov'r5. Alexander R. Tobey, Clarissa Paul, Eliot. 
Nov'r 12. Caleb E. Chick and Nancy H. Spinney, Eliot. 
December 10. Samuel Grover and Mary Ann Jolley, Eliot. 
Dec. 24. Albert Paul, Eliot, Sally R. Shapleigh, Kittery. 
Dec. 31. Alexander Smith and Sarah Keating, Eliot. 

1838. 
January 7. William J. Paul, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth A. Pickering, of Portsmouth. 
Jan. 21. Paul Garvin, Somersworth, and 

Sarah Ann Hanscom, Eliot. 
February n. Nathan McKenney, Portsmouth, 

Caroline Spinney, Eliot. 
April 15. Levi J. Shapleigh and Mary Goodwin, Eliot. 
May 6. Dennis Ferguson, South Berwick, and 

Mary A. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
May 19. Oliver Lord, Eliot, Mary D. Wiggin, Dover. 
June 3. Hammond Libbey and Ann Maria Fogg, Eliot. 
July 29. Nathan L. Goodwin and Betsey Ferguson. 
Sept. 9. Elisha Hammond, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth Ann Fernald, of Kittery. 
October 21. John Nelson, and Lucy Ann Cole, Eliot. 
November 4. Thomas Cottle and Mary E. Dixon, Eliot. 
November 10. David Williams and Louisa Grover, Eliot. 
November 24. Geo. H. Nelson and Irena Welch, Eliot. 
December 9. Abraham Brooks, Mary G. Brooks, Eliot. 



-^-■■- 



72 MARRIAGKS. 

1839 Publishments continued. 
January 13. Moses Paul, jr. and Sarah J. Retnick, Eliot. 
February 3. Anthony Martin, jr ( Dnrham, N. H. 

Sarah Jane Johnson, Eliot. 
June 2. John Matthews, of Hallowell, and 

Mrs. Ann W. Spinney, Eliot. 
June 16. David Spinney, jr. and Abigail Foster, Eliot. 
June 23. Ivory Shapleigh and Louisa Staples, Eliot. 
June 23. John C. Staples, Eliot, and 

Alice Parsonage, Portsmouth, N. H. 
July 1. Washington Pickering, Portsmouth, and 

Mary Paul, Eliot. 
July 28. John Jones, Somersworth, N. H. 

and Mary Worster, Eliot. 
August n. Caleb S. Frost aud Sarah A. Bracey, Eliot. 
August 25. Leonard Spinney, Boston, and 

Martha E. Hill, Eliot. 
August 25. Timothy D. Vincent, Delevan, Illinois, 

Elisabeth S. Emery, Eliot. 
Sept'r 1 Dr. Horace D. Vincent and 

Sarah Jane Paul, Eliot. 
September 8. Alpheus H. Brooks, of Eliot, 

and Clarissa A. D. Quint, Newington, N. H. 
Sept. 8. Washington Leavitt, York, and 

Susan Hanscom, Eliot. 
1840 
January 19. Wm. D. M. Rogers, Mary Hammond, Eliot. 
April 26. Payson G. Dyer, Boston, Sophia Leighton, Eliot 
May 10. William Remick and Elisabeth Brooks, Eliot. 
June 3. Alexander Wilson, of York, and 

Mary A. Jenkins, Eliot. 
June 7. Jeremiah L. Spinney and Caroline Staples, Eliot 
June 24. Eliot Emery and Temperance Emery, Eliot. 
July 5. Francis Spinney, jr. Elisabeth Freeman, Eliot. 
Aug. 9. Thos. C. Stacey and Sarah Hubbard, Eliot. 
Aug. 9. John Stacey of Eliot, and 

Maiy H. Gardner, of Berwick. 



MARRIAGES. 73 

1840, Publishments \ continued. 
August 16. Asa A. Hill, of Eliot, and 

Olive B. Freeman, of York. 
August 20. Isaac Libbey, Eliot, and 

Mary Neal, South Berwick. 
September 20. Edwin Paul, Eliot, and 

Patience Smith, York. 
September 27. George A. Hammond, Eliot, 

Betsey W. Huntress, Centreville, Mass. 
October 22. Joseph Crosby, Portsmouth, and 

Nancy Fry, Eliot. 
November T5. Mark F. Lewis, Kittery, and 

Nancy Staples, Eliot. 
December 13. John Odiorne, Eliot, and 

Emily Adams, Portsmouth. 
December 20. William Simpson, Susan Johnson, Eliot. 
December 27. Benjamin Simpson, Eliot, and 

Lucy Crodofor, of Wells. 

The marriage of Joseph Crosby, of Portsmouth, and 
Nancy Fry, of Eliot, was solemnized, Nov. 30, 1840, by 
Rev. Ivory Kimball. 

Marriages. I84I. 

Married by Reverend Ivory Kimball : 
August 8, 1841. Moses Goodwin, jr. and 

Margaret Kennard. 
November 10. Horatio Bird, Springfield, Mass. and 

Caroline D. Nason, Eliot. 
Nov'r 14. Edward Spinney and Jane Whitham, Eliot. 
. Nov'r 25. Ichabod Cole and Mary K. Tetherly, Eliot. 
Dec'r 23. Lyman Staples and Mary Jane Brooks, Eliot. 
1842. 

By Rev. John Rice : 
April 7. Daniel Lord and Mary M. Siuclair, Eliot. 
April 7. Chandler Brooks, Eliot, and 

Sarah B. Kingsbury, York. 
May 1. Wm. H. Swett, Mary P. P. Carpenter, Portland. 



74 MARRIAGES. 

1 842. Co7itinued. 

By Rev. Ivory Kimball. 
April 17. Oliver T. Leighton, Eliza Jane Brooks, Eliot. 
April 24. Moses Libbey and Mrs. Leach, Eliot. 
Oct'r 17. Benj. Cram, Boston, Elisabeth Leighton, Eliot. 

By Rev. Josiah B. Clark : 
Oct'r 30. Samuel Cole and Sarah Ann Tetherly, Eliot. 

By Rev. John Rice : 
Dec'r 18. Benjamin Tetherly, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth Davis, Portsmouth. 
By Rev. Jesse Herriman : 
Oct. 23. Cyrus Fernald and Olive Mason, both of Kittery. 
Oct. 26. John Russell and Mary Kennison, Eliot. , 
Nov'r 6. James Goodwin, jr. and Abigail T. Paul, Eliot. 
Nov. 17. Wm. Lord, Boston, Lucy Ann Ferguson, Eliot. 
Nov. 30. John Smith, of York, and Jane Paul, of Eliot. 

By James Goodwin, Justice of the Peace, — 
Oct. 18. Charles M. Norton, formerly of York, and 
Nancy S. Stacey, of Kiiot. 
1843 

By John Rice, Ordained Minister of the Gospel : 
June 20. Thomas Brooks and Lucretia Staples, Eliot. 
June 29. William Tetherly and Ann E. Brooks, Eliot. 

By Francis Massure : 
No^'r 2. Gilman Raitt and Mary Nason, Eliot. 
Nov'r 7. Sylvester Mclntire, Esq., and 

Rhoda Mclntire, both of York. 
By Rev. Josiah B. Clark : 
April 11. Amos Seargeant, of Dover, and 

Julia Hanscom, Eliot. 
Dec. 7. Francis Weymouth, North Berwick, and 

Mary E. Scammon, of Eliot. 
Dec. 28. Daniel T. Dixon and Lydia N. Tetherly, Eliot. 

April 5. William Tucker and Ursula Chick, Eliot. 
Nov'r 12. Joseph Gould and Mrs Abigail Remick, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 75 

i844. 

March 30. by Rev. Francis Massure, 

George Mclntire and Clarissa Nichols, of York. 
April 17. by Rev. John C. Perry, 

William Varney, of Eliot, and 

Mrs. Lucy Colebath, of Portsmouth. 
June 16; Obadiah Jenkins and Lydia Knight, Eliot. 

The following marriages were not recorded till many 
years after the wedding days, — January 1851: 

This may certify that the following Persons were Joined 
in marriage before me, the Subscriber, one of the Justices 
of the Peace, within and for the County of York, viz : 

October 22d, 1820. Jeremiah Staples and Mary Brooks. 
August 12, 1824. John Gerrish, Berwick, and 

Mary Remick, of Eliot. 
February 24, 1825. At Kittery, Charles Goodwin and 

Abigail Smith, of Eliot. 
Mark Dennett, Justice Peace'. 
The foregoing is a true Copy of a return made this 
eleventh day of January, 1851. Attest, 

James G. Jenkins, Town Clerk. 



The three Town Clerks, whose ready and faithful pens 
recorded the Intentions of Marriage, and the dates of 
the Marriages, were, first, William Fogg, who did more 
"to investigate and record Eliot and Kittery history than 
any other man; next was William J. Paul, whose name 
sometimes has the prefix — Rev ; and the third Clerk of 
the Town was William Hammond. 



76 RECORDS. 

Persons Ages Recorded. 

Sarah Fernald, daughter of William Fernald and Mary 
his wife, born April 25, 1774. 

Sarah Ann Green, daughter of Nehemiah Green and 
Sarah his wife, born November 4, 1807. 

Nehemiah Green, son of Nehemiah Green and Sarah 
his wife, born March 29, 1809. 

Sarah Hammond, daughter of Joseph Hammond and 
Mary his wife, born December 29, 1792. 

Charles Green, son of Nehemiah Green and Sarah his 
wife, born September 9, 181 1. 

Stephen Neal and Ruthy his wife, were married the 
19th of the 3d Month, A. D. 1790. Their Children Born 
as follows : 

David G. Neal, Born 14th of ye 5th Mo. 1791. 
Stephen Neal, jr. Born 10th of ye 9th Mo. 1792. 
, Peace Neal, Born 23d of ye 8th Mo. 1794. 

Lydia Neal, Born 17th of ye 8th Mo. 1798. 

Lucy G. Neal, Born 9th of ye 9th Mo. 1800. 
Peace Neal Died, 3d of ye :o Mo. 1807. 

Nathaniel Bartlett, son of Nathan Bartlett and Abigail 
his Wife, born 23d Jan'y, 1798. 

Charles Elmore Bartlett, son of Nathan and Abigail 
Bartlett. born 27 December, 1803. 

William Morrel, son of Jacob Morrel and Sally his Wife 
born 25th October, 1811. 

Cyras Rogers, son of John Rogers and Dorothy his 
Wife, born nth March, 1794. 

Asa Libbey, son of George Libbey and Mary his Wife, 
born January 22d, 1813. 

— Gleaned from family and town records, years ago. 



MARRIA/GBS. 77 

Intention of Marriage. 

Continued from Marriages and Publishments, pages 57-75. 

1844. 

April 21. Oliver Paine and Polly Warren, Eliot v 
May 19. Alexander Raitt and Sarah A. Hill, Eliot. 
August 4. William Frye, jr. Hannah C. Dearing, Eliot. 
[August 11. Thomas Chick, Eliot, and 

Mary A. Hersum, North Berwick. 
September 17. Caleb Emery and Abigail Cutts, Eliot. 
(September 22. Charles H. Brown, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Martha J. Dixon, Eliot. 
November 17. *Moses G. Farmer, Dover, N. H. 

Hannah T. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
.December 1. George U. Emery, Sally Knowlton, Eliot. 
.December 22. Robert Hendry, Roxbury, Mass. and 

Elisabeth Hanscom, Eliot. 
1845. 
February 2. Leonard Waterhouse, Scarborough, , 

and Lydia A. Stacy, Eliot. 
February 2 James Field, jr. and Clarisa Remick, Eliot. 
February 9. Edmund A. Dixon and Ann P. Paul, Eliot. 
February :6. John Lydston, Mrs. Mary Quimby, Eliot. 
March 9. John Lundy and Mrs. Betsey Brooks, Eliot. 
May 4. Nathaniel S. Bartlett and 

Mrs. Catherine Chick, Eliot. 
May 9. James Devall, Kittery, Adaline Pierce, Eliot. 
May 12. James G. Jenkins, Eliot, and 

Mary Noble, Portsmouth, N. H. 
August 22. Capt. William Bartlett, Eliot, and 

Mary H. Cate, Northwood, N. H. 
August 31. Enoch Lewis, Kittery, Olivia Spinney, Eliot. 
August 31. Moses Goodwin, jr. Sarah Jane Grover, Eliot. 
September 14. Samuel P. Treadwell, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Hannah Nason, Eliot. 
September 21. Warrington Paul, Eliot, and 

Sarah A. E. Fernald, Kittery. 

See pages 49-56, — sketch of Prof. Mo?es Gerrish Farmer. 



! 



78 MARRIAGES. 

1845, continued. Inte?ition of Marriage ^ 
September 28. Nathan Paul, Susan A. Hanscom, Eliot. 
September 28. Mark Knight, Eliot, and 

Ann M. Junkins, York. 
October 5. Simon Foster and Olive A. Leach, Eliot. „ 
October 19. John H. Staples and Harriet Dixon, Eliot. 
October 26. James Tobey, Eliot, and 

Mary E. Tucker, Portsmouth, N. H. 
November 1. Daniel Bartlett, Mary A. Goodwin, Eliot. 
November 1. Oliver Staples, and Susan Staples, Eliot. 
November 9. Mark F. Goodwin, South Berwick, 

and Dorcas B. Frost, Eliot. 
November 15. James Hanscom and 

Olive A. Hanscom, Eliot. 
December 15. Freeman Hodgdon, Newington, N. H. 

and May Nason, Eliot. 
December 28. John P. Hanscom, Eliot, and 

Almira Welch, Kittery. 
1846. 
February 8. Richard A. Butler, Portsmouth, and 

Mrs. Mary E. Cole, Eliot. 
February 15. Washington Remick, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Sarah Dorr, North Berwick. 
March 15. Timothy Ferguson, Lucy M. Leightou, Eliot. 
June 12. Josiali Hooper, Margaret P. Brooks, Eliot. 
June 21. Isaac Spinney, New York, and 

Martha A. Green, Eliot. 
June 30. William Lewis, Kittery, and 

Jane Spinney, Eliot. 
July 3. Robert Spinney and Martha J. Cole, Eliot. 
August 7. William Fogg and Mehitable P. Moody, Eiiot. 
September 13. John D. Fernald, Kittery, and 

Mary A. Paul, Eliot. 
November 1. Charles C. Goodwin, Portsmouth, and 

Mrs. Sarah D. Kimball, Eliot. 
December 2. Amos Cousins, Kennebunk, and 

Hannah W. Lord, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 



79 



December 5, 1846. 



Joseph Furbish, Eliot, and 



£arch 14. 
I 

starch 18. 
Ilarch 21. 

Ipril 10. 

Hay 8. 

May 29. 

i : 
1 

July 31. 



Caroline G. Baker, Great Falls, N. H. 
1847. Intention of Marriage. 
February 21, 1847. John H. Rogers and 

Adaline P. Hanscom, of Eliot. 
James Hendrick, Portsmouth, N. H. and 

Mary P. Foster, Kliot. 
William D. Spinney and Alzira Field, Eliot. 
John Lewis, Portsmouth, N. H. and 

Mrs. Martha M. Dixon, Eliot. 
Thomas Hammond, of Eliot, and 

Mrs. Elisabeth J. Keen, of Kittery. 
James T. Woodman, and Mehitable Nason, Eliot 
Nathaniel Hanscom, jr. and 

Mrs. Lavinia Chandler, Eliot. 
Joseph D. Frost, Sarah M. Jellison, Eliot. 
August 21. Moses Libbey, Martha A. Goodsoe, Eliot. 
September 22. William Raitt and Loisa Frost, of Eliot. 
Dctober 2. Samuel Remick, of Eliot, and 

Susan A. Burleigh, Tuftenborough, N. H. 
William Huntress, Newington, N. H. and 

Izetta Spinney, Eliot. 
John Weeks, jr. of Kittery, and 

Christinia F. Rennick, Eliot. 
George Thornton, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Susan A. Brown, Eliot. 
George W. Fernald and 

Elisabeth W. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
Hugh Reniston and 
Elisabeth F. Hanscom, Eliot. 
Joseph Hinnim, Northfield, Mass. 

Lidia M. Hanscom, Eliot. 

Joseph Spinney, jr. and 

Elisabeth P. Dixon, Eliot. 
Samuel L. Paul, Eliot, and 

Maria Fernald, Kittery. 



October 9. 

October 27. 

i 

November 5. 

November 6. 

November 20. 

,Decetnber 4. 

1848. 
February 18. 

February 22. 



80 MARRIAGES. 

1848, continued. Intention of Marriage, 

March 25. Lyman Parsons, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth King, Philadelphia. 
April 15. Charles H. Breed, Lynn, Mass. 

and Matilda B. Allen, Eliot. 
April 15. Daniel G. Hanscom and 

Sarah J. Spinney, Eliot. 
May 5. William W. Tobey, Eliot, and 

Lydia A. Reinear, Portsmouth, N. H. 
August 19. Elisha W. Frost, Mrs. Sarah W. Hill, Eliot. 
Sept. 15. David Emery and Mary A. Hamilton, Eliot. 
Sept. 23. Henry M. Jenkins, Eliot, and 

Adriana Wentworth, Portsmouth. 
October 7. James Field, jr. Eliot, and 

PameliaS Hillard, Kittery. 
October 21. William Simpson, Eliot, and 

Sarah A. Shapleigh, South Berwick. 
November 4. William Hill and Miriam Leighton, Eliot. 
November 4. Samuel N. Warren, South Berwick, and 

Mary A. Remick, Eliot. 
November 15. William Stacy and Mary A. Furbish, Eliot 
November 25. Oliver Dixon, Eliot, and 

Francis Lord, South Berwick. 
December 2. Charles W. Walker, Portsmouth, 

and Martha J. Tobey, Eliot. 
December 9. Sylvester M. Brooks and 

Olive J. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
December 12. John Lundy and Charlotte Remick, Eliot. 

1849. 
January 27. Japhet Morrill, Elisabeth P. Hanscom, Eliot 
April 8. Augustus W. Brooks, Mary J. Shapleigh. Eliot. 
May 18. George M. Dixon, Marsha A. Spinney, Eliot. 
July 1. Dr. L. Murry Wi lis, and 

Paulina H. Fogg, Eliot. 
July 8. John Neal and Elisabeth Raitt, Eliot. 
September 2. Timothy O. Parker, Saugus, Mass. 
and Irene D. Witham, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 8l 

1849, continued. Intention of Marriage. 
September 30. Sylvester Ferguson, Eliot, and 

Orivill L- Larrjbee, Limington. 
October 7. Pierpont Hanscom, Eliot, and 

Eliza J. Philbrook, Kittery Navy Yard. 
October 14. Abraham Brooks, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Elvira J. Lord, Dover, N. H. 
October 21. Nathaniel Spinney, and 

Caroline Leach, Eliot. 
October 28. Jefferson Raitt and Isabelle Knowlton, Eliot. 
October 28. Augustus Hanscom and Sally Mclntire, Eliot 
November 11. Charles H. Lang, Dover, N. H. 

Sarah A. Staples, Eliot. 
December 30. Benjamin Brooks, Eliot, 

and Julia A. Lewis, Kittery. 
1850. 
January 20. Francis Raynes, Boston, and 

Harriet C. Hanscom, Eliot. 
Harch 17. Simon Hanscom and Olive Remick, Eliot. 
March 17. Stephen Hanscom, Eliza J. Hanscom, Eliot. 
\pril 28. Dr. Johnson Clark, New Bedford, Mass. . 

and Frances J. Hanscom, Eliot. 
May 19. Leonard C. Staples, Eliot; and 

Hannah M. Colby, Dover, N. H. 
August 11. Hamilton Spinney, and 

Betsey D. Tetherly, Eliot. 
September 10. Charles S. Mason, Hartford, Ct. and 
I Martha D. Fall, Eliot. 

)ctober 13. Sylvester Staples, Sarah S. Dixon, Eliot. 
)ctober 27. William Nason, jr. Eliot, and 

Lucy A. Cutting, Portsmouth, N. H. 
1851. 
ebruary 9. William G. Cole, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Hannah T. Brooks, Eliot, 
larch 9. Fabius Spinney, and Martha A. Leach, Eliot, 
larch :6. Joseph L. Grant, Meriden, N. H. 

and Mrs. Julia H. Sargent, Eliot. 



82 MARRIAGES. 

I85I, continued. Intention of Marriage. 
April 13. Richard H. Shapleigh, Rosan Tobey, Eliot. 
May 18. William Hanscom, 4th, and 

Mrs. Clarisa Tobey, Eliot. 
May 25. Jeremiah Knowlton and Eliza Goodwin, Eliot. 
June 30. Marshal W. Post, Madison, Ct. and 

Caroline A. Paul, Eliot. 
August 10. Charles W. Seavey, and 

Frances E. Manson, Eliot. 
August 17. Charles W. Dixon, Mary J. Staples, Eliot. 
October 29. Daniel Staples, Margaret E. Spinney, Eliot. 
November 2. Sylvester Hanscom, Elisabeth S. Paul, Eliot 
November 16. Samuel H. Spinney, and J 

Ann M. Kennison, Eliot. 
November 27. Frederick Pirseh, Boston, and 

Mary A. Spinney, Eliot. 
1852. 

January ir. Daniel Stacy, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth Whithouse, Somersworth, N. H. 
February 8. Charles W. Brooks, Eliot, and 

Johanna Wilson, Kittery. 
February 22. Justin Hanscom, Sarah M. Hanscom, Eliot 
March 21. Joseph' Graves, Kittery, and 

Mary A. H. Brooks, Eliot. 
March 28. George E. Stearnes, MLlbury, Mass., 

and Ann A. Clark, Eliot, 
May 9. Joseph Stacy and Mary A. Chick, Eliot. 
July 3. Nathaniel Shapleigh, 3d. Eliot, and 

Martha A. Maddox, Great Falls, N. H. 
August 15. Joseph Kennison, Sarah J. Spinney, Eliot. 
September 24. Nicholas P. Furber, Newington, N. H. 

and Caroline Welch, Eliot. 
September 27. Daniel Furbish and Eliza J. Raitt, Eliot. 
October 4. Dr. Charles P. Chandler, Addison, 

and Mary A. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
October 19. Hiram Field, Eliot, Mary Furbish, York. 



MARRIAGES. 83 

i852, coniinued. Intention of Marriage, 
November 8. Daniel A. Hill, Klioi, and 

Jane A. Thompson, York. 
November 22. Jairus Coleman, Dover, N. H. and 

Sarah J. Taylor, Kennebunk. 
November 25. Horace H. Vinton, Melrose, Mass. 

and Isabelle Raitt, Eliot. 
December 10. Stephen Green and Betsey Kennard, Eliot. 

] 1853. 

January 13. Harrison O. Flint, Salem, Mass. and 

Mary Augusta Leighton, Eliot. 
January 14. Edward H. Paul, Mary C. Spinney, Eliot. 
January 30. Nathan Spinney, jr. and 

Martha J. Spinney, Eliot. 
March 19. George W. Leach, and Maria Spinney, Eliot. 
March 20. George K. Gibbs, Lewiston, and 
Ann E. Fernald, Eliot. 
April 15. Sylvester Spinney, Eliot, and 

Mary A. Erch, Portsmouth. 
May 21. Stephen H. Tobey, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Almeda Norwood, York. 
June 1. John W. Bates, Great Falls, N. H. and 

Sophia K. Thompson, Embden, Me. 
June 11. Benjamin F. Bartlett and 

Cynthia E. Hanscom, Eliot. 
June 21. John Lundy and Elisabeth Spinney, Eliot. 
June 28. John Rogers, Eliot, and 

Emma Woodworth, Albany, N. Y. 
August 10. Temple W. Webber and 

Eliza J. Manson, Portsmouth. 
September 15. Charles F. Hanscom and 

Hannah K. Goodwin, Eliot. 
September 24. Dudley A. Garland, Somersworth, N. H^ 

and Roseanna Cole, Eliot. 



84 MARRIAGES. 

1854. Intention of Marriage. 
January 2. Jeremiah P. Goodwin, and 

Hannah M. Jones, Eliot. 
January n. James H. Gerry, and 

Abby M. Pettegrew, Eliot. 
January 25. Isaac Martin and Clarissa Mclntire, Eliot. 
February 4. Samuel B. Ham, Cambridge, Mass. 

and Paulina Cutts, Eliot. 
February 18. John W. Leighton, Boston, and 

Anxretta T. Frye, Eliot. 
February 21. Daniel P. Spinney, Ann M. Spinney, Eliot. 
February 24. Samuel Martin and Ellen Dunn, Eliot. 
March 12. James H. Knovvlton, Matilda P. Bartlett, Eliot 
April 12. James Tucker and Abigail Gould, Eliot. 
April 22. Moses Morrill and Sarah E. Emery, Eliot. 
May 9. James H. York, Portsmouth, and 

Lucy A. Emery, Eliot. 
May 18. Charles W. Foster, Eliot, and 

Minnie E. Trickey, Portsmouth. 
August 5. Augustus Fernald and Octavia G. Green, Eliot. 
August 19. Jonathan Leighton, and 

Mrs. Sarah A. Fernald, Eliot. 
August 19. Lorenzo D. Manson, Kittery, 

and Mary A. Martin, Eliot. 
October 2. James W. Brooks, Eliot, and 

Anna A. Wilson, Kittery. 
1855. 
January 9. Ira S. Paul and Margare 1 Leach, Eliot. 
March 14. Walter T. Brooks, Mrs. Mary E. Butler, Eliot. 
March 2r. William H. Mandal, Somersworth, N. H. 

and Elisabeth Kennard, Eliot: 
March 26. John S. Browto, Mrs. Ann M. Spinney, Eliot. 
March 29. Charles W. Rogers and Mary A. Paul, Eliot. 
April 29. James J. Johnston and Sarah E. Rogers, Eliot. 
May 12. Charles Anderson, Portsmouth, N. H. 
and Lydia A Cole, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 85 

1855, continued. Intention of Marriage. 
August 18. William Jackson, Eliot, and 

Anna T. Martin, Portsmouth. 
!Vugust 21. Dr. Clark C. Trafton, Kennebunk, 

and Julia E. Hammond, Eliot. 
August 25. A. H. Iy. Bedell, Sanford, and 

Olive J. Paul, Eliot. 
September 1. Samuel H. Spinney, Eliot, and 

Susan A. Pettigrew, Kittery. 
Dctober 22. Albert J. Knight and Adaline Dixon, Eliot. 
bctober26. John R. Hanscom, Elisabeth Hammond, Eliot 
November 1. Rufus Stewart, Wells, and 

Catharine J. Spinney, Eliot. 
November 2. Daniel Hammond, Eliot, and 

Susan A. Goodwin, South Berwick. 
November 16. William J. Paul, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Hersina F. Dole, South Acton, Mass. 
November 26. Joseph Knowlton, Portsmouth, and 

Lydia H. Remick, Eliot. 
November 28. Simon F. Spinney, Eliot, and 

Margaret A. Fernald, Portsmouth, N. H. 
December 26. Sylvester Bartlett and 

Clementine Raitt, Eliot. 
1856. 

January 14. Winslow O. Garland, Somersworth, N. H. 

and Mary A. Baker, Somersworth. 
January r . Ebenezer Plaisted and 

Mrs. Hannah Simpson, Eliot. 
February 27. George Briggs, Raymond, Maine, 

and Miss Hannah Simpson, Eliot. 
April 14.- James W. Tobey, Eliot, and 

Hannah Martin, Portland. 
July r. Nathaniel Tufts, jr. Maiden, Mass. and 

Susan E. Frost, Eliot. 
August 20. David L. Hodgden, Great Falls, N. H. 

and Mary H. Fernald, Eliot. 
August 29. Melville Hanscom, and Sarah Eibbey, Eliot. 



86 MARRIAGES. 

I8561 continued. Intention of Marriage. 
September 1. Samuel C. Shapleigh, and 

Sarah F. Hammond, Eliot. 
September 3. Henry M. Raitt and Sarah J Nason, Eliot. 
September 5. Aaron Hanson, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth B. Cook, York. 
September 17. Charles E. Stacy and Octavia Frost, Eliot. 
October 10. Charles B. Jones, Eliot, and 

Rosa J. Rowell, York. 
November. William D. Durgin, Tuftenborough, N. H. 
and Mary Ann Nutter, Eliot. 
i857. 
January 8. Frank L. Fernald, Portsmouth, and 

Mary E. Remick, Eliot. 
January 9. Joseph Spinney, Elisabeth K. Brooks, Eliot. 
Jhnuary 12. Henry P. Spinney, Eliot, and 

Olive A. Newbergin, Newfield, Maine. 
April 11. Archelaus T. Welch, Emily A. Spinney, Eliot. 
September 19. Capt. John Paul, Eliot, and 

Elisabeth Wilson, Kittery. 
September 26. James H. Spinney, Eliot, and 

Olive A. Aspinwall, Kittery. 
October 8. William Varney, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Delia H. Brown, Belfast, Maine. 
December 12. Oliver Prime, Boston, Mass. and 

Emma F. Kennard, Eliot. 
1858. 
January 9. Jefferson Raitt and Elvira S. Emery, Eliot. 
February 13. James W. Wherren, Eliot, and 

May S. Frisbee, Kittery. 
May 8. William O. Brooks, Eliot, and 

Mary J. Sinclair, Stratham, N. H. 
May 22. Andrew P. Fernald, Eliot, and 

Lucy J. Grant, York. 
May 21. James M. Shapleigh, and 

Aravesta Hammond, Eliot. 



MAHRIAG3S. 87 

i858, continued. Intention of Marriage. 
I July 10. Thomas J. Burt, Boston, and 

Mary A. Libbey, Eliot. 
September 15. Jerome S. Wherren, Eliot, and 

Sarah P. Lane, Wolfborough, N. H. 
I September 27. Levi W. Adams, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Elisabeth A. Staples, Eliot. 
October .12. John W. Knight, Nancy A. Spinney, Eliot. 
[ October 25. Joseph Remick, jr. Boston, Mass., 

and Mary A. Hammond, Eliot. 
November 1. Joseph Remick, Angeline Brooks, Eliot. 
November 20. Andrew J. Dixon, Mary J. Dixon, Eliot. 
December 1. Abram Hill, Boston, Mass. and 

Sarah C. Holmes, Eliot. 
December 11. Isaac Flint, North Reading, Mass., 
and Mary J. Cutts, Eliot. 
1859. 
January 17. John M. Remick and Lenora Spinney, Eliot. 
July 14. James W. Bartlett and Hannah Cook, Eliot. 
Augusts. Stephen A. Dixon and Ellen Hanscom, Eliot. 
August 13. Joseph L. Kennison and Miranda Citts, Eliot 
August 17. George A. Frost, Emily M. Darling, Eliot. 
September 6. Samuel S. Simpson, Eliot, and 

Clarisa J. Hasleton, Chester, N. H. 
October 10. Joseph S. Grant, York, and 

Evaline Simpson, Eliot. 
October 25. Alvah Darling, Eliot, and 

Georgians Weeks, Kittery. 
November 5. John D. Frost and Lucy Knowlton, Eliot. 
November 12. Solomon Staples and Jane Chick, Eliot. 
i860. 

January 14. Richard F. Djxon, Sarah A. Dixon, Eliot. 
February 20. Hiram W. Emery, Lockport, Maine, 

and Sarah F. Bartlett, Eliot. 
March 27. George M. Stevens, Andover, N. H. 

and Mrs. Lucy M. Ferguson, Eliot. 



88 MARRIAGES. 

1860. Intention of Marriage. 
May 21. George C. Bartlett, Eliot, and 

Phoebe Bartlett, New Portland. 
June 18. Charles W.,Tetherly, Eliot, and 

Mary M. Lydston. 
August 21. John W. Remick, Emily Hammond, Eliot. 
September 4. John H. Staples and Lucy M. Dixon, Eliot. 
September 28. Henry F. Donnell, Newburyport, Mass. 

and Sarah H. Leighton, Eliot. 
September 29. Capt. Alphonso H. Brooks, and 

Mrs. Martha A. Spinney, Eliot. 
October 8. John Varney and Mary A. Carter, Eliot. 
October 23. Samuel A. Staples, Eliot, and 

Martha A. Place, Kittery. 
October 31. Robert Drew, Portsmouth, and 

Drucilla Paul, Eliot 
November 29. Pierpont Hammond and 

Mary E- Shapleigh, Eliot. 
December 16. Oliver Paine and Mary E. Powers, Eliot. 
December 3£. James Griffin, Northwood, N. H. 

and Mary A. Bennett, Dover, N. H. 
M ly 6. Frank N. Dixon, Eliot, and 

Lydia S. Sanborn, Kittery. 
June 3. Charles W. Feraald, Kittery, 

and Mary A. Remick, Eliot. 
July 15. John W. Young, Portsmouth, and 

Rebecca Emery, Eliot. 
August 5. Paschal M. Langton, Kittery, 

and Sarah A. Tobey, Eliot. 
August 31. Daniel Goodwin, jr. and Mary A. Lord, Eliot. 
Septeinbtr 16. Jefferson Raitt, Sarah H. Ferguson, Eliot. 
November 8. James A. Jones, Eliot, and 

.Augusta C. Carter, Kittery. 
November 21. Laban A. Grover, Eliot, and 

Mary A. Carter, York. 
December 2. Ira Hanscom, Martha A. Tetherly, Eliot. 
December 10. Thomas A. Staple, Eliot, and 

Fannie M. Towle, Newington, N. H. 



MARRIAGES. 89 

1862. Intention of Marriage. 
February 1. Alexander Dixon, Ellen E. Staples, Eliot. 
February 9. Augustus Paul, Amanda Leach, Eliot. 
February 17. Theodore Fernald, Almira E. Spinney, Eliot 
February 24. Louis J. Farwell, Great Falls, N. H. 

and Lavina Brooks, Eliot. 
March 24. Washington Brooks, Eliot, and 

Phoebe Graves, Kittery. 
April 10. Joseph W. Libbey, Lucy A. Pettegrew, Eliot. 
June 24. William Shapleigh, Eliot, and 

AdalineM. Foye, Portsmouth, N. H. 
September 5. Henry M. Paul, Mary E. Tetherly, Eliot. 
October 4. Capt. Joshua Frost, Mary Cushman, Eliot. 
October 25. Samuel A. Remick, Eliot, and 

Fannie D. Brown, Belfast. 
October 27. John F. Raitt, Eliot, and 

Susan A. Lord, South Berwick. 
Nov'r :6. Joshua L. Frye and Mary E. Brooks, Eliot. 
Nov'r 25. Stephen Ferguson, Eliot, and 
Almira J. Seavey, York. 
1863. 
January 3. Sam'l Clark and Ellen J. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
January 10. William A. Staples, Julia A. Lewis, Eliot. 
January 26. Frank Shores, Portsmouth, N. H. and 

Fidelia S. Murphy, Eliot. 
January 27. Eliott Emery, York, and 

Lucy E. Simpson, Eliot,, 
April 14. George W. Brown, Sarah T. Kn ght, Eliot. 
April 27. Albert A. Shapleigh, Susan A. Hanscom, Eliot 
May 8. George A. Tobey, Constantia O. Tetherly, Eliot. 
June 22. Edwin F. Tobey, Olive A. Staples, Eliot. 
July 8. John Shapleigh, Eliot, and 

Julia A. Fernald, Kittery. 
August 4. Albert W. Libbey, Ellen P. Holmes, Eliot. 
Aug. 19. Henry D. Spinney, Sarah E. Hammond, Eliot 
Sept. 15. Morris G. Shapleigh and Almira Leach, Eliot. 



90 MARRIAGES. 

1863, continued . Intention of Marriage. 
October"i7. Samuel Shapleigh, Eliot, and 

Susan A. Whitehouse, Dover, N. H. 
October 2S. Levi R. Staples and Lucy M. Frost, Eliot. 
Nov'r 20. James H. Decoff and Nancy Emery, Eliot. 
Nov'r 30. Samuel Shapleigh, jr. and 

Sarah E. Grace, Eliot. 
December 1. Roscoe G. Shapleigh and 

Annette C. Dixon, Kliot. 
December 10. George E. Bartlett, Eliot, and 

Ellen D. Whitney, Casco. 
December 16. James M. Raitt and 

Mrs Nancy Y. Cutler, Eliot. 
December 19. Eenj. F. Downing, Lizzie D. Bartlett, Eliot 
December 22. Ai S. Cole, Eliot, and 

Caroline A... Varney, Portsmouth, N.H. 
i864. 
January 2. William O. Jones and Emily E. Clark, Eliot. 
April 9. _Charles H. Spinney, Eliot, and 

Sarah J. Nowell, York. 
April 9. James A. D. Remick, Olive E. Spinney, Eliot. 
May 18. Charles E. Paul, jr., Eliot, and 

Rosamond F. Coleman, Nevvington, N. H. 
May 20. Francis Spinney, Eliot, Mary E. Place, Kittery. 
May 20. Joseph W. Davis and Betsey Dixon, Eliot. 
May 27. Nehemiah Loagee and Lizzie Sanborn, Eliot. 
June 23. Jeremiah P. Goodwin, Eliot, and 

Isabella D. Wilson, Kittery. 
July 28. John L. Ltttlefield and Ann A. Frye, Eliot. 
August 18. Myrick L. Hatch, Dorchester, Mass. and 

Sarah E. Knowlton, Eliot! 
September 29. Charles W Stimpson, Kittery, and 
Mrs. Martha J. Walker, Eliot. 
November 5. Albert Goodwin, Mary E. Shapleigh, Eliot 
Nov'r 7. Henry C. Hammond and Carrie B. Jones, Eliot. 
Dec'r 10. Elijah Varney and Frances C. Brooks, Eliot. 
Dec'r 25. Lyman P. Spinney, Kliot, and 

Elisabeth F. Stackpole, Charlestown, Ms. 



MARRIAGES. 91 

i865. Intention of Marriage. 
February 20. Jeremiah Libbey, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Hannah Scott, South Berwick. 
April 8. Thaddeus W. Knight, Sarah J. Welch, Eliot. 
May 7. Alfred L,. Brooks and Annie A. Lewis, Eliot. 
May 19. William H. Brooks, Eliot, and 

Mary J. Bickford, Epsom, N. H. 
May 26. Amos Cousins and 

Mrs. Elisabeth S. Hanscom, Eliot. 
May 28. Henry C. Tobey and Nellie A. Goodwin, Eliot. 
June 20. Stephen A. Dixon and 

Mrs. Anoie L. Roberts, Eliot. 
August 21. Nath'l Frost and Olive J. Emery, Eliot. 
Nov'r 25. Augustus Brooks and Mary E. Staples, Eliot. 
Nov'r 27. Joseph R. Manning, Aphia A. Nelson, Eliot. 
December 1.8. Harrison T. Frost, Eliot, and , 

Addie F. Frost, Boston, Mass. 
1866. 
January 22. Oliver C. Stacy and Lydia A. Emery, Eliot. 
H.~E. Bartlett, Eliot, and 

Mrs. Maria Jackson, Casco. 
April 28. Charles E. Paul, Mrs. Adeline F. Welch, Eliot 
May 9. John R. Cole and Mary E. Cottle, Eliot. 
Sept. 1. Oren B. Hammond, Cambridge, Mass. and 

Mary E. Bartlett, Eliot. 
Oct. 1. T. Frank Staples and Clara E. Spinney, Eliot 
Oct. 15. Alvin Dixon and Mary A. Libbey, Eliot. 
Nov'r 17. John E. Fernald and Eliza J. Adlington, Eliot. 
Nov'r 23. George W. Libbey, Eliot, and 

Fannie A. C. Tarlton, Newcastle, N. H. 
Dec'r 10. Geo. O. Shapleigh, Lizzie M. Kennar-d, Eliot 

1867. 
May 6. J. Howard Paul, Arianna M. Guptill, Eliot. 
June 26. John H. Rogers, Mrs. Emily D. Bartlett, Eliot. 
Dec'r 17. Simon Emery, Eli°t, and 

Arazena H. Fernald, Kittery. 
Dec'r 17. Frederick A. Staples, and 

Sarah A. Paul, Eliot. 



92 MARRIAGES. 

1868. Intention of Marriage. 
April 8. Fred. W. Retnick, Fanny A. Tetherly, Eliot. 
April 27. Samuel T. Baker, Milford, and 

Catherine S. Shapleigh, Eliot. 
May 6. » Eliot F. Scammon and Sarah A. Frost, Eliot. 
May 6. John W. Rogers and Lizzie M. Tucker, Eliot. 
June 10. George E. Bartlett, Eliot, and 

' Sarah Davis, Naples. 
Jnly 12. John F. Todd and Mary A. Frye, Eliot. 
August 17. Capt. George A. Harn, Strafford, N. H. 

and Nellie J. Tucker, Eliot. 
Sept'r 28. Percival B. Doroning, Cambridge, 

and Matilda C. Raitt, Eliot. 
October 6. James H. Kimball, Cambridge, and 

Cynthia H. Nason, Eliot. , 

Nov'r 6. Leander Brooks and Annie J. Guptill, Eliot. 
186P. 

June 30. Alfred Coasterntinoble, Plasburge, N. Y. 

and Mathilde Duperine, Canada. 
Sept'r 6. Daniel Hammond, Eliot, and 

Nellie J. Farr, Brunswick. 
Sept'r 22. Henry N- Frost and Hannah G. Staples, Eliot 

Married by Geo. W. Brown, Sept. 26. 
Dec'r 1. William H. Tucker, Eliot, and 

Augusta Chick, Berwick. 
Marriages, recorded 1870-90: 
1870, 
Febuary 3. Albert S. Hurse, Portsmouth, N. H: 

and Carrie H. Cole, Eliot. 
Feb. 20. David P. Pendexter, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Emma Cottle, Eliot. 
December 19, by George Bachelor, Salem, Mass., 
George S. Stevens, Monmouth, and 
Hattie E. Leighton, Eliot. 
1871. 
November 26. Moses E. Goodwin, Eliot, and 
Mary L,. Paul, Kittery. 



MARRIAGES. 93 

i872. Marriages. 
December 30. -Frank J. Paul, York, and 

Altie J. Paul, Eliot. 
June 16. John N. Isham, Wilbraham, Mass. and 

Harriet N. Guptill, Eliot. 
June 10. Jacob S. Hanscom, South Berwick, and 
Sarah L,. Hodgden, So. Berwick. 
September 5. Wm. O. Junkins, M. D. Greenland, N. H. 

and Lizzie J. Hill, Eliot. 
September 29. Frederick B. Furbish, Cambridge, Ms. 
and Sarah L,. Grant, So. Berwick. 
i873. 
June 8. Samuel W. Staples, Josephine E. Remick, Eliot. 
June 15. Hermon Staples and Rebecca F. Spinney, Eliot. 
May 20. William W. Benton, Concord, N. H. 

and Juliette Kinin, Eliot. 
October 16. Oliver Wilson, Kittery, and 

Sarah J. Paul, Eliot. 
November 8. David Urch, Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Ida A. Rogers, Eliot. 
Nov'r 27. Albert A. Fernald, Myra H. Lydston, Eliot. 
Sept'r 7. William Nichols, Eliot, and 

Lois E. Renshaw, Great Falls, N. H. 
1874. 
January 11. Geo. W. Shapleigh, Izetta E. Stacey, Eliot. 
May 10. Dan'l W. Dixon and Arabella S. Roberts, Eliot. 
May 10. Jackson M. Hoyt, Newington, N. H. 

and Cynthia H. Kimball, Eliot. 
May 2. By Horace Graves, Dover, N. H., — 
Fred. H. Rowe, Eliot, and 

Ellen E. Turner, Dover, N. H, 
December 24. Samuel E. Cole, Eliot, and 

Ella A. Dickey, Orland, Maine. 
1875. 
December 22. Daniel Brooks, Somerville, Mass. and 

Emma I. Fernald, Kittery. 
July 3. Walter C. Rogers and Vienna Spinney, Eliot. 



94 MARRIAGES. 

1875 co?ili?iucd : — 
June 15. Henry Shapleigh, Salem, Mass. and 

Annie S. Tobey, Eliot. 
Sept. 29. Timothy Manson and Lois B. Nichols, Eliot. 
Dec'r 31. Jasper Shapleigh and Harriet M. Staples, Eliot. 
Sept'r 30. George W. Dixon, Eliot, and 

Eizzie M. Builard, Wayland, Mass. 
July 17. Alfred Spinney aDd Aurilla M. Cole, Eliot. 
October 3. Harris Staples and Rebecca Cole, Eliot. 
July 24. George A. Genthner, Parkman, Maine, 

and Eliza O. Spinney,. Eliot. ' 

1876. 
January 11. Joseph H. Dixon, Eliot, and 

Bertha M. Pirsch, Jersey City, N. J. 
August 27. Calvin H. Staples, Wilhelmina N. Spinney. 
Dec'r 24. Frank E. Kennard and Klla M. Athorne, Eliot. 

1877. 

May 13. Mark Knight and Mary A. Fields, Eliot. 
July 2. Charles W. Estes, Eliot, and 

Anna Thomas, Maiden, Mass. 
July 22. Richard J. Remick and Isabel F. Cole, Eliot. 
October 24. N. Miliard Sewall, York, and 
Emma E. F. Guptill, Eliot. 
December 25. By J. W. Smith, Portsmouth, N. H. 
David Varney, Eliot, and 
Dorothy Manson, Kittery. 
1878. 
October 23. George K. Gibbs, Martha T. Fernald, Eliot. 
Nov'r 26. Robert D. Fernald, Orinthia J. Spinney, Eliot. 
Dec'r 8. Andrew P. Brooks and Alice A. Welch, Eliot. 

1879. 
February 16. Denton E. Randall, Cambridge, Mass. 

and Antoinette B. Remick, Eliot. 
April 26. Frank A. Spinney and Arabella F. Cole, Eliot. 
June 8. John E. Rogers and Emeretta A. Spinney, Eliot. 
June 26. Joshua M. Vaughan, Portsmouth, and 

Susie R. Cole, Eliot. 
Dec'r 28. Edgar W. Remick, Annie L. M. Welch, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 95 

1880. 

February 21. Pharez E. Rogers, Abbie M. Knight, Eliot. 
Feb. 21. Frank F. Knight and Lizzie M. Spinney, Eliot. 
Feb. 22. Melville S. Spinney, Geneva A. Staples, Eliot. 
Feb. 28. Geo. A. Fernald and Grace G. Spinney, Eliot. 
April 24. Clarke C. Tetherly, Addie L. Spinney, Eliot. 
August 1. George C. Hammond, Eliot, and 

Augusta Spinney, Kittery. 
November 6. Daniel W. Furbish, Eliot, and 

Hattie Wiggin, Northwood, N. H. 
Dec. 29. Charles O. Hill Mattie A. Gunnison, Eliot. 

1881. 
Feb. 12. Albert Lord and Martha J. Simpson, Eliot. 
April 17. James A. D. Remick, Florence A. Welch, Eliot 
June 1. By Rev. J. B. Lapham, Eliot, — 
John W. Manges, Portland, and 
Mrs. Eliza B. Evans, Saco. 
Sept. 6. David W. Murron, of Shapleigh, and 

Laura E. Dixon, Eliot. 
Sept'r 25. Alpheus B. Brooks, Vianna R. Staples, Eliot. 
Nov. 24. Henry A. Series, Portsmouth, N. H. and 

Fanny Libbey, Eliot. 
Dec. 26. Albert R. Dixon and Eva C. Staples, Eliot. 

1882. 
January 15. Alvin W. Place, Kittery, and 

Carrie E. Johnson, Kittery. 
Feb. 22. Winfield E. Tripp, Lyman, Maine, and 

Lizzie May Dame, Eliot. 
March 16. Benjamin F. Frost, Eliot, and 

Lula D. Nelson, Amesbury, Mass. 
April 16. Frank G. Fernald, Edith M. Spinney, Eliot. 
May 1. Martin P. Tobey, Abbie E. Rogers, Eliot. 
June 3. Edward E. Hanscom, Marblehead, Mass. 

and Annie L. Junkins Simpson, Eliot. 
October 11. William Hodgdon Mary E. Frost, Eliot. 
October 15. Fred I. Dexter, South Berwick, and 
Maggie O. Raitt, Eliot. 



96 MARRIAGES. 

1882 continued: — 
October 29. Guy G. March, Lawrence, Mass. and 

Mabelle Go wen, Eliot. 
Nov'r 12. James A. Hanscom, Elvena J. Fernald, Eliot. 
Dec. 28. George W. Shapleigh, Isa. Adams, South Eliot. 

1883. 
January 25. Elbridge Brooks, Eliot, and 

Ida M. Fernald, Kittery. 
February 14. Jos. H. Butler, Gertie H. Goodwin, Eliot. 
July 5. Edward P. Adams, Castine, and 

Lizzie C. Emery, Eliot. 
July 8. Elmer E. Martin, Kittery, and 

Roxanna Patch, York. 
August 1. John E. Hanscom, Mary E. Huntress, Eliot. 
September 15. Hennan A. Shapleigh, Eliot, 

and Mary E. Brown, Dover, N. H. 
October 16. Wm. W. Cook, Shapleigh, and 

Fannie Nelson, Eliot. 
October 24. Howard B. Furbish, Eliot, and 

Mabel C. Grant, South Berwick. 
Nov'r 11. Linville S. Remick, Nettie C. Lydston, Eliot. 
Nov'r 6. Alvin Nelson, Eliot, Rose B. Neal v So. Berwick 
Nov'r 22. Wm. J. Brooks and Ellen F. Donnell, Kittery. 
Dec'r 6. William L. Hobb, Dover, N. H. 

and Lizzie R. Hill, Eliot. .' 
1884. 
January :. Frank P. Hodgdon, Esther A. Abbott, Eliot. 
May 1. Flavius J. Paul and Jennie S. Hibbard, Eliot. 
May 18. Thomas F. Staples, Isabelle A. Spinney, Eiioc. 
Sept'r 20. Nathaniel Knowlton, Eliot, and 

Addie W. Goodwin, South Berwick. 
1885. 
September 22. William Hill and 

Mary J. Brooks, Eliot. 
October 6. Albert J. King, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Mary L. Adlington, Eliot. 



MARRIAGES. 



97 



1886. 

July 4. Fred. L v Paul and Ella B Remick, Eliot. 
July 7. Howard E. Bartlett, Eliot, and 

Annie Jessup, Amesbury, Mass. 
July 17. Walter W. Rowe and Lizzie F. Earle, Eliot. 
August 1. James K. P. Rogers and 

Angie A. Dame, Eliot. • 

October 27. George A. Towne, Everett, Mass. 

and Cora Belle Brooks, Eliot. 
November 4. Albert W. Nowell, and 

Ivizzie M. Paul, Eliot. 
November 22. Frederick J. Frost, and 

Elma J. Goodwin, Eliot. 
December 14. Samuel H. Chauncey, Boston, and 

Alice R. Adams, Eliot. - 
December 23. George E. Ireland and 

Laura A. Junkins, Eliot. 
1887. 
August 27. 

1888. 
January 16. 



Willard H. Spinney, and 

Annie Belle Foster, Eliot. 



Frank E. Worster, Eliot, and 

Henrietta F. Shaw, East Boston. 
June 2. William W. Knight and Lula L. Cole, Eliot. 
July 11. Charles B. Gale, Lawrence, and 

Nellie M. Worster, Eliot. 
Fred L. Spinney and Emma Hanscom, Eliot, 
John H. Griffin, Dover, N. H. and 

Abbie G. Bartlett, Eliot. 
James W. Bartlett, Lydia F. Worster, Eliot. 
Elmer E. Langton, Kittery, and 
Carrie L. Bartlett, Eliot. 
November 24. Horace L. Manson, Kittery, and 
Emma J. Knight, Eliot. 



August 11. 
October 16. 

October 29. 
October 18. 



98 MARRIAGES. 

1889. 

March 23. Frederick P. Davoll, Lebanon, Conn. 

and Ada W. Spinney, Eliot. 
March 16. Geo. E. Staples and Carrie E. Tetherly, Eliot 
October 30. Harry C. Crosby, Dover, N. H. 

and Loretta M. Nason, Eliot. 
November 9. Wallace E. Dixon, Eliot, and 

Alberta N. Ham, Dorchester, Mass. 
1 Soo. 
February 6. Geo. E. Leach and Ada S. Varney, Eliot. 
May 20. True L. Norris, Portsmouth, N. H. and 

Lillian G. Hurst, Eliot. 
August 10. Mauriee*S. Leach, Mabel G. Staples, Eliot. 
December 1. Victorft*. Junkins, York, and 

.Mary L. Hammond, Eliot. " *. " 
1891. 
April 6. Willard E. Raitt and Mary G. Rogers, Eliot. 
August 15. Ernest E. Coles, Eliot, and ,. 

Florence E. Carter, Kittery. .. - 

September 14. George W. Urde, Chicago, 111. 
Florence Spinney, Eliot. 
-September 30. Wilmot E. Spinney, Eliot, and 

Valeria Buck, Chelsea, Mass. ;,...» 
October 18. FreH. E. Cummings, Boston, and •;.;. 

Bertha E. Rogers, Eliot. 
November 1. Everett Spinney, Annie McDonald, Eliot. j 



See next page : 



I 

MARRIAGES. 99 

®lje MarrtagB GLzumvxxQ 

a Centuary ago. 



We have given the Marriages and Intentions of Mar- 
riage, recorded 'in the Books of the Eliot Town Clerks 
from 1810 to 1890 ; and ; in the ancient collection of the 
Joshua Hubbard papers, dating 1770, — one hundred and 
forty years ago, — we find the written ceremonial pledge, 
used by the Clergyman, or the Justice, of that far-away 
date, at a Mariiage.lt reads : — 

— Let the Persons who have proposed Marriage come 
forward : 

Mr. A. B. and Mrs. C. D. it appears to me by this 
Certificate from the Clerk of the Town of Kittery, That 
your Intention of Marriage has been Published Agreeable 
to Law,— 

Therefore I shall proceed to Join you in Marriage : 

Mr. A. B. please to take Mrs. C. D. by the right hand : 
You, A. B. do take C. D. to be your wife ; to live with 
her, Love, Nourish and Cherish her, both in health and 
sickness, to be chaste to her and her Only, and to do all 
the duties required of a husband : — This you promise to 
do and perform, until Death or the Laws of the Land 
shall make a Separation. 

Mrs. C. D. please to Take Mr. A. B. by the right hand : 
You C. D. do take A. B. to be your husband : to live with 
him, Love, honor and Obey him, — Nourish & Cherish 
him, both in Sickness and health, to be Chaste to him 
and him Only, and do all the duties required of a Wife. 
This you promise to do and perform, until Death or the 
Laws of the Land shall make a Separation. 

And I do Therefore, by Virtue of the Laws of this 



IOO " MARRIAGES. 



Commonwealth, and the Authority given me, — do declare 
you to be husband and wife, agreeable to the Laws of 
GOD and man. 

Next thing Prayers. 



Oi<d Euot : page of pleasant things ; 
The gleanings of the Past ; 
A Yesterday revives, and brings 
The memories we can grasp. 

The long-ago becomes once more 

The life of our to-day ; 
The names and faces thus renewed, 

Most kindly with us stay. 

We truly glean from time to time 

A page of history rare ; 
With interest turn Old Eliot leaves 

Its treasury to share. 

— Communicated. 



Historical Press : 

Fogg House. 

Old Road, Eliot, Maine. 

1909. 



OLD ELIOT. 

Dr J. L. M. WILLIS, Editor. 
VOL. IX. ELIOT, MAINE. July-September, 1909. No. III. 

B)iIIts Jamtlg. 

The name Willis, is one of about twenty British names 
derived from Will, alias Wille.. Before a uniform spelling 
was adopted, it occurred in many ways : — Wills, Willes, 
Wyllys, Wyllis, Willys, Willis. 

Among the immigrants to New England, in the 17th 
century, twenty of the name of Willis appear. One of 
these was, — 

Deacon Joint Willis 1, a Puritan of distinction and res- 
pectabilty. We first learn of him at Duxbury, Mass. in 
1637 ; where he held several town offices. He was made 
one of the grantees of the town of Bridgewater, in 1650; 
and at that time owned considerable estate. From that 
town he was elected the first representative to the General 
Court, at Plymouth, in 1651, and continued in that body 
for twenty-five consecutive years. 

His wife was Hannah — — — . His second wife was 
Elizabeth (Hodgkins) Palmer. His will w r as proved in 
1693. He had eight children, the oldest being — 

John 2. Dea. who died, 1712. He married Experience 
Byram, daughter of Nicholas Byram, of Bridgewater. He 
had five children. His son, — • 

Nathaniel 3, born about 1700, in Taunton, Mass., mar- 
ried and had two children. His son, — 

Lemuel 4, born about 1740; died 1780 ; married Lydia 
Hodges, who w r as born in Taunton, Mass. 1741, died at 
Windham, Vermont, 1810. Their son, — 

Lemuel 5, born at Taunton, Mass. June 29, 1771, died 
May 12, 1849, in Westmoreland, N. H.; married Fanny 
Cobb, born February 24, 1780, in Hallowell, Maine ; died 



102. WII«US FAMILY. 

in Westmoreland, N. H. August 18, 1862 ; had eight 
children. 

Lemuel 6, Rev'd, born April 24, 1802, at Windham, Vt. 
He was a prominent Universalist clergyman, and occupied 
pulpits in Troy, N. Y., Salem, Lynn and Cambridgeport, 
Mass., Portsmouth, N. H. and other places; married 
Almanda R. Simmons, of Westmoreland, Nov. 11, 1824; 
(Thanksgiving;) born January 25, 1803, died September 
23, 1846 ; married 2d, Mrs. Abigail P. George, of Warner, 
N. H. daughter of John and Miriam (Pettingell) Bean, 
March 30, 1847. She was born Aug. 17, 1799, died Oct. 12, 
1880, at Warner, N. H. He died at Warner, N. H. July 
23, 1878. Had Lemuel Murray 7, Otis Winchester 7, 
Algernon 7, Mary Linn 7, Harlon Simmons 7. 

Lemuel Murray, 7, M. D. born at Lebanon, N> H. 
Oct. 7, 1825, died at Charlestown, Mass. Jan. 17, 1893; 
married Paulina Hammond Fogg, daughter of John and 
Mary (Staples) Fogg, July 15, 1849, born June 4, 1826, 
died March 23, 1859; married second, Abbie Augusta 
Neal, daughter of Ebenezer and Pricilia (Hitchings) 
Neal, Lynn, Mass. Feb. 25, 1864; born Jan. 1, 1841, died 
Nov. 2i. 1903. 

He was a Surgeon in the Civil War; after which he 
was one of the leading physicians of Charlestown, Mass. 

Had by first marriage, one child : — 

John Lemuel Murray Willis 8, M. D. born Feb. 1 1, 1856, 
at Chelsea, Mass., resides at Eliot, Maine, where he has 
practiced medicine since 1877; married Carrie . Estella 
Ham, daughter of Freeman C. and Ellen J. (Cooper) 
Ham, Oct. 1, 1879; born Feb. 13, 1S59. They have two 
children: Elizabeth Gail Willis 9, born at Eliot, Oct. 18, 
1884 ; married Albert Eliot Libbev, Sept. 22, 190S. He 
was son of Albert W. and Mary Ellen (Holmes) Libbey, 
born at Brooklyn, N. Y. March n, 18S4. Harlon Parker 
Willis 9, born at Eliot, April 30, 1891. 

Lemuel Murray Willis 7. had by his second marriage 
two children. 

Harold Neal Willis 8, born at East Boston, Mass. July 



WIX.US FAMILY. I03 

29. 1866, married, Jan. 1, 1896, Mary Beatrice Lynch, 
daughter of William A. and Julia (McDermott) Lynch, 
horn .at Dorchester, Mass. Sept. 22, 1872; had three 
daughters born in Arlington, Mass., viz.: 
Beatrice Olive 9, born Dec. 16, 1898 ; 
Anna Gertrude 9, born July 16, 1900 ; 
Mary Edith 9, born Dec. 15, 1902. 
Edith Gertrude 8, born at East Boston, Mass. July 4, 
1868, married at Dorchester, Mass. March 24, 1896, 
Franklyn Samuel Rideout, son of Franklyn D. and Abbie 
(Hardwick) Rideout, born July 27, 1872; died at Maiden, 
Mass. Dec. 25, 1898. Had Jessie 9, born at Chicago, 111. 
Dec. 30, 1896. 

Otis Winchester 7, born at Troy, N. Y.August 24, 
died at Calaveras Co. June 29, 1896; married 1st Ellen 
Cheever, at North Branch, Cal. She died 1866. They 
had no children. Married second, at Petersburg. Cala- 
vera Co. Cal. Jan 12, 1870, Clemencia Valdez de Centeno, 
daughter of Antonio and Carmen Valdez, of Hermosillo, 
Mexico, born Dec. 14, 1840; died June 28, 1898. They 
had five children : 

Mary Linn 8, born Sept. 9, 1871. 
Ruth Ellen 8. born December 26, 1873. 
Clara George 8, born September 28, 1875. 
William Grant 8, born April 13, 1877. 
Alis Lois 8, born November 4, 1879. 
Mary Linn 8, married first Antoni Cassovia, August 19, 
1889, who died February 4, 1892. They had >ne daughter 
Elenor Raymond 9, born June 4, 1890, Oakland, Cal. 

Married 2d. John Stevenson, Dec. 6, 1894. They had 

one son : Arthur Willis 9, born July 4, 1896, Oakland, Cal. 

Married 3d, Charles Henry Walker,, at Reno, Navada, 

Sept. 29, 1900. They have three children : 

Glenwood Murray, born at Valley Springs, Cal. Sept. 23, 

1902. Charles- Craig born at Valley Springs, Cal. Sept. 

13, 1904. Sidney Harold 9. b. at Valley Springs, Cal. 

July 28, 1906. 

Ruth Ellen 8, born Dec. 26, 1878, married in 1892, John 



104- WILUS FAMILY. 

Hoey. The> r had one daughter, Clara Lillian, born 1893. 

Married 2, Andrew Jordahl, 1901. Nochildren. 

Clara George 8, born Sept. 28, 1875, unmarried. Died 
1897 or 1898. 

William Grant 8, born April 13, 1877, married Annie 
Mastinez Dec. 18, 1899; had William Grant, jr. 9, b. 1900. 

Alis Lois 8, born Nov. 4, 1S79. Married Sept. 28, 1907, 
in Oakland, Cal. Frank Smith, born 1879. No children. 

Algernon 7, born in Lebanon, N. H. July 28, 1833. Mar- 
ried Susan Leonora Marston, at Deerfield, N. H. Sept. 7, 
1859, who died at Deerfield, N. H. May 17, 1900 : — 

Had Eben Marston 8, born at Claremont, N. H. May 11 
1871 ; married Lena Vera George, at Concord, N. H. 
October 2, 1895. They have Mary Elizabeth 9, born 
July 25, 1899. 

Mary Linn 7, born January 13, 1836, died August 20, 
1869. Married Oct. 23, 1861, Philip Colby Bean, son of 
William Henry and Mary Swett (Colby) Bean; born 
April 24, 18^6, died Ma-rch 25, 189S. Had, — 

Lemuel Willis, born Sept. 19, 1866, at Warner, N. H. 
Married Carrie Belle Frost, Oct. 23, 1901 ; daughter of 
William E. and' Alma (Wood) Frost, of Brookline, Mass. 
born Feb. 9, 1876, in Boston. 

Harlon Simmons, born at Cambridgeport, Mass. July 18 
1843, mariied Susan Adelia, born Sept. 17, 1846, daugh- 
ter of Joshua and Lavinia (Foster) Sawyer, at Warner, 
N. H. Sept. 17, 1870; had — 

Arthur Lincoln 8, born at Warner, N. H. June 25, 
1872; married Sarah Mabtrl Gould, daughter of Henry 
Chandler and Elvira Marvin (Way) Gould, at Hillsboro 
Bridge, N. H. Nov. 4, 1895. 

Edward Simmons 8, Dec. 22, 1881." 

Florence Cheenev 8, born Nov'r 21, 1883. 



For other branches of the Willis family, in America, see 
New England Genealogical Register, 1859. 



OLD ELIOT. 105. 

East Eliot M. E. Church. 

By Mrs. Mary A. Butler. 

Previous to 1826, there was but one church in Eliot, — 
the Congregationalist, which was situated near the centre 
of the town. At that time we find this among the old 
church records : 

The people desiring religious worship in East Eliot, 
called a meeting by a warrant from the Justice of the 
Peace, organized themselves, by choosing the necessary 
officers, into a society, to build a house of worship. They 
chose a building committee, who contracted with "James 
Raitt to build a meeting house for $1350,00 ; which was 
raised April 14, 1826, and, according to the custom of the 
times was named. At this ceremony the speaker, sitting 
astride the ridgepole, repeated the following lines : 

Here is a fine frame for public worship raised, 
In which the God of Nature is to be praised; 
Religion is our object, and if we keep it in view, 
Morality will be established, and religion, too; 
The Contractor has faithfully begun, 
And treated his men well as far as he has gone; 
And when the Father calls His children home, 
May this Contractor be one of them. 

After this came the breaking of a jug and two tumblers, 
by the speaker. 

In the summer of this year, a stranger came to Eliot, 
and requested the privilege of preaching the gospel. As 
no public house was available, he accepted the invitation 
of Capt. Elisha Goodwin, to preach in his house. 

This was the first sermon by a Methodist; and the 
preacher was the Rev. George Pickering. 

The second was preached by Rev. Shipley Wilson, in a 
wood house of Mr. Goodwin. His text was John xi, 5. 

The proprietors of the new church were probably influ- 
enced somewhat by these sermons; for we find in the 
records, soon after, this vote : 

r " Voted, that this Society be called the Methodist So- 
ciety ; and that a committee be appointed to request a 



106. EAST EUOT CHURCH. 

minister of that Society to preach a dedication sermon on 
twenty-third of August." 

The services of Rev. John N. Maffitt, an eloquent 
Methodist minister from New Hampshire, were secured for 
the occasion ; his text was Gen. xxviii, 17. 

The afternoon sermon was by Rev. Thomas Greenhalyh 
who came to this country, from England, a few months 
before. 

There are few now living who remember the interior of 
the Church as it was first finished. The contract thus 
describes the pulpit : 

" The pulpit is to be built decently plain, and to stand 
on two posts in front, with stairs leading to the same to 
go up on the backside, with a suitable door to the same." 

Above the room now used for a vestry, was a gallery, 
called the singers' seats. This gallery was reached by a 
flight of steps at each end of the hall that extended across 
the entire front of the house. 

After the dedication, we find this record : 

"Voted, that the committee be authorized to procure a 
Methodist preacher, to preach in said house for the future, 
and as soon as may be." 

Rev's Phineas Crandall, Giles Campbell and Oren Bent 
alternated as supplies, until Conference assembled in 1827. 

The first Class was formed March 17, 1827, by Phineas 
Crandall. There were six members : 

Capt. Moses Paul and his wife, Mrs. Mary Paul, 
Mary J. Bartlett, 
Miss Sarah J. Paul, 

Kben Bartlett and his wife, Mrs Alice Bartlett. 
The Leader of the Class was Capt. Moses Paul. Mrs. 
Alice Bartlett died March 20, 1890, aged ninety-two years. 

In the records we find this request for a preacher from 
the Maine Conference : 

" We wish to have a smart Preacher, of Piety and Edu- 
cation, without a family, as our means of support will be 
small the first year. If such a man can be obtained, we 
think he will build up a large Society in a few years." 



EAST ELIOT CHURCH. 



107. 



Conference responded by sending Rev. Charles Baker. 

The first Sabbath School Society adopted its Constitution 
m 1828. 

The Parsonage was built in 1834 ; and was first occupied 
by Rev. George D. Strout. The earlier preachers resided 
in the house now owned by John Shapleigh, near the 
Church. 

In 1854, the Church was repaired and remodeled ; and 
again in 1878. 

In 1890, it was thoroughly reconstructed. A vestry 
with dining room and kitchen above, occupy the place of 
the old hall and gallery ; the tower has been removed from 
the roof and another built at the side of the house. 

Another important event in this history, was the organ- 
ization of the Kpworth League, in 1890 The League is 
still an efficient aid in all departments of Church work. 

The following ministers have served the Church at 
East Eliot:— 



1827. Charles Baker. 
1828-9. Justin Spaulding. 
1830-1. Aaron Sanderson. 
1832. Caleb Mugford. 
1833-4. Daniel Crocket. 

1835. George Strout. 

1836. Gorham Greely. 

1837. James Harrington. 

1838. Horatio N. Macomber 
1839-40-41. John Rice. 
1842. Jesse Harriman. 
1843-4. Francis Massuere. 

1845. Silas M. Emerson. 

1846. John W. Atkins. 
1847-8. Alvra Hatch. 
1849-50. John W. True. 
1851-2. John Mitchell. 
1853-4. John Cobb. 
1855-6. Simeon W. Pierce. 
1857-8. Albert T. Barnard. 
1859-60. Dan'l Waterhouse 
1861-2. Alpheus Loveweli. 



1863. Sargent S. Gray. 
1864-5. A - R - Sylvester. 
1866-7. Ezekiel Robinson. 
1968. Marcus Wight. 
1869-70/ Oliver M. Cousens. 
1871-2. Gershom F. Cobb. 
1873-4. Hezekiah Chase. 
1875-6-7. Silas F. Strout. 
1878-9. George R. Wilkins. 
1880-1-. John B. Lapham. 
1882. John M. Woodbury. 
1883-4-5. James H. Trask. 
1886-7. Kinsman Atkinson. 
1888-9. John Gibson. 
1890-1-2. Gilbert I. Lowe. 
1893-4. Erntst A. Porter. 
1895-6 Eugene W Kennison 
1897-1900. Frank C. Potter. 
1901-3. T. C. Chapman. 
1904-8. John E. Clancey. 
1909. Wm. P. Eldredge. 



io8. OLD 3U0T. 

Marriages, 

Solemnized by a Methodist Clergyman. 
The following marriages were "solemnized by the Rev. 
Aarou Sanderson," who was the Methodist clergyman 
stationed at the East Eliot church, in 1830-31. They are 
copied from a little record book of the clergyman, now 
preserved as a relic of his busy life and clerical duties : 

1831. 
February 3. Samuel Bridges and 

% Olive Ann Jenkins, both of Kliot. 

May 9. Joseph Emery and 

Olive Odiorn, both of Eliot. 
August 11. Nathaniel Foster and 

Mary Fry, both of Eliot. 
Nov'r 30. Daniel Pierce, jr. of Kittery, and 

Mary J. Bartlett, of Eliot. 
Dec'r 15. Peltiah Moore and 

Katherine Frost, both of Eliot. 

1832. ' : 

Jan'y 11. Samuel Hmscom, Eliot, and 

Lydia Willey, of Kittery. 
Jan^y 22. Eliot Emery, and 

Hannah Foss, both of Eliot. 

i837. 
April 2. Alexander Junkins, of I-erwick, and 

Elisabeth L. Staples, of Eliot. 



We do consider that a man who insults a School Teacher, 
insults the whole Inhabitants of the Said District. 

An Eliot School Committee, Sixty Years ago. 



OLD ELIOT. IO9. 

South Eliot M. E. Church. 

Gleanings from a manuscript history by 
SAMUEL H. REEVE. 

Joseph Spinney, Levi Remick, Asa Brooks and Wash- 
ington Remick, were the earliest to be interested in this 
church ; and were Methodists long before it was organ- 
ized. Many others also, residents of South Eliot, attended 
the Methodist services at Spruce Creek. 

In 1838, a Bible Study began in South Eliot: Hannah 
Remick and Harriet Hanscom, visited the people from 
house to house, and invited families to the School House 
for Sabbath sessions; and the result was, — the erection of 
a new house, 

In 1843, Levi Remick, Asa Brooks, Washington Rem- 
ick, Joseph Spinney, with orhers, went to the woods, 
cut and hewed timber ; and in one year, — 1844, — the new 
house of worship was completed. It was built on the 
upper end of Eliot Neck, and the east side of the Bolt 
Hill Road. 

1 1 was dedicated as a Methodist Episcopal Church. The 
leading clergyman in this transaction, was Elisha Adams, 
of the New Hampshire Conference, stationed at Ports- 
mouth. South Eliot, however, was of the Maine Conf. • \ 

The first Class was formed in 1843, by the Rev. J. C. 
Perry. He was the Pastor at Kittery. 

In 1845, (some think in the Fall of 1844,) the Rev. 
Josiah Hooper, became the First Minister of the M. E. 
Church of South Eliot ; young, active and successful, at 
that early date ; and still alive and hale, — in his ninety- 
first year. He received his commission in that early day 
from David Copeland, (then Presiding Elder ;) and re- 
mained with the new church two years. At that time 
Asa Brooks was the Class Leader. 

The Second Minister, stationed by Conference, 1847, 
was the Rev. Abram R. Lunt. 

Then followed two years, in which there was no Pastor. 
The local church secured supplies as they were able. 



HO. , OLD ELIOT. 

Jn 1850, the Rev. Mr. Simpson was procured. 

In 185 1, the Rev. James Marston was the supply. A 
revival led to additions to the church, and increased its 
interests. 

In 1852, Rev. Stephen H. Tobey was sent by the Maine 
Conference. 

In 1853, a change came: a Wesleyan Methodist, the 
Rev. William C. Clark, supplied; and he induced many 
to form a Wesleyan Church :— 

And in the years 1853-4. the present church edifice was 
built ; it was dedicated in June. The first house was 
moved and became the Parsonage and Class Room. 

Mr. Clark remained three years, then left the pulpit 
vacant. The Maine Conference came at once to the rescue. 

In 1856. Rev. Mr. Whitaker was procured. 

In 1857, Rev. James P.errin was the supply ; he came 
from the New Hampshire Conference 

In 185S, the Maine Conference sent the Rev. F. A. Craft. 
Are-organization in the Church took place ; are-union 
with the Annual Conference. Granville A. Rernick was 
the first Class Leader under this movement. In 1859, 
.under Mr. Craft's ministry, a revival occured, and the 
entire community was interested. 

In the i86o's, a season of depression fell upon the as- 
semblies ; from 1863 to 1865, the Church was left to be 
supplied : — 

The Rev. Horace Sawyer was called ; he remained 
nearly two jeais. and was acceptable; 
• Re**. Mr. Carter came from the Biblical Institute at 
Concord ; he remained a year; 

Rev. S. Holmau, then residing at Portsmouth, fol- 
lowed for a few months. 

Rev. James O. Thompson was sent, in 1866,-from the 
Concord Institute. He came in June to reside. 

Rev. Alvah Cook was sent in 1867; remained three 
years; and another revival was the result of his efforts. 

In 1870, came Rev. E. H. McKenuey, and he was suc- 
cessful In 1871, he left for other fields. But the pulpit 
was supplied. • 



A List of the Ministers,— 
and the years of service, 
each year beginning in the Spring, — 
will be found on the following page: — 



OLD EMOT. III. 

Rev. Alvah Cook returned in 1874 ; he had three suc- 
cessful years. 

In 1877, Rev. Alpha Turner was sent by Conference. 
He was however, stationed at Kittery Second Church, — \ 

and the Rev. B. Freeman ministered at South Eliot. At 
this date, .the Sabbath School, through the efforts of Mrs. 
Freeman, became very successful. 

In 18&6, Rev. Kinsman Atkinson was stationed at Eliot. 
He supplied two years. 

From 1888 to 1901, Kittery First Church and South 
Eliot were united. The ministers resided in South Eliot 
except Rev. Mr. Mitchell. 

' In 1902, Kittery desired its own pastor ; therefore Rev. 
Mr. Gerry was stationed at South Eliot, — 1902-3. Since 
then the Eliot Church has been supplied by the Pastor of 
Kittery Second Church. 

A new parsonage was erected in 1893 ; and a vestibule 
was added to the entrance of the church ; horse sheds 
also were erected. 

Rev. Mr. Pratt not only advocated these improvements, 
but, with tools at his command, he exercised his mechan- 
ical as well as ministerial skill. And not only were these 
externals accomplished during his ministry, but a new 
Organ was placed within the edifice. 

^-Rev. E. W. Kennison, during his stay, advised the 
new furnace, instead of the unsightly sfoves. j 

The Rev. Elbridge Gerry did a most pleasant work, 

the edifice underwent a thorough renovation ; and the 
vestry, also, -was included in the improvements. 

When the attractive and convenient improvements were 
complete, the Conference re-dedicated the House. 

Rev. .B. C. Wentworth, afterward Presiding Elder, and 
District Supt. preached the dedicatory sermon. 



112. 



OI<D ELIOT. 



The List of the Ministers 

and the Years of Service, M. E. Church, South Eiiot. 
Each Year begins with Spring. 



E. H. McKenney, 1870-71. 

A. C. Trafton, 1872-73 

Alvah Cook, 1874-76 

Alpha Turner, t 1877 

Benj. Freeman, 1877-78 

R. H. Kimball, 1879-80 

H. B. Mitchell, 1881-82 

E. K. Colby, 1883-84 
H. F. A. Patterson, 1885 

Kinsman Atkinson 1886-87 

W. F. Marshall, 1888-89 

H. B. Mitchell, 1890-91 

David Pratt, 1892-96 

H. W. Kennlson, 1897-99 

Elbridge Gerry, 1900-03 

Sylvester Hooper, 1904-06 

Daniel Onstott, 1907-9 



* Approximately. 

t Exchanged to Kittery Second Church. 



Josiah Hooper 1845, 


1846. 


Abram R, Lunt, 


1847. 


Transient Supplies, 


1848-9. 


Mr. Simpson, 


1850? 


J. Marston, 


1851? 


S. H. Tobey, 


1852. 


W. C Clark, 


I853-55- 


Mr. Whittaker, 


1856. 


J Perrin, 


1857. 


F. A. Crafts, 


1858-9. 


Ashsel Moore. 


i860. 


Swantor Ranks, 


1861-2. 


Horace Sawyer, 18m 


'63-4. 


Mr Carter, *i yr. 


1864-5. 


S. Holman, *3 mo. 


1865. 


James O. Thompson 


, 1866. 


Alvah Cook, 


1867-69. 



1688. Thomas Hanscora, Sen'r, hath Credit on Mr. 
Robert Eliot's Book for 30 ps. Timb'r, fetch't by Mr. 
Nath'll Fryer, about Novemb'r, 1688. 

Contents, Twenty Eight Tunns of pine Timb'r. 

Test : Nicho. Heskins. 
Recorded According to ye Original, 
April 16, 1714. 

William Fogg. 
















J&#U* WfocUMt 



OLD EMOT. 113. 

James W. Bartlett. 

■'■'•■ 
James W. Bartlett, the second son ol Nathan and 

Mehitable (Kmery) Bartlett, was born July 1, 1828, in the 

old Bartlett homestead in Eliot. 

He went to school in the old school house in District 

Number One, where his aptness lor mathematics was 

developed and strengthened. Among his teachers were 

Thomas Clemens, Monroe Hunt, 

Sarah Mclntire, Joshua Frost, 

Amos Sargent, Albion Hammond. 

Mr. Odell and George Emery also taught the school 

about this time. 

After he was *twelve years old, James attended school 

in the winters only, finding occupation with his brothers 

on his father's farm, through the other seasons. 

For twenty years, James was actively engaged with his 

brother Sylvester, in a large retail beef business. They 

bought their cattle, had all their beef dressed for them, 

and sold from their carts in the near-by towns. * i 

Starting this business in 1855, they continuedit through 

the war ; and after retiring from it in the Seventies, James 

gave his attention to farming, raising, for many years, 

large crops of cucnmbers, which he pickled before whole- 

salt-ing. 

James inherited the Bartlett homestead, which has been 

in the family since 1713 ; andmarried Caroline A. Good- 

wi .1, daughter of Nathaniel and Abigail (Rait) Goodwin, 

of Biddelord, October 24, 1861 ; she died March 26, 1887,. 

leaving three children : 

Abigail Goodwin ; i 

John Heard ; 

Alfred, graduated at Dartmouth Col. 1894 ; 

conducts a publishing business, Boston. 
Abigail Goodwin married John H. Griffin, Oct. 16, 1888, 
and lives in Newmarket, N. H.; they have three children : 

Caroline, 

Bartlett, a student at Dartmouth College ; 

lone. 



ii4.. 



OLD ELIOT. 



■ .. 



James Bartlett married, second, Lydia F. daughter of 
Stephen and Lydia (Emery) Worster, Oct. 30, 1888. 

He enjoys farm-life, and has given great care to his 
Jands ; — his fields producing many tons of the cleanest 
timothy ; and his apple orchards large quantities of finest 
winter fruit. 

Although an active farmer, he finds enjoyment in travel 
and has visited most of the states of the union. 

He is a member and liberal supporter of the Methodist 
Church ; a strong believer in Prohibition, — and in other 
movements which he believes to be for the greatest good 
to the greatest number. 

Being by nature a financier, and a man of integrity, he 
renders valued service io the Salmon Falls Bank, for 
which he has been Auditor for several years. 

Straight forward and honest in his dealings, he has no 
patience with the tricks and trades of politicians ; but he is 
a constant reader of the doings of Congress, in which he is 
deeply interested. He holds his opinions strongly, and 
his ready memory of facts and figures furnish him material 
for discussion at all times. 

Fearless, noble and patriotic, he gazes hopefully and 
optimistically on the fufure of his country. Hospitable, 
generous and cheerful, he loves nothing more than to be 
surrounded by his family and friends. 

o 

March 24, 1717-18. Nicholas Shapeigh, son and heire 
Surviveing of my late father, John Shapleigh, sells to 
William Brooks, lands bounded by Moses Hanscom, 
et als, near to ye road that goes from Capt'n Leighton's 
to Sturgeon Creek. — 

1717. Sam'l Hanscom witnesses deed of sale of land, — 
Joseph Wilson, Kittery, to Paul Wentworth, of Dover. 

May 13. 1718. Samuel Hanscom witnesses deed of sale 
of land, — Thomas Knight to John Dennet, both of Kittery. 
— Will lam fogg. gleanings. 



OLD EMOT. 115. . 

BY M. S. 

The family tradition is, that three brothers, — William, 
Samuel and Benjamin, — came to this country from Kent's 
county, England, to escape the great plague in London, 
which was in 1665.* They landed at Kittery Point. 

Later, William married Mehitable Weymouth ; settled 
in what is now Eliot, north of Sturgeon Creek, by the 
river. The land where the house stood, is now owned by 
George Brown, who uses water out of the old well. 

The old burying ground is near by, as shown on an old 
map, owned by George E- Stacy. In 1779, there were' 
thirteen graves, besides their slaves who were buried on a 
knoll, a short distance away. One Samuel Stacy, an old 
man, was buried in 1770, according to the headstone, — 
probably William's son. William died in 1752. 
Second Generation : — 

Benjamin, son of William and Mehitable (Weymouth) 
Stacy, married, October 7, 1730, Lydia Libbey, of Ber- 
wick. He lived where his father had lived before him; 
had several children. 

Third Generation : — 

Ichabod, son of Benjamin and Lydia ( Libbey) Stacy, 
born 1731, married, 1736, Lydia Guptilf, of Berwick ; lived 
on the old homestead by the river. Ichabod was King's 
Surveyor. Died in 18 io. Their children were : — ; 
Fourth Generation : — 

William, married and lived iu Berwick, where his 
descendants lived for several generations. Rev. Thomas 
Stacy, of the Free Baptist denomination, is one of the 
descendants ; report says he is one of their best. 

Benjamin, son of Ichabod, also lived in Berwick. 
The late Gilman Stacy was his grandson. They are all 
gone now; and the houses that Ichabod built. The 



See Chades Dickins' Hist, of England, p. 358. 



Il6. ;■ OLD ELIOT. 

writer well remembers the house where old Dea. Samuel 
Stacy lived, grandfather of the Rev. Samuel Stacy. 
Sarah, married Mr. Pike, of Berwick. 
John, son of Ichabod, was in the Revolution; en- 
listed when twenty years old, and served until nearly the 
close of the war, when he lost a leg ; he married and was 
living in Porter, Oxford Co. in 1812, according to an old 
deed. Received a pension. Died 1838, aged 84 years. 
Betsey, married Nov. 22, 1797, John Frost, jr. 
Alice, married Oct. 27, 1799. Samuel Hodsdon. 
Molly, married June 28, 1792, John Remick, jr.; lived 
in Ossipee, N. H. 

• George, son of Ichabod and Lydia (Guptill) Stacy, born 
1780, left Eliot when a young man and went to Pittston ; 
married, 1807, Betsy Scott, of Wiscassett. Genealogy says 
she came of one of the first families. Respected by all, she 
died in 1870, aged ninety-four years. 

Later they came to Eliot ; bought out the heirs of his 
father's and mother's estate, and lived on the home place 
until he was about sixty-three years old, when he built 
the house w T here George E. Stacy now lives. He owned 
a field there ; but Nathaniel Stacy and his wife owned the 
land next the road. They refused to sell him a houselot, 
so he built in from the road. After they died the land was 
for sale ; and Mr. Stacy bought out to the road. He died 
hi Eliot, 1867, aged 87 years. 

The children of George and Betsey (Scott) Stacy were :- 
fifth Generation : — 
Gilbert, born Nov'r 27, 1807, died 1829-30. 
Daniel, born Feb. 25, 1809 ; m. Elisabeth Ann Whitehouse, 
of South Berwick ; no children. He was a musician in 
his youngjer years ; played the trombone and bass-viol : 
- wrote music and taught singing school ; played the fife 
in his old age. He sung the old tunes until just before 
his death. He died Oct. 1. 1891, of heart failure. 
Lucy Ann, died in infancy. 

Mary E. born March 7, 1814, married John Smith of Pitts- 
ton ; was a milliner ; died in Portland, August, 1871. 



OL.D ELIOT. 117. 

buried in Eliot. 

John, born Sept. 12, 1816, in Eliot; married Mary Gard- 
ner. Married 2, Agnes Ricker, of Berwick. He lived 
to be ninety-two years old. Died at Woburn, Mass. — 
Their only son living, John F. married and is living in 
Chicago ; he is an artist ; teaches in a Technical High 
School in that city. 

George W. born June 10, 1818 ; married Mary Ann Guptil 
of Berwick. His name is on the catalogue of students 
of Berwick Academy, 1838, and Eliot Academy, 1840. 
He was a musician of no mean power ; gave lessons on 
the violin. Children living in Boston. No sons. 

Hannah J. born June 19, 1823, married Mark O. Neil, of 
Bath. She was a born milliner ; conducted the business 
many years in Bath and Portland. Is now living with 
her daughter Jennibel. in Boston. A neighbor made the 
remark, that " Nature did a great deal for that family." 

Lydia A. born Oct. 1, 1828, married Leonard Waterhouse, 
Scarborough, deceased. Lived at Portland, Maine, and 
kept a Milliner's store for many years, as did her elder 
sisters. Her son George Waterhouse, is in the same 
business in Portland. Her daughter, Mrs. Bates, re- 
sides in Boston. 

Joseph, born October 25, 1825, in Eliot ; went to Salem, 
Mass., to work at the couriers trade. Married Mary 
Ricker, of Berwick, May 27, 1856 ; lived in Mass'ts until 
1869, when he returned to Eliot, where 1 is family now 
reside. He enlisted in the Civil War, as musician, in 
Co I, Mass'tts 4, Heavy Artillery; served until the 
War closed. Was fond of music and nature ; enjoyed 
playing on the violin. Died in Eliot July 14, 1905. 

The children of Joseph and Mary (Ricker) Stacy, — 
Sixth Generation: 

Rosalie, born Sept. 23, 1857, died Oct. 29, 1864. 
Freddie, born March 17, 1859, died Sept. 12, 1759. \ 
George E. born Aug. 17, i860, in Salem, Mass., married 
Ada A. Spinney, of South Eliot, Nov. 10, 1894. 



1 18. OLD ELIOT. 

Joseph Walter, born April 29, died June 29, 1865. 

Ralph Winfield, born August 5, 1871, married Mrs. May 

Philbrick, Sept. 2, 1901 ; lives in Lynn, Mass. Trade, 

brickrnason. No children. 
Flora Evelyn, born April 30, 1875, married Oct. 11, 1906, 

Walter W. Grant, of Wells, Maine. They have one 

child. Esther Elisabeth. 

Seventh Generation : — 

Viola Marie, daughter of George E. and Ada A. (Spin- 
ney) Stacy, born June 13. 1895. 

Howard Eugene, son of George E. and Ada A. (Spin- 
ney) Stacy, born October 26, 1896. .- 

Jchabod Stacy's List of Houses. 
The Oiiginal Papers in Possession of George E Stacy. 



Kittery, January 16, 1799 : — 

I hereby present the iollowing list of my dwelling 
houses iu the Town of Berwick, in the North Parish, in 
the County of York : 

One Dwelling house, 32 feet long, 16 feet wide, one 
Story ; Situated on my farm, on two acres of land joining 
the s-tnie ; 5 windows, 12 squares, 6 by 8 inches ; 4 win- 
dows of 6 squares, 6 by 8 inches ; built of wood ; 35 years 
old, half finished ; occupied by my son, Benj. Stacy. 

1 Dwelling house 28 feet long & 14 feet wide, occupied 
by my son, William Stacy ; one story ; 4 windows, 24 
squares, 6 by 8, situated un two acres of land where my 
sou William lives ; built of wood 26 years ago ; no part 
finished. Ichabod Stacy. 

I hereby present the following list of my land, in the 
Town of Berwick, in the North Parish : 1 piece of 68 acres 
after deducting 2 acres for the house occupied by my son 
Benjamin Stacy. 

1 piece of 138 acres, after deducting 2 acres for the house 
occupied by son William Stacy, (chiefly wilderness ) 

Kittery, January i6th, 1799. Ichabod Stacy. 



OLD ELIOT. 119. 



The Fifth Annual Meeting of The Piscataqua Pion- 
eers, was held August 31, 1909, — the members and guests 
meeting at Beacham's stable, Portsmouth, taking convey- 
ance from there to Odiorne's Point, visiting the site of the 
first settlement in New Hampshire ; also the old Cemetery 
and site uf the old Garrison ; thence proceeding to New- 
castle, stopping at Fort Constitution and Walbach Tower ; 
and thence to Hotel Curtis, where the Meeting was called 
to order by the President, J. L. M. Willis, M. D., of 
Eliot, Maine. j 

• The Call for the Meeting was read by the Secretary. 
John Scales, Esq., of Dover, N. H., read a paper 
entitled " The Settlement of Odiorne's Point and Hilton's 
Point, otherwise known as Dover Point." 

The President, J. L. M. Willis, M. D., of Eliot, Maine, 
presented a paper : " The Submission of Maine to Massa- 
chusetts, 1652." 

Hon. Moses A. Safford, of Kittery, Maine, read a paper 
on "The Piscataqua Pioneer, Captain John ■Mason." 

Rev. George M. Bodge, ot Boston, Mass., gave an 
interesting talk on "The Bodge Family, of Kittery, 
Maine." 

An original Poem was read"by William Hale, M. D., of 
Gloucester, Mass., "A Legend of Gosport Town." 

The Secretary's and Treasurer's Reports were read, and 
placed on file. 

Bill from the Secretary for postage and notices was read 
and ordered to be paid. 

Through the Hon. Moses A. Safford, of Kittery, Maine, 
— the State Librarian, of Maine, Hon. E. W. Emery, pre- 
sented the Society with Volumes V to XVI, of York 
Deeds ; and a vote of thanks was extended to him. 

The Secretary reported that he could procure the first 
four volumes, at a small expense ; and, on motion, he was 
appointed the Committee to get the same for the Society. 



120. PISCATAQUA PLANTATION. 

The following were— 

nominated and elected to Membership : 

Charles H. Batchelder, of Portsmouth, N. H. in the right 

of William Cotton, of Portsmouth, N. H. 
Miss Elizabeth Bartlett. of Eliot, Maine, in the right of 

Nathan Bartlett, ot Kittery, now Eliot. 
Miss Mary L. Spinney, of South Eliot, Maine, in the right 

of Caleb Spinney, of Kittery, now Eliot. 
James W. Locke, of Kittery, Maine, in the right of Capt. 

John Locke, of Portsmouth, N. H. 1636, and 

William Sherburne, of Portsmouth, N. H. 1725. 
Edgar A. Leighton, of Somersworth, N., H. in the right 

of Thomas Leighton, of Dover, N. H. 1635, and 

Thomas Edged v, of Dover, N. H., 1665. 
Nathan Goold, of Portland, Maine, in the right of 

Nicholas P'rost, and Goold, Kittery, Maine, 

now Eliot. 
Miss Susan Woodman, of Dover, N. H., in the right of 

John Odiorne, of Portsmouth, N. H. 
Charles Wesley Tibbetts, of Dover, N. H., in the right of 

Henry Tibbetts, of Dover, N. H. 
Mrs. Hannah Chandler Tibbetts, of Dover, in the right of 

Alexander Shapleigh. of Kittery, Maine. 
Mrs. Sophia Hall, of Dover, N. H., in the right of 

Ebenezer Thompson, of Durham, N. H. 
Miss Annie K. Seavey, of Dover, N. H. in the right of 

Thomas Canney, of Dover Neck, 1631,* and 

William Seavey, of Seavey's Island, Isles of 

Shoals, 1633. 
Mrs. Ellen S. Rounds, Dover, N. H., in the right of 

Ralph Twonibly, of Dover. 
William Hale, M. D., of Gloucester, Mass. in the right of 

Nathan Lord, of Kittery, now So. Berwick, Maine. 
Mrs. Ida Estelle (Paul) Fernald, of Worcester, Mass., in 

the right of Daniel Paul, Kittery, now Eliot. 
Mrs. S.irah P. Billings, of Boston, Mass., in the right of 

Hutchins, of 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 121. 

Fred B. Furbish, of Cambridge, Mass., in the right of 

i — Furbish, of Eliot, Maine. 

Waiter N. Weeks, of Whitehall, New York. 

The President appointed Messrs Safford and Moses and 
Mrs. Alice J. Moore, a committee to prepare a list of 
officers for the ensuing year. They presented the follow- 
ing names : — 

President : 

John Scales, Dover, N. H. 

Vice Presidents : 

John M. Moses, Northwood Ridge, N. H. 
J. L. M. Willis, Eliot, Maine. 
Alexander Dennett, Kittery, Maine. 
Oliver P. Remick, Kittery, Maine. 
Mrs. Alice J. Moore, Kittery, Maine. 
Mrs. Florence A. Crane, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Samuel K. Hamilton, Boston, Mass. 
Miss Theodora Chase, Newton, Mass. 
Denison R. Slade, Center Harbor, N. H. 
Rev. George M. Bodge, Boston, Mass. 
Oliver Remick Grant, New York City, N. Y. 

Treasurer. 
Alexander Dennett, Kittery, Maine. 

Secretary. 
Albert H. Lamson, Elkins, N. H. 

Directors. 
Hon. Moses A. Safford, Kittery, Maine. 
Henry W. Fernald, Boston, Mass. 
Albert H. Lamson, Elkins, N. H. 
J. L. M. Willis, M. D. Eliot, Maine. 
Charles A. Hazlett, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Curator. 
Albert H. Lamson, Elkins, N. H. 
—all of whom were elected to serve as officers for one year. 
Letters were read from the following : 
Fred B. Furbish, Mrs. Anna M...Chandler Rider, 

Mrs. Florence A. Crane, Mrs. J. Quincy Billings, 
John Scales, , Charles A. Hazlett, 



122. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. 

A. Augustus Stocker, M. D. 

Frank R. Strong, Walter D. McKinnev, 

Denison R. Slade, Orra E. Momiette, 

George Francis Dow, of the Essex Institute, Salem, Ms. 
Charles H. Houghton, Hist. So., Leominster, Mass. 
Harriette E.' Jones, Hist. So. of Old Newbury, Mass. 
Frank A. Bates, of the Bates Association, 
Ellery L. Goff, Antiquarian Society, Rehoboth, Mass. 
John K. Allen, of Chicago, presented the Society with a 
copy of, — George Morton, of Plymouth Colony, and 
some of his Descendants ; 
Henry, \V. Fernald, of Boston, Mass , a copy ol — A Cen- 
tury of Population Growth in the United States, 
1 790- 1 900 ; 
Miss Juliet Porter, of Worcester, Mass. a copy of — 

A Porter Pedigree ; 
The President, Dr. J. L. M. Willis, a copy of— Old Kittery, 

and volumes of Old Eliot ; 
The Secretary, a copy of Saco Records. 
A vote of thanks was extended to them. 
Communications from Mrs. Lettie M. O'Neil, ot Clare- 
mont, N. H.; Rev. Clarence P. Emery, Chepachet, R. I.; 
William M. Emery, Fall River, Mass., were read, expres- 
ing their desire to withdraw their Membership from the 
Society ; and on motion, their requests were granted. 

The Secretary reported that he had applied to the State 
Librarian of New Hampshire, for a set of " N. H. State 
Papers." A letter was read from him, stating that the 
•" Trustees did not see their way clear" to do so. 

The Secretary announced that the Directors had held a 
meeting, and those members who had not complied with 
the requirements for membership had been dropped. 

The President declared the meeting adjourned, — the 
Society returning by carriage to Portsmouth, over the 
" Three Bridges." Respectfully submitted. 

Albert H. Lamson, Sec'y. 

The various Addresses, of much interest, are upon following pages : — 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 123. 

The President's Address,— J. L. M. Willis, M'.D.: — 

The Submission of Maine to Massachusetts. 

J. L. M. WILLIS. 

On the banks of the Piscataqua, at Watts' Port, just in 
the corner of the highway and the road to Knight's Ferry, 
stood William Everett's Tavern, a great three-storied 
mansion house, which gave, at all hours, accommodation 
to the wayfarer ; and where, in its great front room, many 
of the public meetings of the old town were held. Here, 
in 1652, November 16th, was signed the Submission of 
Maine to Massachusetts, the most important political 
event in the history of the Piscataqua Pioneers; and 
which, in a lew days, was followed by the submission of 
other towns to the eastward. 

It may be of interest to sketch briefly the conditions 
which led up to this important meeting : — 

On the 19th of May, 1643, the Puritan portion of the 
Colonies,— Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and 
New Haven, — believing the opportunity a good one, be- 
cause at this time the Honse of Commons was in sympathy 
with them, formed a compact for mutual aid and counsel. 
The Province of Maine, being under Episcopal rule, 
could not be admitted ; and New Hampshire had made an 
alliance with Massachusetts the year before. 

In 1648, the Province of Maine extended from the Piscat- 
aqua River to the Kennebec; eastward from the Kenne- 
bec, it was known, as the Province of Lygonia. In a 
way these two provinces were rivals ; the former under 
. Gorges, the latter under Rig by ; they were about equal in 
population, although Lygonia was larger in territory. 

After the death of Gorges, — Wells, Georgeana, Kittery 
and the Isles of Shoals, in July, 1649, held a Convention, 
and, after long discussion, they formed a social compact, 
which was as follows : 

•' We with our free and voluntary consent, do bind 
ourselves in a body politic and combination, to see these 
parts of the country and provinces regulated, according 



124. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

to such laws as have formerly been exercised, and such 
others as shall be thought meet, but not repugnant to the 
fundamental laws of our native country." 

They elected Edward Godfrey, Governor ; and Richard 
Leader, Nicholas Shapleigh, Thomas Withers, Edward 
Rishworth, Councillors; Edward Rishworth was also made 
Recorder. This contract was continued two years. 

When they heard of the death of King Charles, they 
indicated their willingness to take direction from Parlia- 
ment, and asked by petition, December ist, 1651, for the 
same rights and privileges as were bestowed on other 
Colonies. 

Previous to this, in October, 1651, at the session of the 
General Court, Massachusetts planned to extend her 
jurisdiction over. Maine, because she had long felt the 
danger of the form of government existing there, so en- 
tirely different from her own. Her people had left their 
homes, many of them of comfort and luxury, for the 
enjoyment of religious freedom ; while Maine's settlement 
was made up of those who had come to seek their fortune 
with no especial regard for any religious principles ; al- 
though they preferred the faith of the Episcopal or High 
Church of England. 

I Winthrop and his government hated to see this directly 
opposite form of Church and State so near ; aud they w r ent 
about shrewdly, to change all this, and prevent the danger 
to themselves. They guessed that their charter, if taken 
literally and a survey made, would give them quite a little 
of Maine territory ; and they voted unanimously, ^on 
March 31st, 1652 : 

4< The extent of the line is to be from the Northernmost 
part of the River Merrimack, and three miles more North 
where it is to be found, be it a hundred miles more or less 
from the sea, and thence upon a straight line East and 
West to each sea. and this to be the true interpretation of 
the Termes of the Limmette Northward granted in the 
Patent." 

They then sent surveyors, or artists as they were called, 



PISCATAOUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 125. 

to look after this ; and marks of their survey may be seen 
in the famous "Endicott Rock," at the outlet of Winnipi- 
seogee, at the Weirs, on the Meredith side ; here is a 
large boulder bearing the inscription: 

E. J. S. W. W. P. IOH.N. - -Endicott, Gov. 

[Initials of Edward Johnson, Simon Willard, Comm'rs 
and the Worshipful John Endicott, Governor.] 

The report of this survey was, that Massachusetts owned 
as far East as the Presumpsco River ; and she immediately 
set about to take possession. On the 14th of October, 
1651, Dep. Gov. Bellingham and Mr. Samuel Symonds, 
Assistant, were selected by the Massachusetts Court, to 
draw up an address to the Governor of Maine. This is 
the gist of it : 

tl Whereas, by the extent of the line of o'r pattent, it 
doth appeare that the towne of Kettery, & many miles to 
the northward thereof, is comp'hended w'thin o'r graunt ; 
& forasmuch as this Courte hath beene informed that 
there hath beene a late endeavor of severall psons -there- 
abouts, to draw the inhabitants of Kettery, who govern 
now by combination, to petition Parlianr t of England, for 
a grant of the sd place, which the major pt ot the inhab- 
itants refused to doe; many of them expressinge theire 
willingness rather to submit themselves to the govern- 
ment of Mass'tts. 

* * This Court takeing into consideracon the p'mises, 
together with the commodiousnes of the River, of Pa scat, & 
how p'judiciall it would be to this government if ye 
afforesd place and river should be posse sed by such as 
are no ffriends to vs, hath ordred, that a lovinge and 
ffriendly l'tre be sent from this Court to the sd inhabitants 
of Kettery, aquay'tinge them w'th o'r affore sd right, & 
Commission granted to Mr. Simon Bradstreete, Major 
Daniel Denison, and Capt. Wm. Hawthorne, to treat with 
them accordinge to instruct's given, to receive them vnder 
this government, if tearms of agreement can be concluded 
vppon by mutual consent : — 

(and then the "lovinge and ffriendly" wise men of Bos- 
ton, added an— Otherwise :) 

" Other wise haveinge made o'r right and layd claim to 
the place, to p'test ag't any further p'ceedings, by vertue 



126. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

of theire combin't or other interest w'tsoever ; and Mr, 
Belingham & Mr Symonds to draw the l'tre and instruc- 
tion accordingly." 

The Commission was made up of her strongest men. 
Bradstreet was a Councilor of long experience ; Denison 
was the Commander of the Militia, and Hawthorne the 
Speaker of the House ; but they returned unsuccessful, 
after proclaiming to the people of Maine the right of 
Massachusetts to govern them ; and they t^ld them that 
they need pay no further attention to Gov. Godfrey or his 
officials. 

Another Commission, consisting of Bradstreet, Simonds, 
Wiggins and Pendleton, in October, 1652, was appointed 
to visit Kittery, with instructions as given in the following 
notice : — 

" To the Inhabitants of Kittery : 

Whereas the General Court Holden at Boston, in the 
last month, did Appoint Us whose Names are here under- 
written, as by their Commission under the Seal of the 
Colony ot the Massachusetts, doth or may Appear By 
Summons to Assemble the Inhabitants of this Town 
together, in Some Place where we Should Judge most 
Convenient, and to declare unto them our Just Right'and 
Interest to & Jurisdiction over the Tract of Land where 
you inhabit, requiring their Subjection there unto. As- 
sureing them they Enjoye equal protection & priviledge 
with them selves. 

This is therefore to Desire you & in the Name of the 
Government of the Massachusetts to require you, and 
every one of you, to Assemble together before us, at the 
house of Wm. Everett, between Seven & Eight of the 
Clock in "the Morning, the 16 of this present Novemb'r, 
to the end afores'd, & to Setle the Goverment amongst you 
Which we hope will tend to the Glory of God and to the 
peace and Welfare of the whole. 

,l Dated the 15th of November, 1652, & Signed 
Simon Bradstreet Tho's Wiggins 

Samuel Simonds Brian Pendleton." 

Accordingly, on Nov. 16, 1652, the Commissioners came 
to'Everett's Inn, and this is the word the Court spoke to 
them when they started on the journey to our borders : 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 127. 

" Whereas you are chosen Commissioners by this Court 
to settle the Civill government amongst the inhabitants of 
Kittery, the Isle of Shoals, Agamenticus, and so to "the 
northerly extent of o'r patent, you are hereby authorized 
and required with all convenient speede to repayre to 
those partes, and there, by Summons, to assemble the 
inhabitants together, — to declare unto them o'r just right 
to, and jurisdiction o'ver those tractes of land where they 
inhabitt, requireing theire subjection thereunto, assuring 
them they shall enjoy equal p'tection and priviledges 
with o'rselves, & to settle the government there — as in 
your wisdomes you shall judge most to conduce to the 
glory of God — and the mayntenance of o'r owne just rights 
and interests; and we doe hereby require all the inhabit- 
ants of the Isle of Shoals & beyond the River of Piscataq 
within the limits of o'r pattent to be aydinge & assisting 
to these o'r Commissioners." 

It is dated Nov'r 8, 1652, and eight days later they were 
here, — Simon Bradstreet, (whose wife, Ann Bradstreet, 
was the first poetess of New England,) and Samuel Sy- 
monds, and Brian Pendleton ; and if several severe rebel- 
lions, and some very rough words tend to God's glory, 
then that day did. That very morning, one John Burs- 
ley, "vttered threatening words," and Charles Frost heard 
him ; so did Michael Brance. The said Bursley was 
brought into open Court ; and after much manifestation of " 
the human, to get out of the scrape and escape punish- 
ment, he confessed and submitted. 

The Everett Inn had a most memorable meeting. There 
were wars and rumors of wars. Not low-minded retalia- 
tions, but honest and outspoken convictions. The early 
men of Kittery were not shallow ; with solid wisdom, with 
clear comprehension of the value of the Maine seacoast, 
they fought against the compulsory surrender to the 
graspingness of Massachusetts. 

But Maine, in 1652, had but "a fringe of settlements" on 
its shores. [In 1642, ten years earlier, there were but 
fifty towns in all New England, and seventy-seven cler- 
gymen.] In Maine, Kittery was the only incorporated 
town. 



128. 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 



At the Eliot Inn, after struggle and discussion, forty 
men and one woman, (Mary Bachiller,) "submitted." 
This is what the Secretary said : 

44 At the time appointed the Inhabitant appeared, a 
Court was held ; after long adjutations with them about 
the whole buisness in hand, they offered to come Under 
the Government of Massachusetts; 

Provided, that the Article & Conditions tendered by 
by themselves might be received as the grounds thereof ; 

Which being wholly denyed by the Commissioners, who 
told them they must first Submitt to the Government & 
they Should be ready to Afford them Such priviledges & 
Immunities as they Shall think meet to Grant. Where- 
upon at Length they did Submitt as Follows : 

V Wee whose Names are Under written do Acknowl- 
edge our Selves Subject to the Government of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay, in New England : 



William Chatburne, 
Hugh gunison; 
The mark N. F. of 

Nicholas ffrost 
Humphrey Chadburue 
Abraham Cunly (Conley) 
Thomas Spencer 
Anthony Emery- 
Reginald Jenkins 
John White 
Thomas Jones 
Dennys Downing 



Mary bachiller 
Jeremiah Shires 
John Aandrews 
Robert RM. Mendum 
Daniell Paull 
Nic : Shapleigh 
John Hord 
Daniell Daviss 
the marke of 

Ryse Thomas 
John Deamunt (Diamond) 
Thomas Spinny 



Thomas Durston (Duston.) John Bursley 



Tho Withers 
John Wincoll 
John Simons 
Charles ffrost 
Richard Nason 
Robert Waymouth 
Jhon Greene 
hujbrecht Mattone 
Govven Willson 
Willi Pallmer 



Jame» Emory 
Nathan Lord 
Antipas Maverick 
Christian Rtmick 
Joseph Milles 
William Everett 
George Leader 
Philip Babb 

The last eight names 

were added the following day. 



The Commissioners having arranged that a 1 Deputy 
should be sent to Boston Court, and that we should be 



PlSCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 129. 

called Yorkshire, and have our own Militia and M General 
Training- Day," went back to Boston content. 

Nicholas Shapleigh, the strongest opposer of the Sub- 
mission, and the most marked public character of that 
date was selected for County Treasurer; 

Thomas Dunstan and Robert Mendam were sworn 
Constables ; 

Hugh Gunnison was licensed to keep an Ordinary, and 
sell wine and strong water, and . pay the Government 
twenty shillings the butt. 

Thus Kittery began its new life and associations in 
1652, with two hotelb, two constables, and all the equip- 
nientsof office and men. 

Hugh Gunnison, in six months, asked to have his 
twenty-shillings reduced to ten ; and Massachusetts said, 
— Yes. 

We will not close this mere outline of a memorable 
event without another allusion to Everett's Ordinary, or 
Inn. It is the historic house of earliest Eliot. It stood 
upon the lands now in possession of Mrs. Pierepont 
Hammond. To this day the line oi the cellar walls can 
be traced. It was a very large house ; and was the rest- 
ing place of the travellers who came or went across the 
Ferry. Many were the prominent people who tarried 
there for a meal, or for a night's rest. 

It was used also for State assemblies, Courts and Town 
affairs. Capt. Everett, the proprietor, was a man who 
adapted himself to people of rank and title, and to the 
plain "goodrnan," with his ax or hoe. 

The ancient road came up from the Ferry, and went by 
it; and on the riverside was the Ferryman's house, also 
traceable today by its cellar lines. 

William Everett was the last citizen who signed the 
Submission. 

. Could we give the history of each of these signers, it 
would indeed be a pleasure ; but, alas, of many of them, 
only the slightest record is left, and that but in scattered 



130. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

bits. I have collected as much as my limited time and 
opportunity allow. . The following is a copy of the Massa- 
chusetts Grant to the town : 
The Grant to Kittery, Novem*r 20, 1652 : 

Whereas the Town of Kittery have Acknowledged 
themselves Subject to the Government of the Massachu- 
setts Bay in New England as by the Subscription under 
hands, bareing date the 1 6th of this Instant, it doth 
Appear. — 

Wee the Commissioners of the General Court of the 
Massachusetts for the setling of Government among them 
& the rest within the bounds ut their Charter Northerly 
to the Full and just Extent of their line, have thought 
meet and Actually do grant as iolloweth, to Wit : 

1. That ye whole Tract of Land beyond ye river of 
Piscataqua, northerly, togeather with ye Isles ol Shoals, 
within our sd bounds is and Shall be hence forth a County 
or Shire, called by the name of York Shire. 

2. That people Inhabiting there Shall Enjoy protec- 
tion, Equal Acts of favour & Justice with the rest of the 
People Inhabiting on the South side of the river of Piscat- 
aqua, within the Limitts of our whole Jurisdiction. 

3. That Kittery shall be 8c remain a Town Ship & 
have & Enjoy the priviledges of a Town, as other of the 
Jurisdiction have & do Enjoy. 

4. That they shall Enjoy the Same bounds that are 
Clear, between Town & Town, as have been formerly 
Granted, when Commissioners of Each bordering Town 
have Viewed and returned to us or to the General Court 
the ir Survey. 

5. That both Each Town & Every Inhabitant Shall 
have & Injoy all their Just proprieties. Titles and Inter- 
ests in their houses and Lands which they do possess, 
whither by Grant of the Town or of the Jurisdiction, or of 
the former General Court. 

6. That the Town of Kittery by their Freemen Shall 
send one Deputy yearly to the Court of Election, and it 
Shall be in their Libertie to send to each Court Two 

Deputvs if they think good. 

# * * # 

14 Provided always that Nothing in this our Grant 
Shall Extend to determine the Infringing of any person's 
right to any Lands or Inheritance, whether by Grant, by 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 131. 

Patent, or otherwise, where possession is had; but Such 
Titles Shall be left to be heard and Determined by due 
Course of Law. 

And after other matters therein contained, 

it was Subscribed : — 

Simon Bradstreet Tho's Wiggin 
Samuel Simonds Brian Pendleton 

The within written is a True Copy as appears of Record 
in the County of York. Exam'd, 

p. Jos: Hammond, Cier. 
Compared with the Copy on file, — 

p, Jos: Hammond, Cler. 
A true Copy on file, — p. Elisha Cook, Cler. 

Nine years after Massachusetts' assumption of authority, 
the rule o 4 Cromwell having come to an end, and royalty 
restored again, Parliament pronounced the claim of Mas- 
sachusetts unlawful and unfounded ; Commissioners were 
sent, ordering directly from the King that Massachusetts 
give up her claim and return the province to its rightful 
owners. Massachusetts refused to do this ; and, when 
the King's Commissioners attempted to set up a govern- 
ment, sent men of her own to form a court, with orders to 
arrest an> who disputed her authority. 

Constant struggles went on, and conditions were most 
unsettled, until, in 1667, Massachusetts succeeded in 
purchasing the charter from the heirs of Gorges, which 
gave them at last an undisputed title, and government 
became settled. 

Items, — concerning the Signers of.the^Submission ; 

and their location as far as known : 

JOHN ANDREWS 

John Andrews was one of the first settlers on the river, 
at what is now known as Paul's Landing. 

He sold his property to Daniel Paul and Bartholomew 
Smith, March 21, 164S, and moved to Braveboat Harbor. 

At the session of the Court, held at Saco, June 25, 1640, 
he is mentioned in a list of those present. 



132. : piscataqua pioneers, addresses. 

In 1649, under date of October 16, he is again mentioned 
in the Court record, in an order by the Court, to cut a 
road from Rogers' Cove to warehouse Point, by way of 
Braveboat Harbor, Georgeana, to cut to Andrews' land, 
and the inabitants of Pascataquack from this one. 

He died before July 4. 1671 ; for,- on that date, the Court 
made his wife Joan (or Joane, ) Admx. 

PHILIP BABB. 

Philip Babb, resided at the Isles of Shoals, after 1652 ; 
but before that, he is recorded as "of Kittery." 

March 18, 1653, his name is joined with twenty others 
on a petition to the Massachusetts General Court, * asking 
that the Shoals be erected into a separate Township ; — 
upwards of one hundred men lived there then. 

This was granted eight years afterward and, in a brief 
time, the same year, his name was associated, under com- 
mission from Massachusetts, with Major Bryan Pendleton, 
Nicholas Shapleigh and others, in the Government of 
these "Isles." 

He was evidently of clear intellect, and familiar, per- 
haps, with law, as in 1666 he was empowered to take 
depositions. .# 

He had finished his career in 1674; for, two years later, 
we read : 

il June 24, 1676. Joseph Hall petitioned.; the .Court for 
recompense for maintaining two years, Peter Babb, son of 
Philip ; :the fatherland mother both being dead, and the 
child five, years old next Michaelmas ; the Court, June 27, 
1676, bind r Peter as an apprentice to Joseph Hall ...until he 
reachesthe age of twenty-one." 

A cove, just at the s^uth of the landing atj Appledore, 
still bears the na.me,[B abb's Cove. 

MARY B AC HELLER. 

Mary B<\cheller, was the third wife of the Reverend 
Stephen Bacheller, of Hamptou, N. H., who came to this 
country from England, June 5. 1632, on', the William a?id 
Francis. In 1647, he moved to Portsmouth, and took ... her 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. I33. 

as his housekeeper, and very soon made her his wife. — 
He was then eighty-seven years of age. He was fined for 
not publishing his marriage. In a short time he applied 
for a divorce ; it was not granted to him. 

He returned to England, 1655, and died in London in 
1660, at the age of one hundred years. 

He was one of the original settlers of the town of Hamp- 
ton t N-. H., and gave it its name. He was the leader of 
the enterprise in settling Hampton, and he was the first 
minister of Lynn. 

In 1656, she obtained a divorce ; in her application 
therefor, she stated in the petition to the Court, that her 
husband, the Reverend Stephen Bachelier, "upon some 
pretended ends of his owu, had gone to England, and had 
taken a new wife ;" and she expressed her wish to be at 
liberty to marry if she should have a good opportunity 
and the Lord should so incline her heart. 

July 4, 1674, she sold to Peter Staple her lot of land, 
granted to her by Thomas Gorges, and re-granted by the 
Town of Kittery. Thomas Turner, her husband, joined 
with her in the deed. 

■ / - JOHN BURSLEY. . j 

John Bursley, Nov. 28, 1639, married Joane, daughter 
of the Rev'd Joseph Hull, of Barnstable. 

He was Constable in 1645. He bought houses and land 
of George Barlow, March 25, 1648, and specified certain 
cows that he gave in part payment, one of which he had 
of his brother Jones. 

In 1652, he threatened the Commissioners, and all others, 
who should submit to the government of Massachusetts. 
He was complained of by Charles Frost and Michael 
Brand ; was arrested, but confessed, and signed the Sub- 
mission, and was discharged. 

HUMPHREY CHADBOURN. 

Humphrey Chadbourn had a deed from Sagamore 
Rowles, May, 1643, of a portion of the land that was 
originally granted to Mason by Gorges. Mason's heirs . 
tried to recover from Chadbourn and Spencer, bringing 
suit against the latter, but failed. 



134- PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

He is said to have succeeded Gibbon as Steward at 
Newichawannock. 

His house was north of the mill grant ; a half mile'of 
ground between the Little and the Great Rivers. 

January 25, 1640, his name is found among others, as 
present at the Court in Saco. 

He was elected Sefectman, in 1651. 

At Winepiesocket, in June, 1694, he made the acquain- 
tance of Indians who wished to make friends with the 
English. He reported this to the General Court of 
Massachusetts. 

He was one of the Stewards sent by JohnjMason ; he 
came to Portsmouth in 1631, where he resided a few years, 
and then took up his home at South Berwick. He was 
appointed to take charge of the plantations on the river, 
and established himself at the Falls. In 1643 he purchased 
a large tract of land of the Indians ; apart of which still 
remains in the family. 

He was a Representative to the General Court at Boston, 
in 1657-9. In 1662, he was one of the Associates for the 
County of York. 

He had built what was called The Great House in Ports- 
mouth, and was engaged in public affairs of Kittery until 
his death. 

His widow (he had married Lucy Treworthy,) married 
twice after his death : first, Thomas Milles, in March, 
1669 ; and for her third husband, Capt. ^lias Stielman. 
WILLIAM CHADBOURN. 

William Chadbourn w r as evident^ a carpenter ; as 
the earliest mention of him is that he came from England 
in the Pied Cow, with two other carpenters ; and their 
purpose was to erect mills for Ambrose Gibbons, at 
Newichawannock. Their work was truly historic ; for 
the buildings erected were the first saw-mills of New 
England. 

. The vessel landed half a mile below the Falls ; and not 
only unladed William Chadburn and his associates, but 
also brought to the shore some fine Denmark cattle ; and 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. I35. 

i 
i 

the landing-place to this day bears the name of Cow Cove, \ 

William Chadbourn soon became possessed of land [ 

granted him by Capt. John Mason, upon which land he 1 

built a house. 

He was the father of Humphrey Chadbourn ; they both 
signed the Submission. 

ABRAHAM CUNLY. 

Abraham Cunly wasamong those present from Kittery 
in the Saco Court, in 1640. 

In 165 1, he was a Selectman: 

He owned a six-acre lot, next below William Everett's 
land. 

His daughter, Judith, married Nathan Lord, another of 
the Submission signers. 

"He is mentioned in the grant from the Commissioners, 
where he is given liberty to appeal in respect of his case, 
where he was fined ten pounds, 165 1. 

In his Will, March 5, 1691, he made a bequest to Abra- 
ham Fry, " With whom I now live." 
DANiEL DAVIS. 

Daniel Davis was in Kittery in 1649 ; a freeman, 1652. 
He probably lived on land just north of Antipas Maverick 
between Cammock's Creek and Hill's Creek or Davis 
Creek. 

JOHN DIAMOND. 

Joh * Diamond was a ship-builder; and owner, after 
Alexander James, of a very large part of the land now 
known as Kittery Foreside, purchased of James, or Jones, 
june 15, 1651. He is spoken of in the deed, as a rope- 
maker. 

In 1629. he was Constable ; 1662, Clerk of the Writs. 

He died about 1667. His home was probably not far ^ • 

from the -Public Library in Kittery. 

His name revives the terrors and the miseries of some 
of the people of the long ago :— 

In 1682, it is recorded that, at his shipyard, Nicholas 
Shapleigh was killed at the launching of a ship, April 29. 



I36. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

In 1692, a pitiful story is still rehearsed of John Dia- 
mond, who was probably his son, who was taken captive 
by the Indians and tortured to death, at the date of the 
attack on Wells, in King William's War, 1692. 
DENNYS DOWNING. 

Dbnnys^ Downing, was a blacksmith. 1650, Dec. 18, 
he bought land lying toward Watts' Fort and Frank's 
Fort, — consisting of a houselot and thirty acres of upland. 

1694, on the 16th of August, £ike says, eight persons 
were killed or captured by Indians at Long Reach, three 
at Tobey's, and five at Dowuing's. 

He probably lived on the estate now owned by Mrs. 
James Coleman. 

His son was ambnshed, and shot with Major Charles 
Frost, July 4, 1697, coming from church at Newich- 
awannock. A letter from Richard Waldron to Gov. 
Stoughton, dated July 5, 1697, says that Maj; Charles 
Frost, "himself and seven or eight in Company, yesterday, 
in the afternoon coming homeward from meeting at 
Nechoironke, were ambushed by ye enemy. The Major, 
and one Heard's wife were shot down dead ; Heard and 
young Downing wounded ; — the latter mortally." 

His son, Joshua Downing, claimed and, after a law-suit, 
with Col. Joseph Hammond, obtained a lot of land ex- 
tending from Watts' Fort to Miller's Cove. 
THOMAS DUSTON. 

Thomas Duston, 1654, June 19th, had a grant of twenty 
acres, it reached from Crooked Lane to Spruce Creek ; 
afterwards owned by Robert Cutt, who built a Garrison 
Honse on it, — in which William Whipple, a Signer of the 
Declaration of Independence, was born. 

He was the father of Thomas Duston. of Haverhill, who 
was the husband of the renowned Hannah Duston, of 
Indian fame, who was captured by Indians, with' her 
nurse and babe, in the night ; when her captors were 
asleep, she arose with other captives, and killed them all, 
— twelve in number, — and brought home their scalps. 

At the time of the Submission, he was appointed 
Constable for Kittery, with Robert Mendum. 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. I37. 

ANTHONY EMERY. 

Anthony Emmry lived where the descendants of Joseph 
Merrill now live, in Eliot. 

He had a Ferry, known as Cold Harbor Ferry ', last known 
as Morrill 's frerry, — kept by Joel Morrill. 

He was licensed to keep an Ordinary, in 1650. 

The location of his house is still visible, a little to the 
north of the Ferry Road, near the old Ferry Landing. 

In 1652, he was one of the Townsmen, or Selectmen. 

He was a carpenter in Romsey, England, and came over 
in the James, April, 1635. Settled in Newbury, Mass ; 
removed to Dover, in 1637 ; was one of the Proprietors. — 
In 1651, he sold his property in Dover, and removed to 
Cold Harbor, in Maine. 

His earliest home was in Kittery ; he evidently pur- 
chased it in J648. It was designated as on Sturgeon 
Creek. The deed covers house, field and marshes. "The 
location is still visible." 

Again, in 1650, he bought of Joseph Austin, "a little 
house," above Sturgeon Creek, and also one thousand 
five hundred foote of boards ; ,J and he paid for the same 
" Two stears," one named Dragon and the other BenBow ; 
and, in addition, he did "a week's work," with two other 
oxen. 

He was evidently a man of clean thought, and in ad- 
vance of the early times ; for he was not only a friend, but 
he entertained the Quakers, though they were, by law, to 
be disregarded, and, if possible, annihilated. He recog- 
nized the higher law \ and preferred "penalty" rather than 
a violated conscience. 

His wife's name was Frances. 

JAMES EMERY. 

James Emery, son of Anthony Emery, lived on land 
afterward sold to Joseph Hammond, and on which he built 
a Garrison House, with a stockade around it^, — which was 
often attacked by the Indians, but never captured. 

He lived north of Birch Point Cove, South Berwick. 



I38. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

1654, be had a grant of land of fifty acres. 
1696, he sold the land to Philip Hubbard, whose Garrison 
House stood on the spot where the late Isaac Libbey's 
house stands. 

In 1697, we find his name on a petition to Gov'r Stough- 
ton and Council, asking that the tax of Kittery and Ber- 
wick be abated. 

In 171 1, there was a Garrison House on Emery's land. 

He was a Selectman for several years ; and Represen- 
tative to the General Court at Boston, in 1676. 

WILLIAM EVERETT. 
William Everktt came from Kittery Point ; was 
licensed to keep an Ordinary, in 1649; ai] d the said Or- 
dinary, most surely became a chapter of history. 

This Tavern was where the Commissioners met the 
inhabitants of Kittery, and where the Submission was 
signed. It was located where the road from Trickey's 
Ferry, afterwards known as Knight's Ferry, came into the 
highway. 

This Tavern was a very large house, — three stories 
The marks of the cellar may still be seen in the front yard 
of Mrs. Rebecca Hammond, on the River Road in Eliot. 

He probably bought his land of Wannerton. 

He was a sea-captain, and lostat sea, as was his son also. 

His only daughter married Nathan Lord. 

His widow married Isaac Nash of Dover ; they sold the 
Everett property, in Eliot, in 1656, to William Leighton ; 
for many years it was known as Leightoii Pohit. It was 
first known as Point Joslyn. 

At the first Court in the Province of Maine, held in 
Saco, in 1636, William Everett's name appears. 

CHARLES FROST. 

Charles Frost was born and lived at the foot of 
Frost's Hill, or Great Hill. The remains of the founda- 
tion of his house may yet be seen in the field of Newberry 
Paul, next east of Moses A. Frost. 

He and others were given authority, in 1692, to select 
a lot, aBd build a Meeting-house. 



PISCAtfAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 139. 

1658, he was Deputy to the General Court, and the five 
years following. 

In 166S, July 6, he was Captain of the Militia of [Maine. 
No man of his time was more honored and respected ; and 
he w T as a leader in Town Meetings, and the affairs of the 
Church. 

The Indians hated him more than any other man; 
ambushed him with others in 1697. 

He was one of the Associate Judges of the State'of 
Maine ; and a member of the Governor's Council, in 1693. 

And honor and respect were not limited to the years of 
his life and residence here ; his public labors, his value to 
the town, and the localities that yet bear his name, are 
familiar still ; and it is pleasant to speak of and to revive 
his memories. 

NICHOLAS FROST. 

Nicholas Frost : In 1637, Alexander Shapleigh and 
James Treworgy agree with neighbors dwelling at Stur- 
geon Creek, that there shall always be a highway from 
Nicholae Frost's house, "down to Sturgeon Ck and soe 
along to the Leaders." This evidently was the home of 
Nicholas Frost in 1637. 

In 1640, June 25, Nicholas Frost was present at a Court 
Session, held in Saco. 

In 1648, July 16, the first Selectmen of Kittery were 
appointed : Nicholas Shapleigh, John Heard, Nicholas 
Frost. 

1652. He was Attorney for one Thompson in a suit 
brought against him. 

1661. " Two tracts of land granted by Town of Kittery 
to Nicholas Frost and Anthonie Emerie," are alluded to ; 
the lands given in former years. 

1687. Cedar Road referred to, — at Sturgeon Creek, — 
led through Nicholas Frost's land. 

In 1693, his wife was taken captive by the Indians. 

In 1698, he was reported as drowned. 



140. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

JOHN GREENE. 

John Greene's land was bounded by the highway and 
land of Peter Staples, at South Eliot, a little below 
Frank's Fort. In 1650, he was a Juryman. 

In 1654, he had a lot of fifty acres granted him, not far 
from Birch Point, near the so-called Eliot and Dover 
Bridge. 

In 1647, he was a Member of the Board of Arbitration. 

He was dead before July, ,1683. 

HUGH GUNNISON. 

Hugh Gunnison succeeded William Hilton as tavern- 
keeper at Kittery Point. 

He leased from Major Nicholas Shapleigh, June 5, 
1651, five hundred acres of land, "at the Poynt where Mr. 
Wm. Hilton now dwelleth ; and 'upwards towards Capt. 
Francis Champernown's land." 

He married for his second wife, Sarah (Kelley) Lynn, 
widow of Henry Lynn. At the time of their marriage, 
the widow was living in an old house by the river, belong- 
ing to Nicholas Shapleigh. 

His widow married John Mitchell ; and later, Surgeon 
Francis Morgan. She continued her former husband's 
business, and kept an Ordinary, which was later carried 
on under license, July 4, 1671, to Thomas Morgan. 

Robert Mendnm also kept an Ordinary at the Point, 
and evidently was not on good terms with his competitor 
in the business, lor in the Court re i ord for 1650, we find 
that Goody Mendum was fined five pounds for saying, 
" The Devil take Mr. Gullison and his wife." 

He owned a saw mill on Tucker's Cove, Spruce Creek. 

In 1699, he was appointed to keep a Ferry over Spruce 
Creek. This crossed the Creek a little to the south of the 
present bridge. 

He had a long lawsuit with Nicholas Shapleigh, about 
the sale of a piece of land at Kittery Point. 

He was appointed Associate Judge, in 1652, by the 
Commissioners. 



PlSCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES I4I. 

After the Submission, Oct. 23. 1653, he was indicted for 
letting his daughter stay at home from Church a whole 
month at a time. 

He was sued by Nicholas Shapleigh ; he resisted the 
Major on account of his manner of serving the writ ; Dec. 
20 1653, "he gave the Major the law bucke, bidding him 
lucke in it and acte according to lawe, and he would not 
hender him." 

fBHe died before March 26, 1660; for then his widow, 
Sarah, wrote to Captain Davenport, asking him to help 
her inthe settlement of her business before she married. 

NICHOLAS SHAPLEIGH. 

Nicholas Shaplkigh was born in 1610 ; and was the 
son of Alexander Shapleigh who built the first house in 
Kittery, — at the Point ; and was one of the leading men 
of his time. He owned a saw-mill at Spruce Creek. His 
farm at the Creek was known as Oak Point Farm. 

1653, Nov. 24, the Selectmen confirmed to him those 
tracts of laud formerly owned by Cammock and Wannerton, 
running from the Piscataqua along the Mill Creek, now 
known as Shapleigh Creek, and between said Creek and a 
little brook near Goody Everett's and back half-way to 
York. 

He was extensively engaged in lumbering; being in- 
terested in mills on Sturgeon, Spruce and Cammock's 
Creeks. He received but little from the town ; he had 
great influence with the people, yet never made use of his 
power to enrich himself. He purchased many tracts of 
land ; and one of them includes the Township of Shapleigh 
to perpetuate his name. 

He first resided at Kittery Point ; but, in 1655, his home 
was at Sandy Hill, at or near the homestead of the late 
Capt. Elisha Shapleigh. 

He early became a very distinguished man in Kittery 
and the Province. He was one of Gov. Vine's Council in 
1644, which sat at Saco. He was one of the Provincial 
Committee, County Treasurer, one of the Board of Select- 



I 4 2. 



PISGATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 



men ; one of the Commissioners who held the first term of 
Court in York County ; and Justice of the Peace. At the 
first regular organization of the Militia of York County, 
into a regiment, he was appointed Commandent, and was 
required to meet with the officers for improvement in mili- 
tary tactics, and to see that the soldiers were well armed, 
equipped and disciplined. 

In 1678, Maj. Shapleigh, Capt. Champernowne and 
Capt. Fryer ot Portsmouth, were appointed by the Gov- 
ernment of Massachusetts, Commissioners to settle Peace 
with Squando and the S.agamores of Androscoggin and 
Kennebec Rivers ; they met the Indians at Casco, and on 
the 12th of April, 1678, ended a most distressing three 
years' war. 

His sympathies were with the Quakers ; and for shel- 
tering and giving entertainment to their preacher, he was 
deposed as Selectman. He was imprisoned in 1674 for 
sheltering two men, accused of piracy, and fined ^"200 ; 
for, as he expressed it, his compassion overcame his reason. 

- In the early part of April, 1682, he was for the last time 
elected to office, — Representative to the Massachusetts 
General Court. 

* A few days later, April 29, he was accidentally killed at 
the shipyard of John Diamond, in Kittery, while viewing 
the launching of a ship : the moment the vessel started, a 
spar struck him. 

- His wife's name was Alice. He left no children. 

THOMAS RYSE. : 

Thomas Ryse wa» born, 1614. 

In 1646, he worked in a brew house ; and lived in vari- 
ous places from Brave-Boat Harbor up. 

1647, December, he bought land on Spruce Creek, not 
far from Crockett's Neck. 

1684, complaint was made that he was "very sick ; in 
deep suffering." The Selectmen were ordered to help 
him at once. 



•PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 143. 

- CHRISTIAN REMICK. 
Christian Remick : A large tract of land belonging to 
Christian Remick was sold by his son to John Dennett, jr. 
— a part of that which is now known as the Old Dennet 
Farm, in Kittery. 

Received the first grant before 165 1 : and others fol- 
lowed, making two hundred and forty acres. 

He was a Surveyor, Treasurer and Selectman. 

He lived on Eliot Neck, just at the beginning of the 
Long Beach ; probably on the south side of the road, near 
the water, on the land owned today by Marshall Huntress. 
THOMAS SPENCER. 

Thomas Spencer. In early days the landed estates of 
Kittery settlers, was not always secure. Some, who were 
heirs of the earliest comers, were obliged to surrender ; 
but to others the lands were confirmed. 
V Thomas Spencer was one who had the good fortune to 
have a deed from the Sagamore of this realm.. He is 
called Sagamore Rowles ; and to Thomas he secured the 
land. This was in 1643. 

. It was a favorable homestead ; for in 1652, we read of 
corn mills and saw mill, not far from his dwelling; and 
both were conveniences for farm-life in those early years. 

Thomas Spencer was here as early as 1630, as shown 
by deposition. He lived just below Mason's, or Great 
Works' Mill, by the Steep Fall. 

He married Patience, daughter of Willi? m Chadbourn. 

He was farmer, lumberman, and tavern-keeper. 

He deeded to his son William, Dec. 20, 1669, "the tim- 
ber in Tim Sinker's swamp." 

He died Dec. 15, 1681. His wife died 1653. 
THOMAS SPXNNEY. 

Thomas Spinnky lived at the end of Eliot Neck. Had 
a grant of land of two hundred acres on both sides of the 
Great Cove,' later called Spinney's Creek, thus perpetua- 
ting his name and residence. 
. 1691, the Court ordered a road built from York to the 



144- PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

house of Thomas Spinney ; this was an advantage, as it 
connected with a Ferry, across the river, near Pulpit 
Rock, where Jones' Wharf now is, and where the road 
started that went to Boston. 

His will is dated July 9, 1701, and probated the follow- 
ing September ; and, "aged and very weak, bequeathes 
his property to his children and grandchildren." 
JOHN HORD. 

John Hord, (or Heard,) was a carpenter and yeoman. 
He was a noted Indian fighter, and lived where James 
Bartlett now resides. 

1640, June 25th, he was present with others at Court 
held in Saco. 

In 1648, he was one of the Selectmen. 

At John Heard's house, the Selectmen of Kittery met 
with prominent men of Berwick, to arrange matters after 
the Town of Berwick was incorporated, Sept. 29, 1713. 

He was with Charles Frost when ambushed by the Indi- 
ans. His wife, Phoebe was wounded and fell from her 
horse. She begged her husband to leave her and save the 
children at home. She was killed, and he was wounded, 
July 4, 1697. 

In 1663, July 7, he was fined forty shillings for enter- 
taining Quakers. 

REGINALD JENKINS. 

Reginald Jenkins built a house and for several years 
lived on a lot of land between Thcjias Jones and Joshua 
Downing. It was probably east of Watt's Fort. This lot 
was south of Thomas Jones'. 

He later lived at Cold Harbor Ferry ; his laud adjoined 
the John Merritt estate. 

In 1640, he was a Quaker, as was his daughter ]also ; 
and was often in Court for not attending Church on the 
Lord's Day. 

THOMAS JONES. 

Thomes Jones was born ,1609 ; and lived between 
Reginald Jenkins' and William Everett's land. After- 



PISCATAOUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES 



■45- 



wards both lots belonged to John Leighton. 
In 1639, he worked for Alexander Shapleigh. 
In 1676, he was supported by the town. 

GEORGE^EADER. 
In 1651, the town granted George Leader one-fourth of 
the land between Crooked Lane and Spruce Creek. On a 
partol this land is now standing the old Whipple house, 
owned and occupied by Mr. Harrison Philbrick. 

1654. He bought of Richard Nason a section ot land 
four rods wide, running south from "Pipe Stave Point, " 
and down the river to the next fresh water creek. 

He settled at Newichawannock in 1652. He was a 
Juryman in 1664. 

1651. The town granted the Leaders the use of the mills 
and water privileges, built by Chadbourne, Mason's agent, 
in 1634, which then were abandoned and nearly destroyed ; 
also one-fourth mile either side. 

The Leaders rebuilt the mills, and put in a gang of 
nineteen saws, which never worked satisfactorily ; and 
which the settlers, in derision, called The Great Works. 
The name finally became fixed to the settlement and the 
river, —which bear this name today. 

' ANTIPAS MAVERICK. 

AntipaS Maverick bought of Edward Small, (a kins- 
man of Sir Ferdinando Gorges,; June 23, 1647, the tract of 
land lying between the two creeks : that on the south side 
of his home known as Mill Creek, otherwise known as 
Cammocks and Shapleigh Creek ; and on the north side 
by Davis Creek, otherwise known as Daniel's Creek. 

He is thought to have been the son of the Rev. John 
Maverick, and brother of Samuel Maverick of Noddles 
Island or East Boston. 

He came to Kittery from the Isles of Shoals. Was 
licensed to keep an Ordinary in 1659. 

Died 1678, July 2nd. 

GOWEN WILSON. 

Gowkn Wilson's house (a garrison house,) stood near 



I46. PISGATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

the'junction of the Norton Road, with the road along the 
east side of Spruce Creek. 

June 2d, 1684, he gave eleven acres a» a wedding gift to 
his son-in-law, Andrew Haley, who married his only 
daughter, Deborah. Haley formerly lived at the Shoals. 

JOHN WHITE.' 

John White planted, with Menduin, on the west side of 
Spruce Creek, between the Creek and Crooked Lane. 

1640, March 3, he was granted a lot, ".next unto Pound- 
ings, — 24 rods by the w T ater side, and so back into the 
woods, — unto the way that goes from Cold Harbor into 
Sturgeon Creek. 

In 1679, he testified to the location of Cedar Road forty- 
two years before. 

CAPTAIN JOHN WXNCOLL. 

Capt. John WiNCdtt, came from Watertown. 

In 1651, he bought ot John Heard thirty acres of land, 
which were the second lot above Shorey's Brook. 

He bought land between Sturgeon Creek and the Cove 
above it, for his brother. 

1652, he had a grant from the town, which he sold to 
Roger Plaisted, — spoken of as the Birch Point Lot. 

He was a brother of Thomas Broughton, a merchant of 
Boston, who was a large owner in the mills at Sturgeon 
Creek, Quamphegan and Salmon Falls. 

He also had a grant above Richard Tozier's one hun- 
dred acres ; and he bought (back of it,) fifty acres more, 
on the old road to Berwick above Salmon Fails. 

Several years he was Representative to the General 
Court, viz., 1653-54-55, and 1675-77-78. Many times he 
was a Selectman. 

He was part owner with Broughton and John Hall, in 
the saw mills, at Salmon Falls ; and large tracts of lumber 
near them. 

He was a Surveyor also, and a large part of the lands 
in Berwick were laid out by him. 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. I47. 

He was Associate Judge, and Justice of the Peace, for 
many years ; also Register of Deeds, Register of Probate, 
and Clerk of the Courts. 

He was Captain in the Militia, 1675 ; and while with 
his Company at Scarboro, his house at Salmon Falls was 
burned by the Indians. 

He married Mary Etheriugton, 1675; and Olive, widow 
of Roger Plaisted, before 1683. . 

October 22, 1694, he fell off his horse and was killed. 
THOMAS WITHERS. 

Thomas Withers, born 1606, came to w this section 
about 1630. 

Gorges gave him four hundred acres, at Kittery, op- 
posite Portsmouth; and Vines gave him six hundred 
acres at Spruce Creek. 

1652, May 24, the town confirmed the grant from Vines, 
and added two hundred acres more. 

He was a leader in town affairs. 

1644. he was a Commissioner; 1651, a Selectman ; 
1652, appointed Judge, by the Massachusetts Commis- 
sioners ; 1656, Deputy to the General Court. 

1684, Dec. 22, he and his wife Jane, ("being of great 
age and waxing antient,") gave their sheep and cows to 
their daughter Elizabeth, and he had previously deeded 
one half of his farm, in 1651, to his daughttr Sarah, on 
her marriage to John Shapleigh. 

He died in 1685. 

ROBERT WAYMOU1H. 

Robert Waymouth lived just north of Greenacre Inn, 
on a part of the John Greene land. He came from Dart- 
mouth, England. 

He* died in 1662. 

After passing through several hands, his place was sold 
to Joseph Hammond. Here the famous Hammond Gar- 
rison was built, and surrounded by a stockade. 



148. ' PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

JOHN SIMONS. 

John Simons was with John Mason's Company in 1634. 
He was a surveyor, or lot layer, before 1652. 

1659, Selectman. 

His farm at the Neck was granted him by the Town. 

His second wife was Welthea, widow of John Stoddard, 

of Dover Neck. With her he moved to Dover, giving his 

land in Eliot to his son-in-law, William Hilton. He 

probably lived where the Edward Paul house now stands. 

JEREMIAH SHIRES. 

Jeremiah Shires, lived next north of Mendum, be- 
tween Mendum's Cove and Mass Cove. Sold this prop- 
erty in 1664. 

His house was probably not far from the Kittery 
Junction Station. 

He had a law-suit in Dover Courts, in 1650. " 

Removed to Cape Nottocks in York. 

. JOSEPH MILLS. 
Feb. 23, 1629, Joseph Mills bought eight acres of land 
of John Billings and John Larder, fishermen at Spruce 
Creek, for which he was to pay six pounds for every acre 
he should clear and plant ; the amount to be paid on the 
Fast Day of St. Michael, the Archangel. Brought a suit 
at Dover in 1649. 

WILLIAM PALMER. 
We find William Palmer in Kittery, as early as 1642. 
He lived probably a little north of Mass Cove, otherwise 
known as Weir Creek, near Kittery Junction. His land 
was next west of Jeremiah Shires. Sixteen acres of this 
land he gave to his son-in-law, William King. 

He was Commissioner for minor trials ; and a lot-layer. 

HUBERT MATTONE. 

Hujbrect Mattone, — Hubert Mattonk, lived at Kittery 

Point, near Roger Deering, nearly opposite Fishing Island. 

Married June, 1673, Sarah Jones, daughter of John Peirce. 

They had trouble and separated. She obtained a divorce 



PISOATAQUA PIONJSRR. ADDRKSSK3. I49 

in 1681, for seven years non support; and she testified 
further that he threatened to kill her. 

She went to the Barbadoes with Jones whom Mattone 
said she knew was alive when she married him. 

In 1657, Mattone was a voter in Portsmouth and a- 
Juryman. ( 

NATHAN LORD. 

Nathan Lord came over with Abraham Cunly, and 
married his daughter Judith, Lived first at Cold Harbor 
Ferry ; then at Old Fields, in Berwick. He married 
William Everett's daughter Martha, for his second wife ; 
after her death, he married Martha Tozier. 

Just above Salmon Falls, Richard Tozier, Martha's 
father, had sixty acres of land and a farm-house ; was 
killed here by the Indians, Dec. 11, 1662. 

After the marriage of Nathan Lord with Martha Tozier, 
he lived at her father's ; his house was taken down about 
fifty years ago, and now the house of Charles Collins is 
on the site. 

In 1701, he was a member of the Committee to repair 
the Church. 

He was an ancestor of the Rev. Nathan Lord, President 
of Dartmouth College. 

In 1711. the Lord garrison served for five families, and 
twenty-five souls. 

RICHARD NASON. 

As early as 1664 the town of Kittery granted land to 
Richard Nason, adjoining Nathan Lord's acres; and to 
designate the ownership, trees were marked R and N, 
(Richard and Nathan.) 

Thirty years later, he deeded this estate to his sons, — 
Benjamin and Baker. This property went to tide-water 
on the west. A little earlier than this, 1654, he sold a 
strip to John Beex, "down along the river unto Fresh- 
Water Creek." This river strip was called Pipe Staff Point, 
supposed to be one of the oldest landmarks in Old Kittery 
mentioned in Dover records in 1639, sometimes called the 
Lower Landing. 



150. PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

His land was probably occupied before the grant ; it 
was the case with nearly all the earlier settlers. 

Below Quanipheagan Falls was a stretch of houses and 
farms ; on one of these was the Garrison House, owned by 
one Sligo. The Nason House was about opposite, and 
gave him doubtless a feeling of security. 

In 1690, Richard Nason's house was one of eight Gar- 
j risons of Kittery or upper Berwick ; and in Lower Kit- 

tery there were ten more. But the Indians were riot the 
only angered ones ; for a man's own neighbor might be a 
resolute foe, because he was willing that a Quaker should 
live in Kittery, and have a Sunday meeting for his own 
worship. It was feared that Shapleigh allowed Quakers 
to hold Sunday services in his house ; the anger of many 
was stired, aud Nicholas and James Heard and Richard 
Nason were at once dismissed from being the Selectmen of 
Kittery ; and one John Heard had a fine of forty shillings 
to pay for once having had a Quaker in his house. 
ROBERT MENDUM. 

Robert Mk.ndum lived next north of Thomas Withers, 
northwest of River Ferry. Sold to Hugh Gunnison, July 
15, 1654, two houses and a large parcel of tillage land, on 
the west side of the mouth of Spruce Creek ; also other 
lands given him by the townsmen. 

He was licensed to keep an Ordinary, in 1644. He was 
still in the business in 1650 ; for the Court records declare 
that Goody Mendum was fined ^5 for saying, "The Devil 
take Mr. Gullison and his wife ;" Mr. Gullison being the 
business rival. He had a grant of land, Dec. 1652, extend- 
ing to the head of Brave Boat Harbor- This included 
the Ashen Swamp. 

DANIEL PAUL. 

Daniel Paul was a ship builder and sea captain, from 
Ipswich, England: At one time he owned land near Boil- 
ing Rock. He probably lived not far from Charles Paul. 
A part of his estate is still owned by the Pauls. His son 
Stephen married Katherine, daughter of Antipas Maverick. 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. X51 

The Poem of Dr. Hale read at the Annual Meeting: — 

3fr %t#evto of ©osporf €oro«. 

Star Island, Isles of Shoals. 
WILLIAM HALE, M. D. 

'Twas in 1650, or thereabout, 
Bravely from Portsmouth putting out, 
That Parson Brock with good intent, 
Over the sea to Gosport went. 

Over the sea to Gosport town, 
On the Isles of Shoals to settle down 
O'er his little flock of fisher-folk 
(To harder flock divine ne'er spoke,) 

That spent their lives at the oars and sails, 
Triming their craft to meet the gales, 
Subsisting on faith and fish and fog, 
But chiefly the last, if the island log 

We may believe. But at all events, 
Full of faith and fight and common sense. 
Godly John Brock ! by Mather praised, 
As grand a soul as the Lord e'er raised 

To fight the good fight with tongue and pen, 
And preach the gospel unto men ; 
A bluff old web-footed saint was he 
To save the sailor and smooth the sea. 

His quaint old church to this day remains, 
Which one may see, so take the pains ; 
Like a crippled coot, the forlorn hulk braves, 
On the topmost ledge, the winds and waves, 

Of Spanish cedar and gnarled knees, 
Built for battling the stormy seas 
Out of the wrecks of Spanish ships, 
Lost, alas ! after venturesome trips. 

The good old man was in his prime, 
When, out 01 the salt sea's roar and rime, 



152. PISQATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 

Was tossed this tale of Gosport town, 
In the island's annals salted down. 

One morning the parson, — be his name revered, — 
By Shoaler and shoreman both loved and feared, 
Unfolded an earnest, exhaustive plan 
•Of God's salvation for sinful man. 

The high box-pulpit gave scant space 
For this gospel soldier's fighting-place ; 
It shook'and shivered profoundly when, 
Aiding, abetting voice and pen, 

The pastor, his huge fists square and brown, 
On the flimsy structure pounded down ; 
Weak and tottering as earthly throne, 
It shook when the shepherd besought his own. 

Now his was a goodly and earnest flock, 
Grandly moulded, of sturdiest stock. 
Blunt old sea-dogs, gentle or rough, 
Singing or swearing, tender or tough, 

Honest and true as the day is long. 
Free as the wind, as the tide as strong, 
A-fooling, fighting, swearing ashore, 
Eating prodigiously, drinking more. 

At sea the picture of patience, they, 
Benumbed with' frost and wet with spray, 
Toiling as only heroes toil, 
Tho' fierce the foray and scant the spoil. 

Yet, much as they honored their pastor brave, 
One failing they had, these sons of the wave, 
That failing was fishing. The call to fish 
(The world hath not wisdom that one could wish.) 

Was stronger far than the gospel call ; 

Blow high or blow low, it took them all, 

When fish were sighted, one by one 

For the boats they scrambled, each mother's son. 

'Twas the custom shrewd in that wise day, 
When mackerel were schooling in the bay, 



PISCAfTAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 153, 

To keep on Sundays, in weather fine, 
A lookout watching for fish the sign ; 

A lynx-eyed lad at the steps or door, 

From belfry : perhaps, scanning sea and shore, 

Or even up in the homely spire 

(For love of fish, not heaven, gone higher,) 

Whence he was ready, at sig^ht of game, 
With lungs that might have given Athens fame, 
The preacher's quavering voice to drown. 
And rouse to action the entire town. 

If a school of fish he chanced to spy, 
11 A school ! a school !" would be the cry ; 
When madly rushing from porch and pew, 
The frenzied flock to the water flew, 

While the parson, since he could not choose, 
Kept on preaching to empty pews, 
Breaking his bread and giving his leaven 
To a baker's dozen bound for heaven. 

Now, on the morning of which we write, 
The watchman chanced a school to sight 
Off in the bay in the range of Rye — 
Swift and clear came the warning cry, 

" A school ! a school !" when, bent on a trip, 

As cats rush from a sinking ship, 

The eager fishers rushed pell-mell 

Straight (so the parson thought) for - - weel ? 

And the angered reverend, hot and hoarse, 
In the midst of his long discourse 
Stopped at his tenthly and began 
To berate the deserters to a man. 

" Ah ! my weak, sinful friends," quoth he, 
"Do ye desert your God for the sea? 
Do ye for the sake of a meagre fare, 
To deny your Lord, like Peter dare? 



154* PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRBSSES.- 

"Ye're plucky and proud 'neath these summer skies, 

But what will ye do when the storms arise, 

And trouble and trial vex life's seas, 

And sorrows come sighing on every breeze ? 

'•• It's very well now to scoff and jeer, — 
But what will ye do when the end is near ? 
What will ye do when the mad seas flow 
And hnrl ye on to the shores of woe?" 

To which, when the parson paused for breath, 
A gruff old skipper, glum as death, 
Turned in the aisle, with rage red-hot, 
And belched in defiance his parting shot, 

Which might have been heard by the brown old Boar 
Grimly guarding the Hampton shore : 
%< I'll tell ye, parson, what I sh'd do, 
An' what's good for me's good for you." 

He shouted without quake or qualm, 
" I sh'd h'ist the fores'i an' scud for Squam ! 
There's no wind blows that a sea-dog can't, 
Somehow or 'nother, git a slant ! 

11 What's sarse for gander's sarse for'goose, 
'Taint sich a desp'rite ugly cruise 
From Appledore to Ipswich Bay, 
Specially 'f ye know the way. 

" I sh'd reef the fores'i an' let her slide, 
An' fetch Squam bar on the starboard side ; 
'Taint nigh's fur as t'other spot 
You're headin' for, nor half so hot !" 

Then with a shake of his big brown fist, 
While the frightened women screamed and hissed, 
He swiftly dashed through the open door 
An'd made for his boat upon the shore. 

To the saddened preacher grievous the shock ; 
For he died soon after, poor John Brock ! 



PISCATAQUA PIONRER. 155. 

'Twas long, long since; and the skipper, too, 
Sleeps with his hardy, godless crew. 

Skipper and parson rest side by side, 
In that graveyard lone beside the tide, 
On rugged Star, where the pimpernel 
Clings to the ledge it loves so well ; 

Where the aster and the golden rod, 
Their simple glory give to God ; 
Where the plovers pipe and the curlews call, 
And the sea's sad splendor enfolds them all. 

Skipper and parson are still acquaint, 
Peace to their ashes ! sinner and saint, 
God bless them both; and grant that they 
Fetch the self-same port on judgment-day, 



-*4$e®GH- 



PISCATAQUA PIONEERS. ADDRESSES. 
O 

Fifth. Annual Meeting, August 31, 1909, 
(see page 119J 
the remainder of the Addresses 

will be published in the next issue of 
Old Eliot. 



OLD ELIOT. 

Dr. J. L. M. WILLIS. Editor. 
VOL. IX. ELIOT, MAINE. Oct.-December, 1909. No. IV. 



QL\)2 Hiraf ^ifthmmt of Bern Hampshire. 

The Clai?ns of Odiorne 's Point and Hilton s Point, 

otherwise called Dover Point, Compared. 

By Jjhn Scales, of Doyer. 

Read at the Annual Meeting of the Piscataqua Pioneers. 

In order to give a clear understanding of where the first 
permanent settlement of New Hampshire vvas male, it 
seems best to begin with a statement of the various grants 
of the territor}' of New Hampshire, to whom and when 
made, as this matter of grants has led to much confusion 
of ideas among the historians, by which they have been 
led into making erronious statements ; several important 
facts in regard to this question are now known which were 
not known by the early writers, some of the discoveries of 
important papers being of recent date 

November 3, 1620, King James granted a Patent or 
Charter to forty persons who were incorporated as — 
" The Council established at Plymouth, in the County of 
Devon, for the planting, ruling, ordering and governing 
New England, in America ; from the 40th to the 48th 
degree of latitude, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
OceaL." Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Captain John Mason 
were important and influential members of this powerful 
company. All New Hampshire Patents and Grants were 
obtained from this Council of Plymouth; the grants were 
as follows : 

1. Mariana, to Captain John Mason, March 9, 1621-2, 
under which it is claimed that he had Ambrose Gibbons, 
as his agent, make a small settlement at Cape Ann in 
1622 or '23, and they remained there until ousted by the 



158 FI*ST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Massachusetts Bay Colony, and Mason lost all control 
there in 1630. 

2. The Province of Maine, to SirFerdinando Gorges 
and Captain John Mason, April 19, 1622. This comprised 
all the coast from the Merrimac River to the Kennebec 
River, and back into the country; a rather indefinite but 
very great distance. So far as New Hampshire was con- 
cerned, nothing was ever done under this grant. 

3. A Point of Land in thb Pascataway River, in 
New England, to David Thomson, Mr. Jobe and Mr. 
Sherwood, always since known as Thomson' s Point ; this 
grant was made in 1622 ; the exact month and day of month 
are not known, but probably in July or August, as only a 
memorandum of the patent and the year it was given has 
been found. Mr. Thomson made a settlement there, as 
will be explained farther on. 

4. Odiorne's Point and Hilton's Point, compris- 
ing a tract of six thousand acres, bordering on the south 
side of the Pascataqua River and its branches. On this 
land the first settlement was made in the spring of 1623, 
as will be explained later. The grant was made October 
16, 1622, by the Council of Plymouth, to David Thomson, 
alone. 

5. New Hampshire, to Captain John Mason, Novem- 
ber 7, 1629, which was bounded as follows : 

" All that part of the main land in New England, lying 
upon the sea coast, beginning at the middle part of the 
Merrimack River, and from thence proceed northward 
along the sea coast to the Pascataqua River, and so for- 
wards and up within the said river, and to the farthest 
head thereof, (now known as Milton Three Ponds,) and 
from thence northwestwards, until three score miles be 
finished from the first entrance of Pascataqua River,, and 
also irom (mouth of the) Merrimack through the said 
river, and to the furthest head thereof ; and so forwards 
up into the lands westward, until three score miles be fin- 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



I59« 



ished ; and from thence to cross overland to the three 
score miles, as accompted from Pascataqua River, together 
with all islands and islets within five leagues distance of 
the premises and abutting upon the same, or any part or 
parcel thereof ; etc. etc." — Captain Mason never did any- 
thing with that grant. 

6. The Laconia Grant, to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and 
Captain John Mason, November 17, 1629. The bounda- 
ries or this grant extended from the mouth of the Merri- 
mack River, along the coast to the Sagadahock (Kenne- 
bec) River, and the side lines extended north and west to 
include Lake Champlain and territory to the St. Lawrence 
River. Uuder that patent lively work was begun by 
Captain Mason to make a settlement in New Hampshire; 
he had done nothing before in this respect. He sent over 
a party in 1630, in the famous ship Warwick, of which 
Captain Walter Neal was governor, and they took posses- 
sion, of the Thomson house at Odiorne Point, began the 
settlement at Strawberry Bank, which twenty-three years 
later was named Portsmouth, and began a settlement at 
the head of the Newichawannock River, soon after, at a 
point since known as Great Works. 

About the same time, settlements began on the north 
side of the Pascataqua River at Kittery Point, but not 
until a year or two after that at Great Works. 

The Laconia company expected to make immense for- 
tunes for the individual members, but it proved to be a 
great failure, after three years' trial, and was dissolved in 
1634; Mason took the New Hampshire side of the river, 
and Gorges the Maine side, except that Mason retained 
the settlement at Great Works, (now South Berwick,) as 
he had invested quite largely there in mills and live 
stock, etc. 

Captain Mason died in 1635, and his widow left the 
settlers to shift for themselves, as she was not financially 
able to assist them further, They speedily made good by 



i5>. 



FIR$T. SKTTI<KM£NT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



gobbling up all the property they could lay hands on. 
That was the end of the Masonian work of making settle- 
ments; but a halt century later, the land owners here were 
forced to defend themselves against Masonian lawsuits, 
which were handed down from generation to generation 
for nearly a century. 

It is not easy to see wherein, or whereat, Captain J )hn 
Mason ever benefited New Hampshire. He was its foun- 
der only in the fact that he gave the name which it bears, 
from his home county iu Old England, mikiig it Ne.v 
Hampshire iu New England. Captain Mason was a f xil- 
ure as a colonizer in New Hampshire ; the settle n^nt v is 
begun seven years before he had anything to do with it. 

7. Th« Hilton- Grant, commonly called the — 
Squamscott Patent, to Edward Hilton, March 12, 
1629-30. which date is only four months after the Lac mia 
Patent was issued to Gorges and Mason, which entirelv 
covered and surrounded what Hilton had come into pos- 
session of by Divid Thompson's grant of October, 1622, 
and which he had occupied peaceably and had improved 
during the seven years, from 1623 to 1630. The Council 
of Plymouth willingly granted his request for a patent to 
more securely protect him in the holding of the property 
which he had rightfully possessed for seven years. This 
Grant will be spoken of and discussed further on. 

8. Pascataway, to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Capt. 
John Mason, November 3, 1631. The object of this patent 
was to define more definitely the territory between Gorges 
and Mason and the territory covered by Edward Hilton's 
patent ; as a dispute had already arisen among the land 
owners as to the boundary. line. In brief, the patent says : 

"All that k portion of land lying within the precincts 
hereafter mentioned, beginning upon the seacoast about 
five miles to the westward to or from the said chief habita- 
tion (at Odiorne's Point,) or plantation now possessed by 
Captain j, Walter Neal, for the use of the. adventurers to 
Laconia, (being in the latitude of 43 degrees, or there- 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. l6l, 

abouts, ) in tke Habor of Passataquack, alias Bassataquack, 
alias Passataway, and so forth, from the said beginning, 
eastward and northeastward, and so proceeding northward 
or northwestward into the Harbor and River, along the 
coast and shores thereof, including all the islands and 
islets lying within, or near unto the same, upwards unto 
the headland opposite unto the plantation, or habitation, 
now or late in the tenure or occupation of Edward Hilton, 
and from thence westwards and south westwards in the 
middle of the River, and through the middle of the Bay or 
Lake of Btquadack, alias Bassaquack, or by what other 
name or names it hath, towards the bottom or westernmost 
part of the river called Pascassockes to the falls thereof, 
and from thence by an imaginary line to pass over to the 
Sea, where the proambulation began, etc. etc." That is 
to say, it included what is now known as Portsmouth, Rye, 
Hampton, Greenland and part of Newington. 

9. New Hampshire and Masonia, to Captain John 
Mason, April 22, 1635 This patent was issued because 
the Council for New England, at its session, February 3, 
1634-5. had decided to surrender its charter to the King, 
and its territory was divided by the Council into eight 
divisions, of which No. 6 was to Captain Mason, and 
comprised the territory mentioned in his New Hampshire 
grcjnt of November 7, 1629, and which finally came to be 
defined by the present boundary lines of the State, after a 
cortention with Massachusetts for nearly two hundred 
years ; the final decision of the line was made less than a 
score of years ago. 

It may be well here to state a fact that is not generally 
known, that what is now the State of New Hampshire, 
was never so called by the people here ; nor was the name 
New Hampshire used in official and legal papers, until 
1679, fifty years after it was given to the territory by Cap- 
tain Mason, that is, Nov. 7, 1629. During the period from 
1640 to 1679 the towns here were a part of Norfolk County 
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the territory here 
was called Pascataqua; that was the name it wu known 



l62 riRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

'by, everywhere along the coast, from 1623 to 1640. It has 
been assumed by some historical writers, that "Pascata- 
qua" was applicable only to the locality about Little 
Harbor and Odiorne's Point ; but that is a mistaken idea 
of the territory covered by the word. In writing letters 

'they were dated as from " Hilton's Point, Pascataqua ;" 
or, "Strawberry Bank, Pascataqua;" or, " Pascataqua 

•in New England," when letters were sent here from 
England. 

In a statement of Robert Mason's claim for land rent 
from the Dover and Portsmouth farmers, in 1674-5, refer- 
ence is made to Captain' John Mason's various franchises, 
which have already been mentioned, and "afterwards en- 
larged," and "now called New Hampshire." The infer- 
ence is plain, that it was hot so called before then. 

The Mason heirs had been trying for years to sell land 
and collect rents from land holders, but the Massachusetts 

rcourts would not admit any such claims ; so, as a last 

•.resort, in 1679, the separate province of New Hampshire 
was established, with new Courts that Massachusetts 

.could not control, in which the law suits were tried. But 
for those lawsuits, our State today might now rejoice in 
the euphonious name, Pascataqua instead of New Hamp- 
shire. 

- Having shown that Captain John Mason had nothing 
whatever to do with the 'first settlement in New Hampshire 
I will now show that David Thomson and 1 Edward Hilton 
were the leaders "in making, the first settlements, — the one 
at Odiorne's Point, the other at Hilton's Point, now com- 
monly called Dover Point. Both came with their parties 
in the spring of 1623. Thomson remained two or three 
years, then removed to Thomson's Island, in Boston 
Harbor, where he died. Hilton remained permanently at 
Dover Point, and the settlement there has been continuous 
to the present day ; therefore I claim that the first perma- 
' ' ?ie?it settlement in New Hampshire, was made at Dover 
Point. I will give the evidence on which I base my belief. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 163* 

Who was David Thomson that he should receive 
grants of land from the Council of Plymouth? What in- 
duced him to come here to settle? Who was Edward 
Hilton, that he should come here with David Thomson ? 
Surely they could not have been ordinary men. 

._-..,■ David Thomson. 

— David Thomson was born about 1590 ; he was united in 
marriage with Amias Cole, of Plymouth, England, 13 July 
1613 ; she was the daughter of William Cole, of that town, 
"who was a ship builder. The 'wedding took place in St. 
•Andrew's church, and is on record there. :• 

; The names of his parents are not known. It is said that 
he was of Scotch descent, and that he was son of Michael 
Thomson, but there is no evidence of this. He is nowhere 
mentioned as connected with any town in Scotland; the 
inference is that he- was born in Plymouth, where he mar- 
lied his wiie and was in business a number of years pre- 
vious to coming to New England. At the time of his 
-marriage, when he was about twenty-three years old, he 
was called "an apothecary's clerk." His place of residence 
from 1613 to 1623, was at Plymouth. How long he con- 
tinued in the apothecary business is not known. As his 
father-in-law was a ship builder, he may have engaged in 
business with him ; but up to 1620, there is no record 
further than above stated, as to what he was employed in 
-doing. But. it is. quite certain he was a busy man, and 
became associated with men who were high up in official 
circles, whose records are well known. 

T,hat he was interested in shipping, and hid made 
voyages to New England and the Pascataqua River before 
-1623, is shown by his knowledge of the localities here and 
dn Boston Harbor and in Massachusetts Bay. The proof 
that he came here in the ship Jonathan, in the Spring of 
1623, will be given at the close of this sketch. He and 
his party landed at Little Harbor. The precise rock on 
which they set foot, when they landed, cannot be pointed 



i6 4 . 



F1M9T S»TTi,lS**ffT OF NEW MAMPlfil&K. 



out, as the Plymouth Rock is, on which the Pilgrims 
stepped, only two and a half years before, but, from the 
lay of the land, called Odiorne's Point, on which it is 
probable the first house was built, it is quite certain the 
landing was made in some cove on the south side of Little 
Harbor, and below the bridge that leads from Rye to the 
Wentworth Hotel, at Newington, as it was not possible 
to anchor their ship safely any further out toward the 
open bay. 

What interest did Mr. Thomson have in this New 
England colonizatiou business, that was undertaken,by 
" The Council established at Plymouth, in the County of 
Devon, (England,) for the planting, ruling, ordering and 
governing New England in America, etc. etc." Tbe 
Council was charteied November 3, 1620; it organized 
soon after, and David Thomson was elected or appointed 
" Messenger," or confidential "Agent." This is shown 
by the Records of the Council, when a hot contest was 
going on in Parliament, to take away the charter, on the 
ground that the King had exceeded his authority in grant- 
ing it. The following are excerpts from the Record : 

On the 5th of July, 1622 : " It is ordered that David 
Thomson do attend the Lords with A peiition to his 
Majesty for forfeits committed by Thomas Weston; As 
also to solicit the Lords for procuring from his Majesty a 
proclamation concerning fishermen in the western parts. 
Likewise to procure some course for punishing their (the 
fishermen's) contempt for authority /of the Council.)" 

On the 24th of July, 1622: '* Mr. Thomson is appointed 
to attend the Lords, for a warrant to Mr. Attemey-General 
for drawing the new Patent." 

On the 8th of November, 1622 : '* Mr. Thomson is or- 
dered to pay unto Leo Peddock £u\ towards his pains 
for his last employment to New England." 

On the nth of November, 1622 : V Mr. Thomson is 
appointed to attend Sir Robert Munsell concerning Cap- 
tain Squebbs' commission." 

On the 15th of November, 1622, "Mr. Thomson and 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NKW HAMPSHIRE. 



I6 5 . 



the Clerk are directed to see the ton of iron weighed to be 
sent to Mr. Whitty ;" and the same day, " Mr. Thomson 
is appointed to solicit Captain Love to pay in the ^40 for 
which Sir Samuel Argall standeth engaged," &c. 

On the 16th of November: "It is ordered that Mr. 
Thomson propoundeth to have an order from the Council 
for transportation of ten persons with provisions for New 
England. And the persons so transported to pay the 
Council the usual rate for their transportation, after ex- 
piration of two years." 

David Thomson's name ceases to appear on the Records, 
as an active agent of the Council, after December 3d, 
1622. He was then preparing his emigration party for 
New England ; the agreement with the three merchants, 
his partners, was drawn up December 14, 1622, and signed 
that day ; which agreement will be given later in this 
article. 

From these briefs from records of the Council, it is mani- 
fest that David Thomson was an active agent of the Coun- 
cil in the contest with Parliament to save their charter. 
While he was thus active, he secured for himself, a Mr. 
Jobe, and a Mr. Sherwood, a patent or grant of a Point of 
land in the Pascataqua River, in New England. The 
patent itself has not been found, but a memorandum of 
such a.grant is on record in the Public Record Office in 
London, and was copied by Mr. Charles Deane, of Boston, 
wher he was in London, and published by him in the 
New England Genealogical and Historical Register, in 
1876, as follows: "1622. A patent to David Thomson, 
M. Jobe and M. Sherwood, for a Point (of land) in Pas- 
cataqua River, in New England." 

In the earliest times of history here, the name Pascata- 
qua was applied to the river on the east side of Dover 
Point, and in that river there is a point of land, just below 
the mouth of the Cocheco River, which is called Thom- 
son's Point, and has been so called from the very earliest 
begining of records here. That is undoubtedly the Point 



1*6. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



of land which was granted to those three men. 

Their object was to use it for catching and curing 
salmon in the spring time, when that fish ran up the river 
there, in immense schools. 

The patent was obtained sometime during the summer 
of 1622. It shows that Mr. Thomson must have been 
there in some springtime before ; else he could not have 
known there was such a river, and such a point of land in 
it, which was desirable for fishing. 

It has been supposed by some writers, that the name of 
the Point was derived from William Thompson ; but that is 
an error, as the land bore that name before William 
Thompson became a resident ot Dover, and probably 
before he was born. 

DAVID THOMSON'S INDENTURE. 

On the 16th of October, 1622, the Council of Plymouth 
gave a patent, or grant, to David Thomson, alone, of 
six thousand acres of land and an island, in New England. 
The patent for this grant is not extant, but that there was 
such a patent is proven by an Indenture of David Thom- 
son's, which was found among the old papers in possession 
of the late Hon. Robert C. Winthrop. of Boston, which he 
had inherited from his ancestor, John Winthrop, the first 
Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

It had lain among the W 7 inthrop papers two hundred 
and fifty years, unknown to the historians of New Hamp- 
shire, who, in their ignorance, have published a mass of 
historical "rot," about the first settlement of this State. 

Soon after Mr. Winthrop found the Indenture, he gave 
it to the late Charles Deane, of Boston, who read it before 
the Massachusetts Historical Society, at a meeting in 
May or June, 1876 ; and" it was published in the annual of 
the Society for that year. 

In presenting it to the meeting, Mr. Deane first gave a 
summary of its contents, as follows, which is all that is 
necessary to give in this paper : 

The Indenture recites that the Council for New England 



FtRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. . 167. 

had granted to David Thomson, alone, under date of 
16th of October, 1622 : 

Six thousand acres of land and one island, in New 
England, but did not locate it ; that Thomson had abso- 
lutely conveyed one fourth part of the island to three mer- 
chants of Plymouth, viz. Abraham Colmer, Nicholas 
Sherwill and Leonard Pomery, with covenants to convey, 
in fee simple, the fourth part of six thousand acres. In 
consideration whereof it is agreed between the parties, in 
brief, as follows : 

First. That the merchants, Colmer, Sherwill and 
Pomery, will at their own charge, '"this present year, 1622," 
provide and send two men with Thomson, in the ship 
44 Jonathan, of Plymouth," to New England, with victuals 
provisions, etc as shall suffice them till they are landed. 
And if they land there within the space of three months 
after the ship shall pass Ram Head, (a promontory just 
outside of Plymouth Sound,) the residue of the three 
month's victuals shall be delivered to Thomson, at his 
landing, there to be disposed of by him towards finding a 
fit place for intended habitation, and also to begin the 
same. 

Second The three merchants will, this present year, 
1622, at their own charge, provide and send three men 
more in the ship "Providence of Plymouth," which ship 
was owned by Pomery, if they may be as soon gotten, or 
in some other ship w 7 ith the first expedition that may be to 
New 7 England ; the charges of these three Jien to be borne 
equally by all the parties. 

Third. Two men more are to be sent this present year, 
(1622,) in the "Jonathan of Plymouth," the charges of 
them to be borne by all the parties equally. 

FoukTH. As soon as Thomson and the seven men are 
landed in New England, Thomson shall, as soon as con- 
venient, find out a fit place to make choice of six thousand 
acres of land, and a fit place to settle and erect some 
houses, or buildings for habitations, and to begin fc ~w 



168. 



FISLST S«TT1,KMKNT OF NB?W HAMFSKIRK, 



erection of the same. Adjoining these buildings there 
shall be allotted before the end of five years, six hundred 
acres of land, which, with all the buildings and everything 
appertaining to them, shall, at the end of five years, be 
divided equally between all parties ; and all the charges 
for building, planting, husbanding, &c, during that time 
shall be equally borne by all. The residue of the six thous- 
and acres to be also divided in a convenient time, between 
the parties in four parts, whereof Thomson is to have 
three fourths, and the other three men one fourth. 

Fifth. At the end of five years the island shall be 
divided into four parts, whereof Thomson was to have 
thtee fourths, and the others one fourth. 

Sixth. Three fourths of the charge for planting, 
husbanding and building on the said island, shall be 
borne by Thomson, and one fourth by his partners. 

Seventh. AlT profits during the five years that may 
be derived from the six thousand acres, and by fishing 
and trading, &c. shall be divided equally ; the merchants, 
however, were to have liberty to employ ships to fish at 
their own charge, if Thomson dots not care to participate 
in the profits of such extra ships. 

Eighth. All benefits and profits arising during the 
five years, on'the residue of the six thousand acres, and on 
the island, shall be divided among the four men, Thomson 
to have three parts, and the others oue part. Each of 
them shall, on request, deliver a just account of their 
receipts and payments during the five years. 

The above is a summary of the Indenture, which was 
signed on the 14th of December, 1622, by Thomson, Col- 
mer, Sherwill and Pomery, and under which the first 
settlement of New Hampshire was made. As they then 
reckoned time, the year 1622 did not end until the 24th of 
March ; so they had ample time to load the ship "Jona- 
than of Plymouth," and get over here before the end of 
the year, 1622, which was the agreement they would do, 
and probably did do ; any way they arrived in the early 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. ^ 169. 

spring of 1623, as we now reckon the year, as beginning 
in January. 

As regards the location of the six thousand acres: — 
According to the indenture, Mr. Thomson was authorized 
to make his own selection, anywhere he pleased in New 
England. The location of the island was not mentioned ; 
but a lawsuit, a quarter of a century later, made it certain 
it was an island in Boston Harbor, ever since called 
Thomson Island. 

According to the terms of the grant, he was not obliged 
to locate his six thousand acres all in one compact body. 
It is quite evident he did not take it-all in a lump. Ports- 
mouth, as now bounded, has 9000 acres ; so it appears his 
grant was two thirds the size of that city. It was all that 
he and his partners needed for carrying on their fishing 
and Indian fur trade business. Please keep in mind, also, 
that Sir Ferdindo Gorges. Captain John Mason, and the 
Earl of Warwick, had nothing whatever to do with this 
grant of land ; Mr. Thomson's partners were the three 
reputable merchants of Plymouth, whose names have 
already been given. 

Those four men having signed the Indenture on the 
14th ot December. 1622, proceeded at once to prepare to 
set sail in the 'Jonathan of Pl> mouth." The company 
started on the voyage across the Atlantic on some day that 
winter. — the exact date is not known; neither is the day 
of their landing at Little Harbor known, but it was in the 
spring of 1623 ; no doubt about that. 

If Mr. Thomson had been as gifted in the use of the 
pen, as he evidently was in managing business, he might 
have left us as interesting a stor> as Governor Bradford 
wrote for Plymouth ; unfortunately he left no record of 
what was done, or when important events took place. He 
was a young man of twenty-eight or thirty years of age 
then. If he left no records, how then do we know that he 
really came in 1622 ? We know by the written records of 
other men. Look at the evidence : 

William Hubbard, the Historian of New England, who 
wrote at a period about as distant from March, 1623, a a we 



170. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



are now from the date of the firing of the first gun on Fort 
Sumter, which opened the Civil War, says that Thomson 
and his company landed at Little Harbor in 1623. There 
can be no doubt he knew whereof he wrote. 

Captain Christopher Leavitt, a famous sea Captain, 
traveller, discoverer, colonizer and historian, left an inter- 
esting account, which has been published, of a voyage he 
made to the New England coast in the summer and fall of 
1623 ; he visited the Isles of Shoals, which he describes 
very accurately, and in November of that year visited Mr 
Thomson and his company at Little Harbor. He calls it 
" Pannaway," but he is the only writer who has ever so 
called it ; why he used the name has never been explained; 
Capt. Leavitt says : 

ci The next place I came to was Pannaway, where one 
Mr. Thomson hath made a plantation. Therel staid 
about a month, in which time I sent for my men in the 
East, (at Agamenticusaud Saco,) who came over in divers 
ships. At this place I met with the Governor, (of New 
England, Robert Gorges,) who came thither, (from Ports- 
mouth,) in a bark which he had (confiscated) from Mr. 
Weston about twenty days before I arrived at the land. 
(Weston had disregarded the orders of the Council of 
Plymouth.") 

" The Governor then told me that I was joined with 
him in commission as Counsellor, which being read I 
fc una it was so ; and he then in the presence <~>f three more 
of the Council, administered unto me an oath " 

'* In the time I staid with Mr. Thomson, I surveyed as 
much as possible I could, the weather being unseasonable 
and very much snow on the ground." 

11 In those parts I saw much good timber ; but the 
ground seemed to me not to be good, being very rocky 
and full of trees and bush wood." 

" There is a great store of fowl of divers sorts, whereof 
I fed very plentifully. About two miles further to the 
East, (Fort Constitution,) I found a great river and a 
good harbor, called Pascataway. But for the ground I 
can say nothing, but by the relation of the Sagamore or 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



171 



King of that place, who told me there was much good 
ground along the river, about seven or eight leagues 
above (Dover Point.)" 

Governor Bradford in his History of Plymouth, under 
date of 1623, says : "There were also this year some scat- 
tering beginnings made in other places, as at Pascaiaway, 
by David Thomson > at Monhegan, and some other places, 
by sundry others." 

Thomas Weston, the London merchant who had plan- 
ned to finance the expense of sending over the Mayflower 
and its emigrants, but who bicked out of the agreement 
just as the Pilgrims were on the point of sailing for Mew 
England, and left them in great financial straights, was 
again heard from in the summer of 1622 : 

He sent over emigrants in two ships, the Charity and 
the Swan, whu first landed at Plymouth. There were 
sixty of these colonists, most of them hard characters. 
After remaining at Plymouth a short time, they commenced 
a settlement at Weymouth, eighteen miles north of 
Plymouth Weston himself came over in 1623, with the 
Maine coast fishing fleet, which he left in the neighbor- 
hood of Monhegan, taking two men and a small trading 
stock in a shallop, and sailed for Weymouth. 

They sailed along all right, until off Rye or Hampton 
Beach, where a storm capsized the boat, and they barely 
escaped to the shore alive. 

When W 7 eston and the two men gathered themselves up 
on dry land, with what of their boatload had washed 
ashore, they were attacked by indians, who were short of 
guns and clothing ; they took the guns and all the clothes 
the three men had on, and left them. Weston and the 
men, in their naked condition, tramped back along the 
shore, to where they had called on David Thomson, a 
short time before, in sailing along the coast. 

Fortunately for Weston, it was warm summer weather; 
so they did not suffer, except for sore feet. Governor 
Bradford says in his history: "He (Weston) got to 
Pascataquack and borrowed a suit of clothes, and got 
means somehow to come to Plymouth." 



172. FIRST SETTER M AIN'T OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

It is not recorded what became of the' other two poor 
men ; probably they staid with Mr. Thomson, and worked 
for their board and clothes, helping him finish his new 
house on Odiorne Point. 

Perhaps the following may explain how Weston sailed 
from Pascataquack to Plymouth; it may have been th it 
Captain Myles Standish took him along : 

Winslow's book, " Good News of New England," 
published in 1624, in describing events of the summer of 
1623, says : " At the same time, Capt. Standish, being 
formerly employed by the Governor to buy provisions for 
the refurnishing of the colony (at Plymouth,) returned 
with the same, accompanied with Mr. David Thomson, a 
Scotchman, who also that spring began a plantation twenty- 
five leagues northeast from us, near Smith's Isles, at a 
place called Pascataquack, where he liketh well." 

Phineas Pratt, .whose manuscript narative was not pub- 
lished until 185S, says he visited David Thomson, at 
Pascataway, in the year 1623. 

What greater proof would be asked, that David Thom- 
son began his settlement at Little Harbor, in the spring of 
1623, than has been given by the witnesses above quoted ? 

The year and the season is beyond question. It was in 
the spring of 1622, O. S.; or, 1623. N. S., — as we now 
reckon years. 

How Long did he Reside at Little Harbor ? 

The Historian Hubbard, says, Mr. Thompson aban- 
doned Little Harbor the next year, 1624, " Out of dislike 
to the place or his employers." 

On the other hand, Bradford's History of Plymouth 
says : he was residing at "Pasketeway," in 1626 ; as in the 
spring or summer of that year, he joined with the Governor 
of Plymouth and Mr. Winslow, in purchasing goods at 
Monhegan, where the owners broke up their establishment 
and sold out to the highest bidder. 

When Thomson and the Plymouth party down there, 
and the Monhegan fellows saw there were competing 
bidders for their stock in trade, they put up the price ; 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 173. 

then Winslow and Thomson stopped bidding and withdrew 
for consultation ; the result was they agreed to purchase 
the whole lot, jointly ; which they did, and then divided 
the goods according as each had means to pay Among 
the lot were some fine animals, — goats and hogs ; some of 
these Mr Thomson took, as a part of his share, and 
carried them to his island, in what is now Boston Harbor, 
where he established a flourishing business in raising 
swine and goats for trade with the settlers along the coast. 
As regards Pascataqua and Little Harbor. I have not 
betn able to find any reference that would show that Mr. 
Thomson resided there after the summer of 1626. The 
inference is that he had shut up his house, and was con- 
fining his work to his flourishing establishment on Thom- 
son's Island Thtre is no record, or hint of a record, that 
any one resided at Udiornc's Point after Thomson left 
there, in 1626, until Captain Walter Neal took possession 
of the house, by order of Captain John Mason, in June, 
1630, on the arrival of the bark Warwick, with the com- 
pany that Captain Mason sent over, and who began the 
settlement at Strawberry Bank, which in 1653 became 
Portsmouth Not a i.amc of a sir.gle human being, ex- 
cept Thomson, has been found who was a permanent resi- 
dent at Odiorne's Point, or Straw berry Bank, previous to 
1630- Thompson left there in 1626; and his fishermen 
and other "hired men" engaged in more profitable em- 
ployment somewhere else. It seems evident that Thorn- 
sou, Coll mer, Sherwill and Pomery did not find it a pay- 
ing investment at Little Harbor, so gave it up, and shut 
up the house. 

What about Thomson's Island ? 

How do we know that the island mentioned in the 
Indenture, is Thomson's Island in Boston Harbor? 

The Indenture simply says, 6000 acres and an island. 
Well, that might mean Newcastle Island, just across 
Little Harbor from Odiorne's Point. Why didn't he select 
that, instead of the fertile land in Massachusetts Bay ? 
The reason is obvious to any one who has seen both 



174- FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

islands ; the one must have seemed to Mr. Thomson's 
eyes to be nothing but ledges and rocks, with here and 
there thin patches of earth ; the other was almost free 
from rocks, and presented an inviting appearance,— ju»t 
the place to raise hogs and goats. 

How do we know that David Thomson lived on Thom- 
son's Island f We have the evidence of men who were his 
contemporaries, and knew him well. 

David and Amias (Cole) Thomson had a son, John 
Thomson, who was born, probably, in 1625 or '26, at 
Odiorn's Point ; hence was the first white child ,b>rn in 
New Hampshire. David Thomson died in 1628, leaving 
a widow and an infant son. Later the widow married 
Samuel Maverick, who was the owner of and first resident 
on what is now East Boston. In 1630 the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony commenced its settlement at Boston Time 
w r ent on, and other settlements of towns around there were 
begun, receiving their grants of land from the Colony 
officials. 

In 1635, not knowing David Thomson ever had a grant 
of the island, the officials of the Bay Colony granted it to 
the town of Dorchester, which town held it a dozen years, 
unquestioned ; then, in 1647 or '48, John Thomson son of 
David, who had just become of age, entered his claim for 
ownership of the island, as sole heir of his father, David 
Thomson, who had died in 1628, on that isiand ; and he 
petitioned to have it taken from the town of Dorchester, 
and have it restored to him, the rightful owner. 

Shurtleff's History of Boston, gives fall particulars of 
the lawsuit that followed, ending in restoring it to John 
Thomson. In court, in 1648, he said his father began to 
occupy the island "in or about the year 1626." 

In course of the trial, there were among the witnesses. 
Captain Myles Standish and William Trevore, a sailor 
who came over in the Mayflower, in 1620, and visited 
Boston Harbor in 1621 ; and while there took possession of 
this island, under the name of the Island of Trevore, for 
Mr. David Thompson, then of London ; he also testified 
that Mr. Thomson obtained a grant of the island iroui the 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 175. 

Council of Plymouth some years before the Massachusetts" 
Bay Colony had its grant. 

Captain Standish testified that he knew Mr. Thomson, 
as a resident of the island. Mr William Blaxton, who 
was a resident on the peninsula of Boston some years 
before the Massachusetts Bay Company settled there in 
1630, testified that he knew Mr. Thomson well, as a resi- 
dent on Thomson's Island, where he was prosperously 
engaged in raising hogs and goats for trade with the 
Colonists. 

There was much other testimony which convinced the 
authorities and the Court that John Thomson's claim was 
just and legal ; and accordingly the island was restored to 
him, much to the grief and vexation of the town ui 
Dorchester. 

The Court descision, therefore, settles beyond question 
that David Thomson was a permanent resident of Thom- 
son's Island from 1626 until his death in 1628. It appears 
from the testimony of Trevore, that he was the person who 
informed Mr. Thomson about that island, and that Thom- 
son the very next year obtained.a patent for it, 16th of 
October, 1622. 

What about Mason Hall ? 

In all the histories the story is repeated that David 
Thomson built a house on what is now called Odiorne's 
Point ; that it was a spacious and elegant house, built in 
the style of the great mansions in England, in which the 
Lords of great manors then resided, and in which their 
descendants reside fo this day. How beautiful and grand 
it seems as you picture it in your mind's eye ! The his- 
torians not only say it was a grand mansion, but also that 
he called it Mason Hall. 

Well, what about it? There nevtr was any "Mason 
Hall." In the first place if Mr Thomson had built such 
a fine house, there was not the slightest reason why he 
should name it (or Capt. John Mason, who never invested 
a penny in sending over emigrants, and had no interest 
whatever in Thomson's grant of land. Moreover i.. 



176. FIRST SRTTI*EMJ5J*T OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Thomson had no time, material or workmen, such as 
would be absolutely needed for the construction of such an 
edifice. For example, it is stated as a fact that it took an 
expert carpenter a year to do the carving and finishing 
of the Council Chamber in the Governor Wentworth 
house, at Little Harbor, which was not built till more 
than a century after David Thomson built the first house 
at Odiorne Point, just across. the Little Harbor from the 
Governor's house. 

Consider the situation of things when Mr. Thomson 
anchored his good ship, Jonathan of Plymouth, in a south- 
west cove ot Little Harbor, in the spring of 1623. The 
beautiful plateau of Odiorne's Point was covered with a 
heavy growth of pines, probably, all the land around was 
a forest untouched with axe since the forest primeval first 
sprouted, as the glaciers of the ice age receded and ex- 
posed the earth to sunshine. 

Evidently the first work the men did was to clear the 
land of the forest ; they had axes and strong muscles, btit 
no saw-mill to cut up lumber, of which there was more 
than enough. 

Mr. Thomson had his men convert those huge trees into 
a large log house in the quickest time possible; it was 
capacious and substantial, but there could not have been 
very ornamental work. The chimney was built of stone, 
at the north end of the house, and the mortar was tough 
clay, from a clay bank near by. Tho foundation stones of 
that chimney can be seen today ; and were seen by the 
Pascataqua •Pioneers, when they visited the spot. August 
thirty-one, 1909. No doubt they had the house completed 
before Capt. Leavett and Governor Robert Mason and the 
Councillors paid Mr. Thomson a visit, in November, 1623, 
when he entertained them a month, as Capt. Leavett says. 

It is fortunate that we have a description of one of these 
plantation houses, which was built near Cape Elisabeth, 
by John Winter, ten years later, who was the agent of 
Robert Trelawney, Mayor of Plymouth and the proprietor 
of the plantation there. Mr. Winter gave Mr. Trelawney 
the following description of the house ; my opinion is 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE 



177- 



that Mr. Thomson's "house was of the same style. Mr. 
Winter says : — 

"Now for our buildings and planting, I have built a 
house here at Richmond Island that is 40 feet in length, 
and 18 foot broad, within the sides, besides the chimney; 
and the chimney is large, with an oven in e ach end ot him 
And he is so that we can place a kettle within the mantle 
piece. We can brew and bake and boil our kettle within 
him, all at once within him, with the help of another 
house that I have built under the side of our house, where 
we set pur sieves and mill and mortar in t to break our 
corn and malt, and to dress our meal in ." 

" I have two chambers iu him, and all our men lies in 
one of them. Every man hath his close boarded cabin, 
(bunks like a ship, one above another,) and I have room 
enough to make a dozen close boarded cabins more, if I 
have need of them ; and in the other chamber I have room 
to put the ship sails into, and allow dry goods which is in 
casks ; and I have a store huuse in him that will hold 18 
or 20 tuns of casks underneath. Also underneath I have 
a kitchen for our men to set and drink in . and a stewards 
room that will hold two tuns of casks, which we put our 
bread and beer into. And every one ot these rooms is 
closed with locks and keys unto them." 

Enough see ns to have been said of Oiiorne's Point, 
Mason Hall, and the career of that grand pioneer, David 
Thomson, of whom Thomas Morton, the historian and 
a personal frieni says he was "a Scotch gentleman, who 
was conversant with those people (the Indians ;) a scholar 
and a traveller that was diligent in taking notice of these 
things, and a man of good judgment." It should be borne 
in mind that Mr. Thomson was a young man, not 35 years 
old when he died. 

Hilton's or Dover Point. 

Having shown when and how the settlement at Odiorue's 
Point was begun, and how lci.g the settlers remained there, 
I will now consider the question of how and when the 
settlement ..-i ~-«a~ at Hilton's or Dover Point : — 



i 7 8. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



The settlement was begun in the spring of 1623, by 
Edward Hilton and his party, and the occupation has 
been continuous to the present day ; some of the descend- 
ants of the very first party being now residents on Dover 
Neck, a mile or two above the Point ; so that is the locali- 
ty where the first permanent settlement was begun in New 
Hampshire. 

Who was Edward Hilton ? He was a native of Loudon, 
England ; born of good parents, with a worthy ancestry ; 
he was well educated ; he was admitted to membership in 
the Fishmongers Guild, in London, in 1621, when he was 
about twenty-five years old. That society was very ex- 
clusive in selecting its membership ; none but owners of 
fishing vessels and wealthy bosses in the fishing business 
were admitted. Mr. Hilton's admission to the Guild, is 
evidence that he was a young man of high standing in 
that city. What his relations were with David Thomson 
are not recorded, but he came to Pasoataqua in the ship — 
Providence of Plymouth , which was sent over by the three 
merchants, partners of Thomson,— Abraham Colmer, 
Nicholas Sherwill and Leonard Pomery, — a few weeks 
after the Jonathan of Plymouth sailed with David Thom- 
son's company. Mr. Pomery was owner of the Providence , 
and probabiy came over in the ship on that voyage. 

When they arrived at the mouth of the Pascataqua, 
they must have had previous knowledge that Thomson 
had landed there, or intended to do so, otherwise they 
would not'have known where to make harbor Of course 
they called on him, and then came up the river to that 
beautiful point of land on which they staked out the settle- 
ment, and built their first house, which it is reasonable to 
suppose was of logs, and in the same style as that at 
Odiorne'b Point. Perhaps Mr. Thomson may have got his 
house built first ; we don't know, — L but we do know they 
were both built in the year 1623, and there Edward 
Hilton had his abode for ten years, wheu he sold out to 
Captain Thomas Wiggin's company, which came over and 
began the settlement on Dover Neck, in 1633. 

Where is Hilton's Point? The distance from the Odi- 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 179. 

orne's Point landing place, in Little Harbor, coming up 
the west side of Newcastle, to Hilton's (Dover) Point, is 
six or seven miles The " Point" lies between the Pascat- 
aqua and Back Rivtr on the south and west, Fore River, 
(otherwise Newishawannock) on the east. In coming 
up the Pascataqua, it looks as though it was straight 
down on the east side of Dover Neck ; David Thomson 
and tht first voyagers so regarded and so called it, hence 
Thomson's grant of "a point of land in the Pascataqua 
River" was on the supposition that the water Dover set- 
tlers have always called " Fore River," was a continuation 
of the Pascataqua. 

The Pcint is about a half mile long and a quarter of a 
mile wide, and is perfectly level, and in its highest place 
perhaps fift> feet above high water mark The soil is 
excellent. The situation is one of the most beautiful in 
the State. 

There is where Edward Hilton and his party settled — 
He was a shrewd business man, as well as a gentleman ; 
he was not an ordinar> fisherman He saw and apprecia- 
ted the advantages of that locality for the purposes for 
which he came over here ; that is for fishing, planting and 
trading with the Indians. 

At various seasons of the year; the waters there, on all 
sides, were abounding in excellent fish ; it was but a short 
distance to the Isles of Shoals, then a most excellent local- 
ity for deep sea fishing ; the soil all about his houses was 
excellent for raising indian corn, which the Indians soon 
taught him how to cultivate ; also for beans and other 
garden products. Two or three miles above there, he 
could get all the oysters they could possibly use ; and the 
clams in Back River w T ere so abundant that they fed their 
hogs on them. Lobsters, wild ducks, and wild fowl of all 
kinds were abundant in Little Bay and Great Bay, so that 
they never lacked for food. As Elder Brewster said of 
the Plymouth colonists that year, " they were permitted 
to suck the abundance of the seas and of the treasures hid 
in the sands. 

By the way, — the Indians never, at any time, troubled 



l3:>. FIRST SRrTt,EMi$NT OF NKW HAMPSHIRE. 

the settlers on Dover Point or Dover Neck ; not even 
during the fiercest Indian wars. Hilton's Point was a 
most excellent place for meeting and trading with the 
Indians, for the beaver skins and other Indian products of 
the forests; and Hilton and his men must have found that 
branch of their business as profitable as fishing; perhaps 
more so. That very year, 1623. while Captain Myles 
Standish and his soldiers were fighting the Indians, hand 
to hand at Weymouth, all was peace on the Pascataqua, 
and it continued so all through the troubles at Plymouth. 

Mr. Hilton resided there ten years ; then, having sold 
out his Interests to Captain Wiggin's company, which 
came over in 1633, soon after removed to what is now 
Newfields, then in the town of Exeter, where he resided 
until his death in 1671. His remains and those of eight 
generations of his descendants are interred in the ancient 
burial ground, not far from the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road station at Rockingham Junction. 

When Wheelwright and his party came to Exeter in 
1638, they settled at the Falls, and they found Hilton three 
or four miles below, where he possessed a large tract of 
land; and as the years went by, he built a spacious resi- 
. dence after the Old English style. He was not a Puritan; 
probably that was one reason why he left Hilton's Point 
when the Puritan settlers came there with Captain Wig- 
gin. Mr. Hilton was attached in a quiet way to the Eng- 
lish Church, as is manifest in a petition to the King which 
he signed 18 July, 1665, praying that he might be permit- 
ted to "enjoy the Sacraments of the English Church," 
which he had long been deprived of. 

When Exeter became settled, Mr. Hilton was one of the 
leading men until his death. He was elected one of the 
Selectmen in 1645, au d in many years after that. In the 
early history of Exeter his name appears frequently, and 
he was repeatedly chosen by the inhabitants on important 
committees to look after their interests. 

May 3, 1642, he was appointed by the authorities in 
Boston, a magistrate, to hold courts at Dover, for that 
town and for Exeter ; those towns having come under 



FTRST SSTTLEIVfS^r IS NEW HAMPSHIRE. l8r. 



Massachusetts rule in October, 1641. Judge Hilton held 
the office for several vears Such was the man who es- 
tablished tie first f>er,n2neat Settle me at in New Hampshire. 

William Hilton. 

William Hilton, brother of Edward, was one of the party 
that settled at Hilton's Point, in 1623. What of him? He 
was five years older than Edvvard he was admitted to 
membership in the Fishmongers' Guild, in London, in 
1616, and "was an active member until he came to Ply- 
mouth, New England, arriving November 11.1621. in the 
ship Fortune, He returned in the autumn of 1622, and 
came over with his brotht-r Edward to Pascataqua, in 
1623. His wife and two children came over to Plymouth 
in the ship Ann, in the summer of 1623, and in August of 
that year came from Plymouth to Hilton's Point, and 
resided there as long as his brother did. engaged in busi- 
ness with him. He was Deputy to the Massachusetts 
General Court, in 1644, and probably in other years. 

After Exeter was settled he had grants of land there. 
He also had grants of land in Dover He had a cornfield, 
in what is now Eliot, directly across the river from Dover 
Point. Probably it was an old Indian cornfield, which 
the Indians had used during an unknown period before 
the Hilton's settled on the Point, Later he built a house 
and resided there, until he was driven off by Capt. Walter 
Neal, governor of Capt. John Mason's settlement at 
Strawberry Bank, who claimed that the land belonged to 
Mason, under the Laconia ^rant. 

Capt. Neal very summarily destroyed Hilton's house, 
and granted the land to Capt* Thomas Sammock, June 2, 
1633; he designates the grant, as — "Where William 
Hilton- lately planted corne." 

Hilton brought a suit against Mason to recover it ; and » 
it was twenty years before the case was decided. It was 
October 25, 1653, that judgment was given, in his favor, 
against Mrs. Ann Mason, executrix of Capt. John Mason, 
and she had to pay him one hundred and sixty pounds, 
instead of restoring the land which had been occupied by- 
some one during the twenty years. It was his land and 



IS2. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



his house that Capt. Neal dispossessed hitn of ; the Court 
so decided, and that, of course, by right of the David 
Thomson, six thousand acres patent. No doubt he began 
planting corn there soon after the settlement was begun 
on Hilton's Poiut, as it was an old Indian cornfield, ail 
ready to be worked. 

He was assistant justice at Dover in 1642. Later he 
removed to Kittery Point, where, October 27, 1648, he was 
licensed to keep a public house at Warehouse Point, near 
Phyllis' Notch. He had ferry boats which ran to various 
points on the Great Island and Strawberry Bank side of 
the river. 

In 1650, Mr. Hilton removed to York, where he aras one 
of the signers that made that town comt under the rule of 
Massachusetts, 22 November, 1652, and took the oath of 
freeman ; there were fifty signers. He was one of the 
Selectmen of York in 1652, '53, '54. He owned the Ferry 
across York river. He died there in 1655 or '56, as letters 
of administration, are dated, 30 June, 1656, to his son-in- 
law, Richard White. 

Thomas Roberts. 

Another man who came over with Edward Hilton in 
1623, was Thomas Roberts, who has lineal descendants, 
in the name, residing on Dover Neck today, on the very 
land that he owned two hundred and seventy-five years 
ago. He was made President of the Court in March or 
April, 1640, hence Governor of the Colony at Dover, suc- 
ceeding Capt. John Underhill, which office he held until 
Dover and all the New Hampshire settlements were united 
with Massachusetts in October, 1641. The correct locality 
of his first residence on Dover Point is not known, but it 
is probable it was very near that of Edward Hilton, the 
site of which is where the present Dover Point House 
stands, —at the extremity of the Point. 

After Captain Thomas Wiggin's company came here in 
1633, having bought Edward Hilton's land, Mr. Roberts 
moved further up, on the Neck, and located himself on 
the bank of Fore River, where the spot on which he built 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



I8 3 . 



his house is still identified and pointed out by his descend- 
ants, who reside on the land, which has been preserved in 
the Roberts family, in uninterrupted succession for two- 
hundred and seventy-five years. 

In his old age he favored the Quakers, and reprimanded 
his son Thomas, and John Roberts, who were Constables 
when the Quaker women were whipped by order of the 
Court. 

He died the 27th of September, 1673, about two years 
after Edward Hilton died. They were about the same age. 

Leonard Pomery. 

Leonard Pomery, one of the three merchants who signed 
the Thomson Indenture, and was a partner in the six 
thousand acres venture, owned the ship Providence, in 
which Edward Hilton came over; Mr. Pomery probably, 
came with him, to inspect the investment he had'entered 
into with David Thomson, Abraham Colmer and Nicholas 
Sherwell. Mr. Pomery was not a permanent resident at 
Hilton's Point, as were the Hilton's and Mr. Roberts, but 
he was there on various occasions between 1623 and 1628, 
so much that he impressed his name on the cove that is 
between Dover Point and Dover Neck, on the east side. 
That cove has, from the very first, been called Pomery's 
Cove; and is so called today. That cove is where the 
Dover and Portsmouth railroad crosses the tip-end of it. 
There was where the Providence landed when it brought 
Edward Hilton and his party up' the Par.cataqua, in the 
Spring of 1.623. 

There was some special reason for calling it Pomery 
Cove ; it would not have been so named, had he not been 
there repeatedly. No other Pomery was ever in any way 
connected with the history of Dover. 

Other families were undoubtedly added to this colony 
between 1623 and 1631 ; but their names cannot be given. 

Now what are the proofs of all this ? How do I know 
they came here in 1623 ? 



i3*. 



FIRST SRTTI,BMJSrCT OF N«W HAMPSHIRE. 



Evidence of the Settlement in 1623, and that 
they Remained at Hilton's Point. 

What is the evidence that the Hiltons and Roberts and oth- 
ers, commenced the settlement at Hilton'sJPoint in 1623? 

First. The historian Hubbard says so in his History 
of New England which was published about fifty years 
after that day, but was in manuscript much earlier than 
that; he was, probably, personally acquainted vtth 
Edward and William Hilton, and conversed with them on 
the subject; Edward Hilton did not die until 167 1, and 
lived at Exeter thirty years ; and it would seem strange if 
he did not interview Mr. Hilton when he was collecting 
the material for his history; he says in his history: 

'..' For being encouraged by the report of divers mariners 
that came to mike fishing voyages upon the coast, they 
sent over that year (1623,) one Mr. David Thomson, with 
Mr. Edward Hilton and his brother William Hilton, who 
had been fishmongers in London, with some others that 
came along with them, furnished with necessaries for 
carrying on a plantation there. Possibly others might be 
sent after them in the years following, 1624. and 1625 ; 
some of whom first in probability siezed on a place called 
the Little Harbor, on the west side of the Pascataqua 
River, toward or at the mouth thereof ; the Hiltons mean- 
while setting up their stages higher up the river, towards 
the northwest, at or about a place Jsince called Dover," 

Belknap, and other historians following, repeat the 
statement above quoted from Hubbard. 

Second. William Hilton says they came to Hilton's 
Point in 1623. The New England Historical" and Gen- 
ealogical Register, of '1882. Vol. 36, has the following 
petition, which had but recently been found in the old 
Court Records, and no historian had ever known there was 
such a "document; it settles the question of date, as 1623, 
beyond a doubt : — 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE- 185. 

Petition of William Hilton, 1660. 

To the Honored Generall Court now assembled at Bos- 
ton. The Petition of William Hilton Humbly showeth : 

Whereas your petitioner's father, William Hilton, came 
over into New England about the year Anno: Dom : 1621: 
& yr petitioner came about one year and a half after, and 
in a little tyme following settled ourselves upon yr River 
of Paschataq with Mr. Edward Hilton, who were the first 
English Planters there, William having much intercourse 
with the Iudians by way of trayde and mutuail giving & 
receiving, amongst whom one Tahanto, Sagamore of Pen- 
acooke, for divers kindnesses received from your petition- 
ers father & himself, did freely give unto ye aforesaid 
William Senior and William Hilton, junior, Six Miles of 
land lying on ye River Penneconaquigg, being a riverlette 
running into Penacooke to ye eastward, ye said land to be 
bounded soe as may be most for ye best accomodation of 
your Slid petitioner, his heyres & assignes The said 
Tahants did also freely give to ye said father &'son & to 
their heyres forever! Two Miles of ye best Meddow Land 
lying on ye North East Side of ye River Pennecooke, 
adjoyning to ye said River, with all ye appertenances 
which said Tract of Land & Meddow vvert given in ye 
presence of Fejld & severall Indians. In ye >ear 1636 : 
At which tyme Tahanto went with ye aforesaid Hiltons to 
the Lands, and thereof gave them possession. All of wch 
commonly is known to ye Ancient Inhabitants af Paschatq; 
& for the further confirmation of yt sd gyft or gram Your 
petitioner hath renewed deeds from ye sd Tahanto. & since 
your petitioner understands that there be many grants of 
land lately given, thereabouts, to bee layd out: And least 
any should bee mistaken in Chusine yr place & thereby in- 
trench apon yr petitioners rights, for preventing whereof : 

Your Petitioner humbly Craveth that his grant may be 
confirmed by this Court, & that A — B — C — , or any two 
of them, may be fully Impowered to sett forth ye bounds 
of all ye above mentioned lands, & make true returne 
whereof unto this honored Court. And >our petitioner, as 



186. FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

in duty hee is bound, shall pray for your future welfare & 
prosperity. 

Boston, June i, 1660. The Committee having consid- 
ered ye contents of this petition, do not judge meet that ye 
Court gratitye same, but having considered the petitioner's 
ground for ye approbaccon of ye Indian's grant, doe judge 
meet that 300 accrs of ye sd Land be sett out to ye peti- 
tioner by a Committee Chosen by this Court, so as that it 
may not prejudice any plantation, and this as a finall end 
& issue of all future claims by virtue of such grant from 
ye Indians. 

Thomas Danforth 

ELEA IyUSHER. 

Henry Bartholomew. 
The Magists Approave of this returne if theire ye 
Depu'ts Consent hereunto. 

Edward Rawson, Secretary. 
Consented to by ye Deputies. William Torry, Cleris. 
[Endorsed.] Tae Petition of William Hilton Entered with 
ye Magistrates 30 M iy, 1660, & ex. pd. ents Tahanto's 
Deed dd and p Mr. Danf, William Hilton's petition en - 
terred & referred to the Committee. 

Now it is a mitter of record that William Hilton arrived 
at Plymouth, in the ship Fortune, Nov'r 11, 1621 ; his wife 
and two children came to Plymouth in the ship Anne, in 
June or July, 1623; one of the children was William 
Hilton, jr., the above named petitioner. He says that he 
and his mother arrived at Plymouth about "one year and 
a half after ;" that reckoned from Nov. 11, T621, makes 
the date in June or July, 1623 ; he further says: "and in 
a lyttle tyme following, settled ourselves upon ye River of 
Paschatq. with Mr. Edward Hilton, who were the first 
English planters there." That settles the question. 

Third. " We have the evidence of Edward Hilton him- 
self, as shown in the New England Historical and Gen- 
ealogical Register of July, 1870, Vol. xxiv, wherein is 
published the " Grant of the Council of Plymouth to 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 187. 

Edward Hilton of Land in New England, dated 12 March, 
1629, [O. S.]" that is, 1620, [N. S.] It was found among 
the Court records of the lawsuit of Allen vs. Waldron, 
of date of February, 1704-5. This suit was one of the 
Mason heirs claims against the New Hampshire land 
owners. It was put in as evidence that Capt. John Mason 
never owned what is Dover and other towns adjoining. 

The Hilton Grant. 

Now know ye that said President and Council by virtue 
and authority of his Majesty's said Letters Patent, and for 
and in consideration that Edward Hilton and Associates 
hath already at his and their own proper cost and charge 
transported sundry servants to plant in New England 
aforesaid, 'at a place there called by the natives Wecana- 
eohunt, otherwise Hilton's Point, lying some two leagues 
from the mouth of the River Paskataquack, in New Eng- 
land aforesaid, where they have already buitt some houses and 
planted Come, And for that he doth further intend by 
God's Divine Assistance to transport thither more people 
and cattle, to the good increase and advancement, and for 
the better settling and strengthening of their plantation, 
as also that they may be better encouraged to proceed in 
so pious a work which may especially tend to the propa- 
gation of Religion, and the great increase of trade, to his 
Majesty's Realms and Dominions, and the advancement of 
public plantations — 

Have given, granted and Engrossed and confirmed, and 
by this their present writing, doe fully, clearly and abso- 
lutely give, grant, Enfeoffe and Confirme unto the said 
Edward Hilton, his heirs and Assigns forever: All that 
part of the River Pascataquack, called or known by the 
name of Wecanacohunt, or Hiltons Point, with the south 
side of said River, up to the fail of the River, and three 
miles into the main land by all the breadth aforesaid ; 
Together with all the shores, creeks, bays, harbors, and 
coasts alongst the sea, within the limits and bounds afore- 
said, with woods and is!ands next adjoining to the land 
not being already granted b> said Council unto any other 



rS3 



FIRST SETTUCMStfT OF NBW HAMPSHIRE. 



person or persons, together also with all the lands. riv*"S 
mines, minerals of what kind or nature soe ever, etc etc.; 
To have and to hold all and singular the said lands aid 
premises, etc. etc. unto said Edward Hilton, his bHrs i id 
assigns, etc. they paying unto our sovereign Ciri »V 
King, one fifth part of gold or silver ores, and anoh^r 
fifth part to the Council aforesaid and their successor* by 
the rent hereafter in these presents reserved, yielding 1 1 1 
paying therefor yearly forever, unto said Council their 
successors or assigns, for every one hundred acres of s lid 
land in use, the sum of twelve pence of Lawful money of 
England into the hands of the Rent gatherer for the time 
b^ing, of the said Council, for all services wh its >ever : — 
And the said Council for the affairs of England, in Amer- 
ica aforesaid, do by these presents nominate, depute, 
authorize, appoint, and in their place and stead put 
William Blackston, of New England, in America, afore- 
said. Clerk ; William Jeffries and Thomas Lewis, of the 
same place, Gents, and either or any 01 them jointly or 
separately, to be their [the Council's,] true and lawful 
Attorney or Attorneys, and in their name and stead to 
enter into each part or portion of land and other premises 
with the appointments by these presents given and granted, 
or into some part thereof in the name of the whole, and 
peacable and quiet possession and seisin thereof for them 
to take, and the same so had and taken in their name and 
stead, to deliver possession & seisin thereof unto Edward 
Hilton, the said Edward Hilton, his heirs, associates and 
assigns, according to the tenor, forme and effect of these 
presents, Ratifying, Conforming and allowing all & what- 
soever the said Attorney, or Attorneys, or either of them, 
shall doe in and about tie Premises by virtue hereof. 

In witness whereof the said Council for the affairs of 
New England in America aforesaid, have hereunto caused 
their Common Seal to be put, the twelfth day of March, 
Anno : Domi : 1629. ( 1630, n. s. ) Ro. Warwick. 

Memo : That upon the seventh day of July, Anno : 
Dmi : Annoq ; R's Caroli pri. Septimo : By Virtue of a 



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 189. 

warrant of Attorney within mentioned from the Council of 
the affairs in New England, under theircommon Seal unto 
Thomas Lewis, he the said Thomas Lewis had taken quiet 
possession of the within mentioned premises and livery 
and seisin thereof, hath given to the within named Edward 
Hilton in the presence of us : 

Thomas VViggin. 
Wm. Hilton. 
Sam'l Sharpe. 
' James Downe. 
Vera copia efficit peruos. 

Tim: Nicholas. 
Pet Coppur.. 
Vera Copia, Attest, Rich : Partridge, Cleric. 

In conclusion it may be well to repeat what has already 
been mentioned, — that the reason for his getting this grant 
was that Capt. John Mason had obtained his New Hamp- 
shire grant on the 7th of November preceding ; and the 
Laconia company only ten days later ; which grants en- 
tirely surrounded Hilton's possessions. The result was 
that Hilton did what every sensible business man would 
under similar circumstances ; that is, he secured a new and 
specific patent, to cover what he had possession of for 
seven years under the David Thomson grant ot six thous- 
and acres. If he had not done that, no doubt Captain 
Walter Neal would have tried to drive him off, as he did 
William Hilton from the cornfield in Kittery, now Eliot. 
The very wording of the grant, shows that the Council 
regarded him as a permanent settler ; not a new man just 
come oyer ; and that he really owned the land. 

Again, there is further evidence that he had been set- 
tled there several years before 1630. In 1628, Governor 
Bradford sent a letter to Tomas Morton, the head man of 
a lively lot of settlers at Merry Mount, in Wollaston, 
req«ie^ ; ng him not to sell guns, amunition and rum to the 
I Hi n^. as he and his men had been doing To this letter 
Morton replied that he defied the Plymouth authorities to 
molest him ; and assured the Governor that there would 
be bloodsheu, should they attempt it. 



190. FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Upon receipt of this letter, Bradford, in June, 1628, 
sent the Plymouth militia, under the command of Captain 
Standish, to subdue them. When the Captain arrived he 
found the settJers baricaded in Morton's house ; and 
Morton, after taunting Standish with a volley of abuse, 
led his men out against the men of Captain Shrimp as he 
styled Standish. In the scrimage which followed, Morron 
was taken prisoner, and the others surrendered ; the only 
shedding of blood being from the nose ot a dru iken 
Merry Mount settler which was scratched with the s.vir i- 
point of one of Standish's soldiers. 

Soon after this, Morton, under arrest, was sent to Eng- 
land in a ship that sailed from the Isles of Shods. fJie 
charges incident to arresting Morton and sending him to 
England were apportioned among the settlements ilong 
the coast, from Plymouth to Manhegan. The total was 
£12, 7s ; of which Edward Hilton paid £ 1 ; his men at 
Pascataquack £2, ios ; Thomson, at Thomson's Island, 
15 shillings: Plymouth, 2£ } ios ; Naumkeag, (Salem,) 
£1, ios; Jeffrey and Burslem, £2; Nantascott, $:,ios; 
Blackston at Shawniut, (Boston,) 12 shillings. 

That shows that Hilton was one of the most substantial 
citizens in New England, and was an old resident, inter- 
ested in preserving order. It also shows that Hilton and 
his men at Pascataqua paid more than auy other place. 

As regards the names of the two places : Hilton's Point 
w r as so named because Edward Hilton settled there in 
,1623, and stayed there. Odiorne's Point was so named 
from the Odiorne family that settled in that neighborhood 
more than a century after David Thomson built his house 
there in the spring of" 1623. It never had any name before 
that. If David Thomson had remained there, a permanent 
settler, as Hilton did at Dover, the place, as a matter of 
course, would have been called Thomson's Point. He did 
not do that ; he went to Boston Harbor in 1826, and resided 
on the island that had been granted him in 1622 ; and the 
place bears the name, Thomson's Island, to this day. The 
names themselves show that the First Permanent Settle- 
ment in New Hampshire, was at Hilton's Point, in Dover. 



FIRST SETTLEMENT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 191. 

In conclusion it seems proper to &ay that it has always 
been the tradition in the Roberts family, passed down irom 
father to sons to the present day, that Thomas Roberts 
came over with Edward Hilton, and settled at Dover 
Point ; and that they came in the spring of 1623 ; and that 
he remained there ten years ; in 1633, when Capt. Thomas 
Wiggin's company arrived, and the settlement was begun 
on Dover Neck, Mr. Roberts removed from the Point to 
the Neck, and built his house on a grant of land the town 
gave him on Fore River, which land has remained in pos- 
session of his descendants to the present day. 

The I^aconia Grant of November 17, 1629, led to the 
first settlement of Strawberry Bank, (Portsmouth,) in 1630. 
The Thomson grant of October 16, 1622, led to the settle- 
ment of Hilton's Point, (Dover,) in 1623. Dover was 
never in any way under control of the L,aconia Company. 



192. CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

QTapfain Jnlyn Blasott. 

BY MOSES A. SAFFORD. 
Read at the Annual Meeting of the Piscataqua Pioneers. 

One year Bgo I promised to write a paper on Captain 
John Mason, in connection with his certified charter of 
August 19, 1635, published in Vol. 2, York Deeds. At 
that time I was not aware that a memoir had been pre- 
pared, or any extended account given of the charter re- 
ferred to. Since that time I have learned that a monogram 
has been written for the Prince Society, in connection with 
several letters and documents appertaining to the man and 
his time, copies of which have been collected. 

Quite a time has been required and much labor expended 
to accumulate the scanty evidences of the real life of 
Mason. Most that is possessed appertains to his official 
intercourse with persons of official distinction. Enough, 
however, has been obtained to form a general outline of 
the character of the man as an official; hence the times in 
which he lived enables us to form a pretty just estimate of 
his character as a man. 

Captain John Mason was born at King's Lynn, in 
Norfolk, the son of John whose father was William, and 
his grandfather, Miles. He was the only son of a family 
of three, being the second child. The register of St. Mar- 
garet's Church, Lynn, Regis, gives the baptisms as 
follows : 

1583, Dec. 1. Sarah Mason, dau. of John. 
1586, Dec. 11. John Mason, son of John. 
1589, Dec. 28. Dorothy Mason, dau of John. 

He matriculated at Magdalen College, Oxford, 25 June, 
1602, as of the county of Southampton, hence it is probable 
that his father had moved from Kings Lynn to Portsmouth 
at this time. No other record of him at Oxford exists. It 
is evident that he did not pursue his course at the 
Uni verity. 

The register of St. Margaret's parish, 1666, Oct. 29, 



CAPTAIN JoTIN MASON. I93. 

shows that he inairied Ane Greene, daughter of Edward 
Greene, Goldsmith. It has betn claimed that Mason was 
of huml/e origin ; Lut since Mr. Tuttle's death evidence 
has b^eu produced which carries his ancestry back three 
generations farther which provts to the contrary. As the 
question is of little consequence for my purpose, I will not 
trouble you with the record of the Visitation Book of 
London, as to pedigree. We are more interested in the 
man himself and his activities than in his origin. 

What I have given is gleaned from data furnished Mr. 
Tuttle by correspondence with Col. Jos. S. Chester and 
others, covering a period of several years. The careful 
habits of Mr. Tuttle in historical matters, leaves little 
room for question as to what he finally accepts as true. 

We mark certain epochs in history by the historic enter- 
prises of distinguished personages, as the invasion of 
Britain by Julius Csesar, or later by William of Normandy, 
— the influences these events have upon the inhabitants 
affected thereby become historic and are peculiar on many 
accounts. Whatever has exalted a people and added to 
their happiness and prosperity, they date back to and 
connect with the chief agent or pioneer in the enterprise, — 
an epoch maker if you please. 

It is a gratification to us to know that Christopher 
Columbus discovered the western continent, that we can 
read his log-book and know just w T here he went, and much 
that he accomplished, and much that was done by the 
country which he represented, as a result of his discoveries. 

Our name is suggestive of information which it w r ould 
be very desirable to possess and which we really ought to 
have, if possible, at the outset of our organization. 

While we are ready to give credit to Captain John Smith 
for his preliminary voyage along our coast, and so near to 
us as the Isles of Shoals, we are more particularly inter- 
ested in the man whose agents landed at the mouth of the 
Piscataqua river, and spread his settlements out on both 
sides of it, so far as it was prudent for him to do. 

Without unnecessary repitition of historic events and 
persons connected therewith, which are matters of history 



194- . CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

well known, let us confine ourselves to the man who was 
more directly instrumental in establishing a settlement at 
this point than any other person, — Captain John Mason 

With the experiences of Sir Walter Raleigh in Virginia, 
of Sir Humphrey Gilbert at the mouth of the Kennebec 
and the Popham colony, Sir Ferdinando Gorges had 
amassed a fund of information through his agents and the 
Indians carried to him from this part of the country ; and 
in 1620 he was ready to apply to the King for a new charter 
to be known as the New England Charter, which was to 
give a perpetual name to this section of the country. It 
granted the territory lying between 40 and 48 degrees of 
latitude and the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The territory 
thus granted was called New England. Gorges and his 
thirty associates were styled the " Council for planting, 
, ruling and governing New England in America." N"one 
but "persons of honor and gentlemen of blood," were 
named as Councillors in the charter. 

A. new and energetic man now comes into view with 
Gorges in his New England enterprises, and who for many 
years after is a chief figure in New England history. — 
Captain John Mison, a young and enterprising man, had 
been in Newfoundland, a governor of the colony of Adven- 
turers and Planters of the cities of London and Bristol, 
chartered in 1610. He held this office as early as 1615. 
He returned to England in the summer of 1621, and im- 
mediately joined Gorges in his New England expedition, 
and their joint enterprise succeeded. 

It is a matter of regret to the historian that so little has 
been preserved of the private records of a man whose ac- 
tivities represented important events upon two continents, 
whose spheres of usefulness were of an historic character, 
and of such political significance to his country. 

The history of Captain John Mason had not been writ- 
ten in 1873, when the Prince Society invited Mr. Charles 
W. Tuttle, of which he was an officer, to prepare as one of 
the publications of the Society, a monogram on the 
Founder of New Hampshire. 

Mr. Tuttle was, from this time to the time of his death 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. I95. 

collecting materials for that purpose, in the hope that the 
English Commission on Historical Manuscripts, which 
had already discovered many important papers in private 
hands, would find valuable documents illustrating the 
life and services of Captain Mason. Mr. Tuttle's death 
occurred in 1881. His manuscripts were then placed in 
the hands of John Ward Dean, A. M., who prepared them 
for the press. 

The memoir was prepared by Mr. Tuttle, who refers to 
the fact that Captain Mason was scarcely mentioned in the 
Puritan literature of Massachusetts Bay;, and he notes 
the cause, which he says lies not v r ery deep : " Mason was 
a churchman and royalist, two things held in equal ab- 
horrence by the Puritans." Pie also refers to the fact that 
as two and a half centuries had passed since his death, it 
was a long time to go back tor materials for his life, which 
extended into the time of Elizabeth. 

Except for the official correspondence and public docu- 
ments today we are no better equipped with materials for 
the life of this man than was Mr. Tuttle twenty-eight 
years ago. The offices which he filled under royal author- 
ity indicate the estimation in which he was held by his 
government, and give evidence of the ability he must have 
possessed. 

Captain John Mason was the only son of John and 
Isabella Mason, and was born in King's Lynn, an ancient 
seaport of Norfolk county. His baptism is recorded in 
the register of St. Margaret's Church at that place, Dec. 
11, 1586. The name of this town bore date from the time 
of Henry VIII ; is an ancient commercial town on the 
easterly bank of the Great Ouse River. 

" For many centuries prior to the birth of Mason, it was 
the first, or one of the first, commercial ports on the east 
coast of England, Its inhabitants were extensively en- 
gaged in trade and fishing. Their vessels were known in 
the Baltic, on the coast of Norway, in the Hibrades, and 
even in Greenland. Its streets, exchanges, and wharves 
were daily thronged with persons engaged in every epecies 
of maratime adventure. There were mariners who had 



196. CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

sailed on every sea, and experienced every peril that wind 
and wave could produce ; there were also merchants 
experienced in every fort of traffic, who knew every vicisi- 
tude of fortune. Such was the current of daily life in 
King's Lynn during young Mason's residence there. It 
wis calculated to awaken, in a youth of his capacity, an 
interest in foreign enterprises and adventure, and to stim- 
ulate a desire to become an actor in the commercial 
drama." 

This is what Mr. Tuttle says of the early home of the 
youth who was later in life to lead an expedition to subdue 
the insurrectionary inhabitants of the Hebrides, to govern 
a Newfoundland plantation in North America, to found a 
state in New England, a Commissary General of His 
Majesties forces in the expediton against Cadez in 1625, 
Treasurer and Paymaster of the English armies employed 
in the war with France in 1626, and later, Paymaster of 
the Army and Navy. 

During this time Mason resided at Portsmouth, the 
chief naval station, as well as later when he was "Captyne 
of South Sea Castle," Vice President of the Great Council 
and Vice Admiral. 

The house which he occupied at Portsmouth is noted for 
being the place where the Duke of Buckingham was 
assassinated, August 22, 1628. Among the letters and 
documents collected by Mr. Tuttle, is one addressed to 
the Duke of Buckingham bearing date at Portsmouth, 
June 13, 1628, iu which occurs this sentence: "Your 
Grace's lodging is prepared in my house here, which will 
not only grace it and myself, but shall bind me perpetually 
to remain Your Grace's most humble devoted servant." 
I mention this to show that Mason was on intimate terms 
with the Lord High Admiral of England, who appointed 
him as his Commissary General. 

In forming an estimate of the character of the man, we 
must remember that he was a staunch royalist, a thorough 
Episcopalian, and possessed of much more than ordinary 
ability. 

From the time he matriculated at the University to 



CAPTAIN JuHN MASON. I97. 

161c, it dees r.ot appear from any account we have, in 
what business Mason was engaged. But it is reasonable 
to infer from his surroundings and the spirit of the times, 
that he left the University to engage in mercantile busi- 
ness Dr. Belknap says he was a merchant in London, 
but no uathorit} is given for the statement. It matters 
not whether he became a merchant in London or else- 
where, — he made himself sufficiently conspicuous to have 
pL.ced under his command two ships of war and two 
pinnaiices t« suppress the insurrectionary inhabitants of 
the Hebrides, of whom an English Admiral said, — 
" The Christian World could not show a mure barbarous, 
more bloody and more untaimed generation," man inhab- 
ited the Hebrides at this time. 

King Janus' object, scon after he came to the thror.e, was 
the restoration of the Episcopacy in Scotland, and the 
reduction of the Highlands and Isles of ScotUuu n, one 
religious and political rule. 

Andrew Knox was the bishop of the Isles; and his 
assistant in things civil as well as ecclesiastical, was 
Captain Mason. Civil and military powers were given 
the Bi>hc»p by the King. In the then condition of affairs, 
it was a most important commission, calling for great 
judgment as well as civil and military skill. 

M ison spent fourteen months assisting the Bishop in 
subduing the rebellious Redshanks. Upon his return to 
England he met with a great disappointment. The Earl 
of Dunbar, then Treasurer of Scotland, who became res- 
ponsible for the expense of the expedition, was dead. He 
had made no provision for the money to pay therefor. 
Mason's disbursements amounted to ^2238. a large sum 
for thase days. As late as 1629, Mason had realized 
nothing ! ut promises for this large sum due him, which 
now aintunUd to ,£12489 7s. In that year he applied to 
King Charles, setting out his services and loss in the 
expe'iti n, for the place of General Remembrancer, which 
it seems he now got. 

It has been doubted by most writers of New Hampshire 
historv, that Mason ever saw the state to v\hich he gave a 



I9S. CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

name. I presume the reason for this is, that he did not 
accompany any of the expeditions which he fitted out, in 
person at least, so far as the record shows. But I have 
good reason for believing; that he visited the Piscataqua 
region while he was at Newfoundland. I base this upon 
his letter to Sir John Scott, August 31, 1617, wherein he 
says : 

" I am now setting my foote into that path where I 
ended last, to discover to the westward of this land, and 
for two months' absence. I have fitted myself with a small 
new galley of 15 tonnes, and to rowe with 14 oares (having 
lost our former). We shall visit the naturalls of che 
country wiih whom I propose to trade, and thereafter shall 
give you a tast ot the event, hoping that withail Terra 
Nova will produce dmanovx to mmefest our gratification, 
— untill which time I rest and shall remain, 

Tuns dum fuus , John Mason." 

It is unreasonable to suppose that a man of Mason's 
training, a shipmaster and trader, would remain six years 
at Newfoundland, without exploring the coast as far west 
as the Piscataqua and Merrimac rivers, when John Smith, 
but three years before, had explored the coast. It is more 
than probable that John Mason and Johu Smith, if not 
personal friends, were well acquainted with each other 
from a business standpoint. If we remember that Smith, 
when a boy at the age of fifteen years, was apprenticed to 
Taomas Sandally, the foremost merchant of King's Lynn, 
the very seaport where John Mason spent his youth, the 
home of merchants, shipmasters and adventurers. 

Is it not probable that the account of the New England 
Coast, published in 1616 by Smith, was known to Mason 
when he Wrote that letter of August 31, 1617. Mason was 
in constant communication with those persons in England 
who were keenly alive to every report of the adventurers 
returning from every part of the New World, from Vir- 
ginia to Newfoundland. If he knew anything of the 
country to the westward, he knew it was more attractive 
in its physical features, than the rough and storm-beaten 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. I99. 

Newfoundland, and that it opened up an interior toward 
the great river of Canada, rich in peltry and trade with 
the natives. The inference in the letter is that he had 
already explored to the west, when he says : " I am now 
setting my foote into that path where I ended last." — 
It is more reasonable to suppose that this was his second 
or third attempt at exploration from the entire letter, 
rather than the first. 

Besides, it is not reasonable to suppose that he would 
have made such elaborate provisions for furnishing a 
colony with all the appliances for successful farming, 
lumber manufacture and defense against the Indians, 
unless he personally knew the nature of the country in the 
vicinity of the Piscataqua in which he was to operate. 
- Reference to the inventory of the goods, arms, etc., at 
Piscataqua and Newichwamock, July, 1635, left by Capt. 
Walter Neal to be delivered to Henry Jocelyn, Esq.j by 
command of Captain John Mason, and received by Am- 
brose Gibbons and Thomas Warrenton, gives some idea 
of the enterprise here four years after the arrival of the 
ships Warwick and Pied Cow. 

John Smith, Walter Neal and Waiter Barefoot, were 
very similar in character. They were bred to arms, ready 
for any adventure that promised duty congenial to their 
tastes, in any quarter of the world ; they were soldiers of 
fortune. The men who entrusted them with commissions 
were men of similar tastes, knowing the value of their 
services and giving commands from headquarters while 
they w r ere in the field of activities. Knowing the spirit of 
the times in the beginning of the seventeenth century, and 
the average Briton who imbibed it, it is not a hard task to 
descrbe Captain John Mason, founder of New Hampshire. 

It does not appear that King James selected Captain 
Mason to command his expedition against the inhabitants 
of the Hebrides from any cause except his evident fitness 
for the duty. By this measurement of his ability by his 
Sovereign, it is easy enough to infer that he had the 
capacity for organizing expeditions of colonizations in 



200. CAPTAIN JOHN MASJX. 

New England. He was broad enough to entrust them to 
others as to details. 

His lavish expenditure of money for his country, as 
well as in his own enterprises, shows that he was generous 
and not narrow in his undertakings of any character 

A pen picture of Such a man would represent him as a 
vigorous type of an Englishman of his day, physically of 
strong build, courageous, of large nautical and commer- 
cial experience, indifferent to ordinary opposition or obsta- 
cles in the way of his enterprises, possessing a large 
knowledge of men, both in the nautical and commercial 
world, with not a little of the experience of one whose 
position tempted him to appeal for royal favors ; a practical 
diplomat ; a man who could eat a full ration in the naval 
service, and pay for an extra mess-bill of solids or liquids 

This was the man who surveyed Newfoundland, and 
published a report on it in 1620, and a map in 1626 ; — 
who explored the coast oi New England in 1617, sent a 
settlement here in 1623, through David Tnompson which 
was followed upon a larger scale in 1631. 

A list of stewards or servants in the employ of Captain 
Mason, or the Leaconia Co. published in N. H. Provincial 
Papers, 5th Vol. gives the names of fifty persons, eight 
Danes and twenty-two women. 

One year ago I promised to speak of the Mason Charter, 
of August 19. 1635, published in Book II. of York Deeds, 
which came into my possession some thirty-five years ago. 
Since then I have learntd of the memoir prepared b> Mr. 
C. VV. Tuttle for the Prince Society, which contains many 
facts relitiiifc to Mason not generally known; a large 
collection of documents of an official and private character 
which throw much light upon the man who at present 
interests us. Among the others published is a copy of the 
Charter above refened to, whose authenticity is discussed 
briefly. • 

I deem it unnecessary to prolong this paper by a copy of 
the Charter since it is published 111 the two volumes before 
referred to. The original folio contains tweut.}-two 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON.. 201. 

manuscript charters, patents, deeds, commissions and 
other documents. 

I will copy from the list of Royal Charters and other 
Documents to Captain John Mason, appended to the me- 
moir before referred to, the introductory statement. — 
"The first statement which I have met with that a charter 
from the King was obtained by Capt, John Mason is in a 
pamphlet, printed in 1728, entitled, " A short narrative of 
the Claim, Title, and Right, of the Honourable Samuel 
Allen, Esq., deceased, to the Province of New Hampshire 
in New England : Transmitted from a Gentlewoman in 
" London, J uly 2, 1728," and signed "I. A." in which it is 
stated that the writer had caused a brief account of " Mr. 
Allen's ris^ht in said Provinces to be prepared." Then 
follows the narrative, in which among the evidence pro- 
duced is an abstract of a charter to John Mason, dated 
August 19, 1635. Later references to such a charter are 
found. William Douglass, M. D., in his "Summary 
Historical and Political," Vol. 1, 1749, p. 418, states that 
King Charles by patent, August 19, 1635, confirmed the 
grant of New Hampshire; and in Vol. II, 1753, p. 24, he 
reprints an advertisement of John Hobby and John Adams, 
who claimed, under a deed of sale, August 28, 1706, from 
Thomas Allen, son and heir of Samuel Allen, to Sir 
Charles Hobby, grandfather of John Hobby, one half of 
the lands which, the advertisement states, were "granted 
to Capt. John Mason of London, by Letters lated March 9 
1621, and confirmed to him by Charter, August 19, 1635." 
This advertisement appeared in "Boston Post Boy," Nov- 
ember 20, 1749, from which newspaper it was reprinted 
by Douglas. 

" There has been much controversy upon the question 
whether a charter was actually granted to Mason. Nothing 
purporting to be a copy of such a document has till now 
been produced. But in March last, after the copy for the 
preceding pages was all in the hands of the printers and 
nearly all the matter was in type, William M. Sargent, 
A. M., of Portland, Me., the editor of the " York Deeds," 
to which reference has already been made, and also of the 



202. CAPTAIN" JOHN MASON. 

"Maine Wills," now in press, was requested by the Pub- 
lishing Committee of the Maine Historical Society, under 
whose charge the York Deeds are published, to furnish 
for the second volume of that work an explanation of the 
reasons which led Robert Mason, in 1667, to cause two 
grants from the Council for New Hampshire to his grand- 
father, Capt. John Mason, to become recorded in Maine. 
Mi. Sargent in looking up the history of the matter, had 
the good fortune to hear of a folio manuscript of eighty- 
four pages in the possession of Mr. Moses A. Safford, of 
Kittery, and to obtain it as a loan. The book contains 
certified copies of documents supporting the claims of 
Capt. John Mason, and those who held under him. 

" Among these documents is a copy of what purports to 
be a charter from Charles I, dated August 19, 1635. This 
is certified to be a true copy, examined by Richard Cham- 
berlain, Secretary to the Province of New Hampshire. 

14 There are three views to be taken of this document of 
which a copy is here preserved : first, that it is a genuine 
charter: secondly, th U it is an unexecuted charter, or a 
draft of one : and thirdly, that it is a forgery. 

'* The chief evidence that it is genuine is the copy of the 
charter here presented, and the attestation of Richard 
Chamberlain of New Hampshire that it is a true copy, the 
presumption being that Chamberlain had the original 
charter.before him. and had made proper investigation of 
its authenticity . The fact that other documents in this 
volume which are certified to by Richard Chamberlain., 
bear date 1683. renders it probable that this was certified to 
about that time, and as Chamberlain was the intimate 
friend of Robert Mason, the inference is that Mason had 
then proof of the original. The copy certainly was not 
made far from 1683 There are other documents in this 
newly found volume, which, though referred to in various 
places, I have not met with in print or manuscript. Most 
of them, however, art preserved in the British State Paptrr 
Office or elsewhere. 

Som* of the reisons for believing that it is an instru- 
ment not fully perfected or a forgery are : 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 203. 

i. No contempory evidence has been produced to show 
that Charles I, granted a charter to Mason : 

2. George Vaughan, writing from London, April 10, 
1636. to Ambrose Gibbons, says that Sir Ferdinando Gor- 
ges told him that Mason was prevented from procuring 
a patent from the King : 

3. The Lords of Trade, in a report to the King, in 1753, 
say : " It is alledged that the last grant to Nason was 
confirmed by the Crown by Charter dated August 19, 
1635, with full power of civil jurisdiction and government, 
but no such charter as this appears upon record." 

4. The ground ot Mason's claim to territory in New 
Hampshire is explicitly stated in the commissions issued 
by Charles II to John Cutt, September 18, 1670. as pres- 
ident, and to Edward Canfield, May 9, 1682, as Lieutenant 
Governor of that province ; but this ground is not a royal 
charter to John Mason, but simply grants to him from the 
Council of Plymouth. 

5. There is no reference to a charter from the King in 
any of the petitions of Robert Nason, nor in the two state- 
ments ol his title, nor in the legal opinions in his case, 
nor in the records of the Privy Council that have been 
printed. " It is to be hoped tbat further developments 
concerning this charter will be made, and that the mystery 
which surrounds it will eventually be cleared up." 

From all of the preceding statements it is evident that 
there were two parties at court. Those wto had the most 
to say said it with the effect to produce unbelief in Mason's 
obtaining a charter, while Mason's friends were disposed 
to say as little as possible, or nothing. 

It would prolong this paper too much to embrace the 
argument of Mr. Henry M. Sargent as published in the 
introduction of Vol. II, York Deeds, in favor of the proba- 
ble authenticity of this charter ; but as we have much that 
has been said against it, I think the Society should have 
in its possession the argument in its favor. This may be 
copied at any time for the files of the Pioneers, as well as 
the charter itself. It may be desirable for our associa- 
tion to have copies of all the documents and letters pub- 



204:- CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

lished by the Prince Society. 

Letters and Documents. 

Patent of Mariana. 

The peace with the French of 1629 returned Quebec to 
the French, and spoiled the prospects of the Canada Com- 
pany which undertook the conquest of Canada as an au- 
thorized private enterprise. 

Sir William Alexander was at its head. Setting out 
with a strong naval force under Sir David Kirk, it cap- 
tured Quebec, took Champlain a prisoner, and, loaded 
with booty, returned to England with the prisoner, Nov'r 
6, 1627, only to learn that peace had been declared several 
months before. 

Next day, Nov. 7, Mason obtained, from the Council for 
New England, the grant of New Hampshire ; and Gorges 
and Mason the Laconia patent ten days later. This was 
very soon after the return from Quebec. The spirit of 
adventure at this time must have been very warm. They 
were only seeking a shorter cut to the Great Lakes from 
the Atlantic. 

The Laconia grant conveyed all the lands bordering on 
the south and east, ten miles ; and on the west, half way 
to the next great lake ; and on the north, to the north side 
of the marn river, which runs from "great and vast west- 
ern lakes." and falls into the grand river of Canada The 
Laconia Company and its history, are familiar enough 
to all. 

Captain Walter Neal was the leader and Ambrose 
Gibbons was the factor of this enterprise. 

Nov. 4, 1631, a patent was granted to Gorges and Mason 
of land on both sides of the river, and also the "Isles of 
Shoals, and the fishings thereabouts." Other persons,— 
J. Cotton, H. Gardner, G. Griffith, T. Wannerron, 
E. Gerry, Thomas and Eliezer Eyre, are named in the 
patent. 

Before Masou's death, the three plantations, Piscataqua, 
Strawberry' Bank and Newichwaunock, fell under his 
control. . • . 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 205. 

The following grants are copied in the Mason Memoir : — 

1. Grant of Masonia, Mar. 9, 1621, by the King ; Cape 
Ann in N. E. by Council of N. England to Mason. 

2. Grants to Gorges and Mason, Aug. 10, 1622, by 
Council of N. E. of Province of Maine. 

3. Grant of New Hampshire, Nov. 7, 1628, to Mason by 
Council of New England. 

4. Grant of Laconia, Nov. 17, 1629, to Gorges and Mason 
by Council of New England. 

5. Grant and Confirmation of Piscataqna, Nov. 3, 1631, 
to Gorges and Mason and others. 

6. Grant of New Hampshire and Masonia, April 22, 1635, 
to Mason with remarks of N. C. Godell, A. M. thereon; 
Also many other letters and documents which are of 
immense"historicarvalue in becoming acquainted with 
the character of Captain John Mason. 

As death ends the career of all earth's personages, be 
they^great or small, from the human standpoint of meas- 
urement, a few have their memories perpetuated for a 
time by their burial place. The great mausoleum of the 
English nation is Westminster Abbey. Here undoubtedly 
was buried the body of Captain John Mason, although 
this fact is not more clearly proven by the record, than is 
that of his charter of 1635. There is no record of the fact. 

Here is another illustration of the uncertainty of records 
which usually bear the stamp of the highest authenticity. 
He directed that his body ''be buried in the Collegiate 
Church of St. Peter, in Westminster, without any funeral 
pomp or ceremony." 

In his will he is described simply as of London. But in 
the Probate Act Book where a separate record of all pro- 
bates was kept, and in which the parish where the testator 
died is usually given, he is described as of the City of 
Westminster. If not buried in the Abbey, as he directed, 
and unless carried away to be buried in the country, he 
ought to have been buried either in St. Margaret's, West- 
minster, or St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, then the only two 
churches in the City of Westminster. 

After an examination of the parish registers of both 



206. CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

these churches, Col. Chester says he can safely say, "that 
he was not buried in either." 

He also states, that the Abbey register for this period 
professes to be imperfect. It was purposely mutilated, 
after the Restoration, for the purpose of getting rid of the 
entries in it relating to the family of Cromwell, and those 
of his associates who had been buried there. The bodies 
of many of them were at that time dug up and thrown into 
a common pit in the churchyard. The same spirit evident- 
ly led to the mutilation of the registers. 

About 1661. one of the officials of the Abbey distinctly 
stated in the commencement of the earliest volume, that he 
collected the fragments and transcribed the entries as well 
as he could. 

From ail the evidence collected upon the subject, I 
think there can be little doubt that the request of Captain 
Mason in his will was complied with. I should state that 
the will of Captain Mason is published in the Memoir. It 
is illustrative of his numerous possessions and assumed 
rights under his various grants and patents. 

In 1874, certain natives of New Hampshire, including 
certain descendants, had erected in the Church of Domies 
Dei, in which Captain Mason used to worship, in Ports- 
mouth, England, a Tablet. 

[A copy of the inscription upon the Tablet, is herewith 
appended.] 

Moses A. Safford. 

****** 

Tablet Inscription, — see page 207. 



The Tablet is thirty by seventeen inches. 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 207. 

Qlopg Bi Inscription on QTaoIsf, 

In Church of Domies Dei, Porismouth, England. 

D. D. John Scribnerjenness, Charles "Levy Woodbury, 
Charles Wesley Tuttle, Alexander Hamilton I,add, 
Charles Henry Bell, Eliza Appleton Haven, 
Charlotte Maria Haven, (all of New Hampshire.) 

To the glory of God and in memory of John Mason, 
Captain in the Royal Navy, Treasurer of the Army, 
Captain of South Sea Castle, Governor of the Col- 
ony of Newfoundland, Patentee and Founder of New 
Hampshirein America, Vice- Admiral of New England 
Born 1635. Died 1686. 

The Faithful Churchman, Devoted Patriot and Gal- 
lant Officer, of whom England and America will ever 
be proud, was buried in Westminster Abbey. 

Also upon the Tablet was inscribed, — 
Repiiblica, 



Seal of 
New Hampshire. 



Neo- Hantoi ensis. 



2 o8. CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 

Early Settlers, 
Sent into New Hampshire, 1631, by John Mason. 

Gleaned from an address of Moses A. Safford. 

As a basis for investigation relative to the descendants 
of the early settlers, I give herewith a list of the names of 
some of those who were sent into the Province of New 
Hampshire by John Mason, in 1631 : 

Walter Neal, steward. Roger Knight. 
Ambrose Gibbons, steward. Henry Sherburn. 

Thomas Comock. John Goddard. 

William Raymond. Thomas Furnald. 

Francis Williams. Thomas Withers. 

George Vaughan. Thomas Canney. 
Thomas Wauerton, steward John Symonds. 

Henry Jocleyn, steward John Peverly. 

Francis Norton, " William Seavy. 

Sampson Lane. Henry Longstaff. 
Reginald Fernald, Cirurgeon William Berry. 

Ralph Gee. ' Jeremy Wolford. 

Henry Gee. James Wall. 

William Cooper. William Brookin. 

William Chadbourne. Thomas Wolford. 

Francis Matthews. Thomas Moor. 

Humphrey Chadborn. Joseph Beal. 

William Chadborn, jr. Hugh James. 

Francis Rand. Alexander Jones. 

James Johnson. John Ault. 

Ant. Ellins. William Brackett. 

Henry Baldwin. James Newt. 

Thomas Spencer. Thomas Blake. , 

Thomas Furral. Thomas Clarke. 

Thomas Hurd. Thomas Crockett. 

Thomas Catherton. William Dermit. 

John Crowther. Stephen Teddar. 

John Wiiliams. Charles Neal. 

There w r ere eight Danes and twenty-two women besides 
these, whose names are not given. 

I 'also give a list of the names of those persons who 
combined by a written compact for the better protection 



CAPTAIN JOHN MASON. 209. 

of themselves under the form and organization called a 
body politic, in 1640. 

The list comprised settlers on both sides of the PiscaU- 
qua River, in Pkcataqua Plantation : 

John Follet. Aben Commock. 

Robert Manney. Henry Beck. 

William Jones. Robert Higgins. 

Philip Swaddon. Thomas Larkham. 

Richard Pinkham. Richard Waldern. 

Barthl. Hunt. William Waldern. 

William Bowden. William Stover. 

John Wastill. William Fnrber. 

John Heard. John Phillips. 

John Hall. Tho. Dunstan. 

Fran. Champernown. William Promfret. 

Stephen Teddar. Anthoney Emery. 

John Hugroufe. Richard Lahorn. 

Thomas Conning. Barth. Smith. 

Thomas Sayton. Samuel Haines. 

Thomas Roberts. John Underhill. 

Edward Starr. Peter Garland. 

James Nute. John Dam. 

Hamerd Knowles. John Cross. 

Edward Colcord. George Webb. 

Henry Longhorn. James Parolius' 

Mr. Spofford adds: — 

I mention these names, not because they are not acces- 
sible, but because they are not so commonly met with in 
the books, as are those of the later generations, in this 
vicinity, — accounts of whom are founc in the various 
publications of a historical character. 



A quaint item from the records of an ancient town : 

" At a meeting of the selectmen of Watertown, December 
3ist:i7ii: the Selectmen being informed by William 
Godden that Ruth Bloss lay dead at their house : the 
select-men considering that sd Bloss had of late been the 
towns care, it is Ordered that the Town Treasurer do pro- 
vide four gallons of Wine, all so Sugar and spice : that So 
sd bloss may have a decent funerall at the towns Cost and 
Charge. 



2IO. MICHAEL HANSCOM. 

Michael Hanscom 's Protection, 1796. 

I Daniel Humphreys, Esquire, Notary Public, In and 
for the State of New-Hampshire, in the United States of 
America, certify and make known to all to whom these 
presents shall come, that the Bearer hereof, viz. — 

Michael Hanscom, of Kittery, in the State of Massa- 
chusetts, born & brought up there, and now an. Inhabi- 
tant of the same Kittery, aged about twenty two years, 
about five feet, seven inches and 3-ioths high, of light 
complexion, light coloured eyes ; & reddish hair. — 
Signs his name as p. margin, — 

(Autograph on the margin, — Michael Hanscom.) 

is a citizen of the United States of America, and as such 
being liable, to be called on in the service of his country, 
is not on any pretence whatever, to be interrupted in his 
lawful business, by Sea or Land, by any Officers, Civil or 
Military, in any place, % nation or country whatever. 
Given under my Hand and Seal of Office, the fourth day 
of June, Anno Domini, 1796, at Portsmouth, in New- 
Hampshire, in the said United States of America. 

Daniel Humphrey. 



A Sad Year. I85I. 

Written by Isaac D. Phillips, Town Clerk of Kittery, 1851-2. 
Copied by J. H. Dixon, Town Clerk of Eliot. 

The schooner, Harvest Home, from trrs port, (Kittery,) 
April 8th, 1851, — has never been heaid from to date, 
(January 19, 1852.) Crew of seven men lost. 

April 16, 1851. It has been blowing a strong breeze 
from the north-east three days ; today, at twelve o'clock, 
the tide arose four and one-half feet above the average 
course of tides ; the highest that has been known for the 
last half century. Also great damage was done along the 
sea coast. 

July 13, 1851. This day commenced fair, with the wind 
North West; vegetation remarkably promising at noon; 
appearance of showers at three o'clock, p. m. Very thick 
at the North, at quarter past three ; — a few minutes later 



OLD ELIOT. 311. 

it commenced a shower of hail and rain, which ran about 
a mile and a half wide, cutting the corn, grain and 
potatoes almost flat to the ground ; killing poultry, 
breaking window glass and some sashes clean out. It did 
a great deal of damage to the Meeting houses in town, by 
the breaking of glass. Over fifteen hundred panes of 
glass were broken in the vicinity of Kittery Point. And 
the storm passed on to Newcastle the same. 

October 26. Frequent showeis of rain. On the morning 
of the 27th, commenced snowing, and continued until one 
o'clock p. m. It is probable that six inches of snow fell. 
It cleared off and froze the ice an inch thick that night. 

o 

Marriages, Copied from EHot Records. 

Continued from Vol. IX, No. II, page 98. 

1892. 
July 16. Joseph W. Hayes, of So. Boston, and 

Olivia E. Gould, of Eliot. 
August 3. Frederick E. Pickering, and 

Manie A. Remick, both of Eliot. 
August 8. Alfred T. Welch, of Eliot, and 

Mabel G. Gammon, of Portsmouth. 
September 14. Nahum Plaisted of Eliot, and 

Mrs. Mary A. Capin, of Taunton, Mass. 
September 24. John L. Fernald, of Amesbury, and 

Carrie B. Foss, oi Kittery. 
September 26. William P. Fernald, and 

Mary O. Tetherly, both of Eliot. 
September 30. Willard F. Paul, and 

Ella M. Staples, both of Eliot. 
October 4. Henry B. Spinney, and 

Jennie Davis, both of Eliot. 
October 12. Edwin H. Fernald, and 

Nellie B. Foster, both of Eliot. 
October 15. Myron E. Spinney, and 

Bertha P. Spinney, both of Eliot. 
October 18. Seth H. Sterling, of Somerville, Mass. • - 

and Nettie H. Shapleigh, of Eliot. 



212. „ . OLD ELIOT. 

October 28. John H. Mathes, of Eliot, and 

Mrs. Ellen T, Clark, of Portsmouth. 

November 24. Frank Dearborn, of Durham, N. H. t 

and Lillian Foss, of Kittery. 

Marriages not included in Vol. 9, No. 2, — recently discovered in another book 
of Eliot Town Reeords: — 

1828. 

December 9. Nathaniel H. Goodwin, of Biddeford, and 

Abigail Ann Raitt, of Eliot. 
December 18. William Toby and Polly Goodwin, 

both of Eliot. 
1829. 
January 29. Joseph Dixon, jr. and Olive Rogers, 

both of Eliot. 
1832. 
February 19. John Mclntire and Dorcas Mclntire, 

both of York. 
June 11. Josiah S. Tuck and Margery Godsoe, 

both ot Kittery. 
1841. 
March 3. Martin Reraick and Olive H. Brooks, 

both of Eliot. 
November 21. Levi J. Shapleigh and Mary Ann Lovell, 

both of Eliot. 
1843. 
June 25. Edward K. Paul and Mrs. Mary H. Goodwin, 

both of Eliot. 
December 24. Jeremiah P. Shapleigh and 

Martha E. Scammon, both of Eliot. 

1744- 
March 28. Charles W. Dixon and Sarah C. Spinney, 

both of Eliot. 
April 28. John Remlck and Maribah Pennell, 

both of Kittery. 
July 14. Jonas McDuffee and Dorcas Jane Hardison, 

both of South Berwick. 
December 8. James Stackpole and Mrs. Mary Linscott, 

both of North Berwick. 



OLD Bl/IOT. 213. 

1846. 
January 25, William C. Merrill, of Newbury, N. H. and 
Anna Goodwin, of Eliot. 

1847. 
August 19. William D. Foster and Hannah R. Hanscom, 

both of Portsmouth. 
August 22. James S. Woodman and Mehitable Nason 

both of Eliot. 
November 7. William Huntress of Newington, N. H. 
and lzette Spinney, of Eliot. 
1848. 
June 25. William A. Manning and Nancy S. Atkerson 
both of South Berwick. 
1850. 
Septbember 1. James M. Wentworth and 

Meribah H. Bartlett, both of S. Berwick 
November 12. William Hodson", of South Berwick, and 
Alaria Taylor, of Porter, Maine. 
1851. 
December 31. Joseph F. Kennard and 

Ellen A. Tobey, both of Eliot. 
1852. 
January 6. Samuel A. Remick and 

Mary A. Tobey, both of Eliot. 
May 30. Joseph Stacy and Mary Ann Chick, 
both of Eliot. 

July 24. Charles M. Wescott and Harriet Ann Mills, 
both of Portsmouth, N. H. 
1854. 

March 11. Temple W. Webber, of Portsmouth, and 
Eliza J. Manson, of Eliot. 

1855. 
March 6, William M. Spinney, of Eliot, and 

Rosanna S. Urch, of Portsmouth. 
April 8. George O. Mclntire and Hannah S. Welch, 

both of York, Maine, 
December 26. Charles A. R. Willey of So. Berwick, 

and Dorcas T. Frost, of Eliot. 



214- OLD KLIOT. 

I8 5 6. 
January 14. Winslow O. Garland and Mary A. Baker, 

(residences not giveu.) 
September 17. Charles E. Stacey and Octavia Frost, 
both of Eliot. 

1857. 
February 4. George W. Leighton and Isabel S. Hanscom 

both of Eliot. 
December 30. George B. Brooks and Annie M. Davis, 

both of Eliot. 
December 16. Joseph C. Snow and Hester A. Fayban, 
both of Scarbor. 
1858. 
January 3. Oliver Prime, Boston, Mass. 

and Emily F. Kennard, of Eliot. 
October 3. Levi W. Adams, of Portsmouth, N. H. and 

Elizabeth A. Staples, of Eliot. 
November 28. John J. Fletcher, of Kittery, and 
Margaret A. Lydston, of Eliot. 
December 24. Benj. P. M. Kimball, of Buxton, Maine, 
and Ruth A. Ricker, of Saco, Maine. 
i860. 
November 29. Samuel A. Staples, of Eliot, and 
Martha A. Place, of Kittery. 
1861. 
May 14. Francis N. Dixon, of Eliot, and 

Lydia S. Sanborn, of Kittery. 
1865. 
January 3. Lyman P. Spinney, of Eliot, and 

Elisabeth F. Gayting, Charlestown. 
1866. ' 
December 30. George Owen Shapleigh and 

Lizzie M. Kennard, both of Eliot. 
J867. 
April 1. Charles M. Boynton, of Concord, N. H. and 

Lizzie M. Ferguson, of Eliot. 
April 1. Obed Wilson, Mrs. Lydia Johnson, both Kittery. 
April 19. Henry H. Spinney, of Eliot, and 

Frances Stoodley, of Portsmouth, N. H. 



OI«D 3I.I0T. 315. 

1867. 

April 19. Edward D. Stoodley, of Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Mrs. Elizabeth Lundy, of Eliot. 
October 30. Charles W. Brown, of Portsmouth, N. H. 

and Ellen A. Staples, of Eliot. 
November 2. George W. Harrington, of Eliot, and 

Sarah E. Floyd, So. Newmarket, N. H. 
Nov'r 28. Geo. T. A. Hall and Mary L. Davis, 

both of Stoneham, Mass. 
Nov'r 28. Orra Page and Nellie T. Staples, 

both of Stoneham, Mass. 
1868. 
January 1. Frederick A. Staples and 

Sarah A. Paul, both of Eliot. 
September 3. Edward K. Paul, of Eliot, and 

Carrie Watson, Salem, Mass. 

Earlier Marriages in Eliot, — then Kittery. 

From Newington, N. H. Church Records ; marriages : 

1754, Sept. r. Mr. Matthew Libbey & Mrs. Lydia 
Libbey, both of Kittery, were marryed. 

1762, Dec. 16. Azariah Libbey & Elizabeth Paul, both 
of Kittery. 

1765 Oct. 31. Timothy Spinney & Abigail Paul, both 
of Kittery. 

From York County Marriage Returns. 1 771-1799. 

Marriages solemnized by the Persons following, viz. by 
the Rev'd Alpheus Spring, pastor of the Second Parish of 
Kittery, now Eliot : 

1787. 
Jan'ry 20th. Nath'l Low of-Coxall & Abigail Goold of 

Kittery. 
Feb'ry nth. James Hill and Sally Hammond, both of 

Kittery. 
April 16th. Timothy Bredeen and Molly Fernald, both 

of Kittery. 
May 3d. Timothy Paul and Elisabeth Tetherly, both of 

Kittery. 
May 17th. Thomas Dixon and Sally Remick, both of 

Kittery. 



2l6. OI.D EUOT. 

1787. 

June 10th. Elijah Drew, of Madbury, N. Hampshire, and 

Abig'l Clarage, of Kittery. 
Aug't 28th. Will'm Garland and Olive Elwell, both of 

Kittery. 
Sept'r 13th. Sam'l Pettegrew, Jun'r, & Anne Cottle, 

both of Kittery. 
Nov'r nth. John Plummer, Lydia Neal,bothof Kittery. 
Nov. 22d." David Staple & Molly Staple, both of Kittery. 
Nov. 27th. Daniel Chickering and Abigail Hubbard, 

both of Kittery. 
Dec'r 16th. Enoch Staple and Eleanor Staple, 

both of Kittery. 
Dec. 20th. Joshua Small, Jun'r, of Limington, and 
. Mary Clerk, of Kittery. 

David Furbish and Elisabeth Libbey, 

1788. 
March 15th. by Dl. Pierce, Esq'r : 

Meads Furbish and Mary Gould, both of Kittery. 
Marriages Solemnized 1788, by the 

Rev'd Alpheus Spring, of what is now Eliot : 
April 21. Stephen Sewall ot Bath and 

Abigail Bartlett, of Kittery. 
June 15th. John Heard Bartlett, Esq'r, and 

Mrs. Elisabeth Atkinson, of Kittery. 
June 15th. James Floid of Portsmo', and 

Elisa' Remick, of Kittery. 
Aug't 6th. George Spring & Anna Libby, Kittery. 
Oct'r 5th. Peter Staple, jr. Berwick, and 

Nabby Hammond, Kittery. 
<r Major Joseph Frost, Mary Shapleigh, Kittery. 

Dec'r 23d. Benja. Gerrish, Berwick, and 

Miriam Fergerson, Kittery. 
1789. 
Jan'ry 22d. Joseph Jordan, of Biddeford, and 

Mary Leighton, Kittery. 
Jan'y 26, Nath'l Remick and Abigail Paul, Kittery. 
Jan'y 30, Winthrop Scrigens & Hannah Mendum, Kittery 
Feb 8. Amos Pike, Berwick, and Sally Stacy, Kittery. 



OLD ELIOT. 217. 

B)ElI-kttonm Mm of Vqt Jgml (&tntT$i\m. 

Timothy Dame. 

One of our most prominent men was Timothy Dame, 
the subject oi this sketch. 

He was a member of the old New England family of 
Dames, who were among the early settlers of our Country ; 
the son of Timothy and Sarah (Ricker) Dame. 

He was born in Newington, N. H. January 7, 1832 ; 
and lived in Eliot from the age of twenty till the time of 
his death, March 9, 1891. 

For many years he served this town as Selectman and 
and Town Agent ; was elected Representative to the 
Legislature in 1861, 1867, and again in 1888, when he 
served on the Committees on Towns and Public Buildings, 
being Chairman of the latter. Also held the office of 
Notary Public and Justice of the Peace. 

He was employed by the government as Clerk in the 
office of the Constructor at the Navy Yard, in the year 
1861 ; and as Constructor's Chief Clerk, during the latter 
part of Lincoln's administration ; and also through 
Grant's and Arthur's terms of office. 

He was an expert mathematician and civil engineer, 
and did a great deal of land surveying throughout this 
region, and settled many estates. 

Mr. Dame was a genial friend ; strong in his likes and 
dislikes ; and well known throughout a large section of 
Maine and New Hampshire. He was a ?ery entertaining 
conversationalist, and commanded the respect of all who 
knew him. He was for many years a leading spirit in 
public affairs. 

Mr. Dame was married in 1852, to Elizabeth F. Spinney, 
daughter of Jacob R. and Lucinda L. (Dixon) Spinney. 
He had five daughters : 

Lizzie May, who married W. S. Trip, Esq. of 
Iron River, Wisconsin ; 



2l8. 



OLD ELIOT. 



Angie, who married Dr. Jas. K. P. Rogers, of 

South Portland, Maine; 
Ella A., Laura V., and Lillian, — 
all of whom are living. 



George Washington Brown. 

One of the widely known citizens of Eliot, is the Rev'd 
George W. Brown, Pastor of the Advent Church. 

He is a native of Eliot ; and his early history has an 
unusual variety of efforts and incidents, and gave him 
glimpses not only of life, but of the world. 

He was born July 29, 1832 ; he is, therefore, seventy- 
eight years of age ; nearly fourscore, but active in church 
and town interests. 

He was the son of Benjamin and Alice (Dixon) Brown. 
His father was born in Wakefield, N. H.; and he enlisted 
in the army in the war of 1812 ; he served one term, and 
then re-enlisted, and was stationed at the Fort in 
Newcastle. 

About the year 1844, at twelve years of age, George 
left his home, and for three years he lived upon the farm 
of Stephen Jenkins at Sturgeon Creek. It proved a 
pleasant and profitable development ; and in 1848, he 
worked upon the farm in Portsmouth, where the Paper 
Mill now is. 

The next year, 1849, ne entered another line of work 
and duty : he went aboard the schooner Arcade, Capt. 
John Fisher, and, with the lively crew, sa 'led to the Bay 
of St. Lawrence, for mackerel. 

The memory of this trip upon the Bay did not forsake 
him ; and again, in 185 1, he boarded the Arcade, and with 
the same Capt. Fisher, sailed to the Western Banks for 
Cod Fish. It was a voyage that left a memory that has 
not faded ; for the schooner entered Shelburn Harbor, 
April ir, 1851, and it was days before it could go forth 
again. It was a time that is now a chapter of history : the 



OLD ELIOT. 



219. 



storm that destroyed the Minot Ledge Lighthouse. 

Again, the schooner made a trip, — and the design of the 
voyage was to obtain mackerel. But, like the earlier trip, 
another most fearful tempest, — to this day called the great 
gale, — came, the third day of October. 

The Arcade was in the midst of a large fleet of vessels 
in the bend of Prince Edward's Island. It was a fearful 
night ; but the Arcade passed out by the North Cape, and 
escaped. Ninety vessels were wrecked and three hundred 
men were lost. 

After these experiences, Mr. Brown devoted his time to 
shipyards. He was on Badger's Island, in 1852 ; in 1853, 
on Noble's Island ; in August, at Kennebnnk. 

Again, in January, 1854, he was in Donald McKay's 
yard at Boston. Through the entire year he was in the 
vicinity of Boston. 

These duties of ship building, and also securing the 
timbers suitable for the work, continued two more years, 
then came another trip on a fishing boat: — 

The Ann Eliza, Capt. John LaMerry, went to the Bay 
of St. Lawrence, for Mackerel. 

The same year (1856,) at Gloucester, he shipped on 
board the William Bobson, with Capt. Ford, for the Bay 
of Lawrence ; and in 1857, he sailed again with the same 
man, in the schooner Fitz E. Riggs, and went twice to the 
Bay. 

Mr. Brown's religious career began in 1857-8. Fifty 
years later, Mr. Brown wrote: "From that time my life 
beca;.ie a success." He saw at the early date of 1857-8, 
that a new work was before him ; and he began his prep- 
aration by going to Kent's Hill, in 1859, — a student. 

In 1860-61, he was a school teacher, in Eliot. Then 
again he was at Kent's Hill, renewing his studies. 

He had a local preacher's license at this date, for two 
years, given him by the Methodist officials. 

In 1864, he became interested in the Advent principles, 
and was ordained as Minister by the Conference at Alton 
Bay, the same year. 



220. OLD ELIOT. 

For seven years he was President, and for nine years 
Vice President of the yearly Alton Bay Conferences, and 
is yet of the Ministerial Committee. 

His association as Pastor of the Advent Church of Eliot 
has continued from its very begining, as will be seen by 
reference to Old Eliot, vol ix, No. i, page 41. 

His name will be familiar, even in years to come. 

An excellent portrait of him is in the World's Crisis, 
Jauuary 18, 1905. 

He married Miss Sarah A. Knight, the daughter of 
Timothy and Mary A. (Pinder) Knight. May 14, 1863. 

We can add to the foregoing, that Mr. Brown was a 
member of the Order of Odd Fellows. He joined the 
New Hampshire Lodge, No. 17, I. O. O. F. May 30, 1855. 
He is still a member. 



The journal of the Rev. John Pike, 1705, states, — 

" May 21: Old James Tobie was kill'd by the Indians, 
in Kittery woods, — John Rogers wounded the same day, 
but escaped & was healed. 



HISTORICAL PRESS, 

William Fogg House, 

Old Road, 

ELIOT, MAINE. 



111. 



INDEX TO OLD ELIOT, VOL. IX, 1909. 

Compiled by Joseph H. Dixon. 



The letter a following a number denotes that the name is 


found on succeeding pa 


.ges ot the same article. 




CONTRIBUTORS AND REFERENCES. 




Aldrich, T. B. 




11 


Langton's Address 


7 


f Boston Post Boy 

Boston Transcript 




261 


Lincoln's Address 


7 




8 


Moses, John M. 


8 


Brewster, C. W. 
Brown, George W. 




11a 


N. E. Reg'r 104, 165, 


184a 


41 


. 44 


Pike, Rev. John 


136 


Butler, Mary A. 




105 


Reeve, Samuel H. 


109 


Dennett, Alexander 




*3 


Remick, Oliver P. 1 


> 34 


Dixon, Joseph H. 




210 


Satford, Moses A. 192 


209 


Foggi Jeremy 




35 


Scales, John 


157 


Fogg Wm. 28, 30, 
Good New? of Engla 


46, 


114 


Shapleigh, Charles A. 


80 


nd 


172 


Shedd, C. F. 


35 


History of Boston 




174 


Shillaber, B. P. 


29 


History of Heraldry 




21 


Stacey, M. 


115 


History New Englan 


d 


169a 


Stackpole. Everett 


8 


Histor> of Plymouth 




171a 


State Papers (N. H.) 


8a 


Keefe, Francis 




30 


Willis, J. L. M. 


123 


1 




INDEX : 




Abbott, Betsey 




58 


Adams Lizzie C. 


96 


Charles 




48 


Lydia 


59 


% Daniel 
| Esther A. 




58 


Margaret 


17a 




96 


Mary 


H 


Academy, Andover 




51 


Mercy 


67 


Berwick 




117 


Nathaniel 


59 


Boscawen 




5^ 


William 


67 i 


J Eliot 49a, 


117 


Addison, Maine 


82 


Adams, Alice R. 
Amy 




97 


Adlington, Eliza J. 


9i 




18 


Mary L. 


96 


Charles 




18 


Agamenticus 


170 


Christopher 




17 


Albany 


83 


Edward P. 




96 


Alexander, William 


264 


Elisha 




109 


Alfred 31 


» 57 


Elizabeth A 




214 


Allen, john K. 


122 


Emily 




73 


Matilda B. 


80 


1st 




96 


Samuel 


261 


John 


18, 


201 


America 4, 157a, 


207 


Levi W. 


87, 


214 


Amesbury 97, 


211 



IV. 



Anderson, Charles 84 

Andover, N. H. 87 

Andrews, Joan 132 

John 12S, 131a 

Applcdore, 132, 154 

Appomatox 7 

Argall, Samuel 165 

Argentine 54 

Arlington, Mass. 103 

Army, Continental 33 

Army Provincial 16a 

Arrowsick 47 

Arthur, Chester 217 

Ashen Swamp 150 

Aspinwall, Olive A. 86 

Athorne, Ella M. 94 

Mary F. 41a 

Oliver 41a 

Atkins, John W. 107 

Atkinson, Elizabeth 216 

Kinsman, 107, nxa 

Ault, John 208 

Austin, Joseph 137 

Babb, Peter 132 

Philip 128, 132 

Bachelor, Charles H. 120 

George 92 

Mary 128, 1325 

Stephen 132a 

Badger, Samuel 38 

Baker, Caroline G. 79 

Charles 65, 107 

Maty A. 85, 214 

Samuel 92 

Baldwin, Henry 208 

Baltimore, 44 

Bangor 68, 70 

Barefoot, Walter 199 

Barlow, George 133 ^ 

Barnard, Albert F. 107 

Barnstable 133 

Barnstead n 

Birrington 12, 57, 65 

Birraw, Oliver 66 

Bartholomew, Henry 186 



Bartlett, Abbie G. 97 

Abigail 76, 213 

Abigail G. 113 

Alfred 113 

Alice 61, 106 

Ann 66 

Annie 97 

Benjamin F. 83 

Caroline A. 113 

Carrie L. 97 

Charles E. 76 

Daniel 71, 78 

Dorcas 57 

Ebenezer 61, 106 
Elizabeth 120, 216 
Emily D. 91 

George C. 88 

George E. 90, 92 
Hannah 60 

Horace E. 91 

Howard E. 97 

James 34, 59, 144 
Jas. W, 87, 97, 113a 
Jeremiah 34 

John 32 

John H. 113, 216 
Lizzie D. 90 

Lucy 59 

Lydia F. 97, 114 
Mary J. 106, 108 
Matilda P. 84 

Mehitable 113 

Meribah H. 213 

Nathan 76, 113, 130 
Nathaniel 76 

Nath'l S. 8, 62, 77 
Phebe 88 

Sally 58 

Sarah 58, 62 

Sarah F. 8 

Sylvester 85, 113 
Thomas C. 66 

William 60, 77 

Bates, Frank A. 132 

Bath 58, 117, 216 



V*. 



Bay, A Hoi: 



Great 


179 


Ipswich 


r 54 


Little 


179 


Mass'tts 128, 1 


58a, 195 


Mobile 


7 


St. Lawrence 


219a 


Beal, Joseph 


108 


Bean, Abigail P. 


102 


Carrie B. 


104 


John 


102 


Lemuel W. 


104 


Martha 


68 


Mary L. 


104 


Mary S. 


104 


Miriam 


102 


Philip C. 


104 


William H. 


104 


Bedell, A. K. L. 


85 


Bee Hive 


H 


Beex, John 


9- 149 


Belfast 


86 : 89 


Belknap 


184, 197 


Bell, Charles H. 


207 


Belliiigham, Gov'r 


125a 


Bennett, Mary A. 


88 


Bent, Oren 


106 


Benton, Juliette 


93 


William W 


93 


Berdeen. Lucretia 


58 


Berry, William 


208 


Witners 


56 


I erwick 5, 9, 40, 46 


1 47, 57, 


60, 70, 72, 


92, 115a, 


138, 144, 1 


46, 149, 


216. 




Bickford, Ichabod, 


Mary 67 


Susan F 


91 


Biddeford 


113, 212a 


Billings, John 


148, 


John Q. 


121 


Sarah P. 


120 


Bird, Caroline D. 


73 


Horatio 


73 



209 
27, 119a 

44 
30 



Black, Elizabeth 59 

Statira 59 

Blaisdell, James 65 

Lucy 65, Mercy 67 
Blake, Thomas 208 

Blaxton, William 175, 188 
Bloss, Ruth 
Bodge, George 
Booze 
Boscawan 
Boston 1, 22, 27a, 32a, 42, 
46, 54. 67, 70, 72, 82 
84, 86, 104, 117a, 125 
138, 144, 146, 165a • 
214, 2x9. 
Boynton, Charles M. 

Lizzie M. 
Bracey, Sarah A. 
Bracken, William 
Bradford, Gov. 
Bradstreet, Ann 

Simon 
Brance, Michael 
Bredeen, Molly 

Timothy 
Breed, Charles H. 
Brewster, "Eider" 

L. W. 
Bridge, Dover 
Bridges, Olive A. 
Samuel 
Bridgwater 
• Bristol, Eng. 
Brock, John 
Brook, Shorey's 
Brookin, William 
Brookline 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

i, 27 
Brooks, 

Abigail 
Abraham 
Alfred L. 

Continued next page 



12' 



214. 

214. 

72 

208 
169a 

127 
125a 

h 133 

215 

215 

SO 
179 

27 
I40 
I08 
108 
IOI 
I94 

151* 
I46 
208 
I O4 

I02 



71 



63 
81 

9i 





4 

Tl 


r 






; 


BROOKS— Continued : 


BROOKS 


Continued; 


■-. 




Alice A. 


94 




Olive H. 




222 


Alpheus B. 


95 




Polly 




6l 


Alpheus H. 7 


2, 88 




Samuel 




62 


Andrew P. 


94 




Sarah B. 




73 . 


Angeline 


87 




Shuah 




66 


Ann E. 


74 




Sylvester M 




80 


Ann W. 


67 




Thomas 




74 


Anna 


44 




Thomas F. 




67 


Annie M. 


214 




Viana R. 




95 


Asa 


62, 109 




Walter T. 




84 


Augustus 


9i 




Washington 


64 89 


Augustus W. 


80 




William 


56 


114 


Benjamin 


81 




William H. 




7i 


Betsey 


77 




William J. 




96 


Catherine 


67 




William 0. 




86 


Chandler 


73 


Brown 


, Alice 


59. 


218 


Charles \V. 


82 




Benjamin 


59. 


218 


Daniel 


60, 93 




Charles H. 


43 


. 77 


El bridge 


96 


- . 


Charles W. 




215 


Eliza A. 


70 




Delia H. 




86 


Eliza J. 


74 




Ellen A. 




215 


Elizabeth 


60, 72 




Fannie D. 




89 


Elizabeth K. 


80 




George 




115 


Ellen F. 


96 




George W. 


41a 


1, 89 


Emeline 


62 






92, 


218a 


Emma I. 


93 




John S. 




84 


Frances C. 


90 




Mary E. 




96 


George B. 


214 




Sara A. 




220 


Hannah 


62 




Susan A. 




79 


Hannah T. 


81 


Browner, Jacob 




34 


Ida M. 


96 


Browr 


ifield 




66 


Jamt-s W. 


84, 87 


Broug 


hton, Thomas 




142 


Lavina 


89 


Brunswick 




98 


Leander 
Levi 


92 


Buck, 


Valeria 




97 


66 


Bull 


Run 




1 


Lucretia 


74 


Burbank, Frank 




49 


Margaret P. 


73 


Burlei 


gh, Susan A. 




79 


Mary 


. - 75 


Burnham, Lydia 




69 


Marv A. H. 
Mary E. 


82 


Burroughs, William 




48 


89, 91 


Bursley, Joan 




133 


Mary G. 


7i 




John 




127a 


Mary J. 


73, 96 


Burt, 


Thomas J. 




87 


Olive A. 


66 


Butling, Jeremiah 




71 



Vh. 



Butler, Abba V, 




61 


Catherton, Thomas 




20S 


Gertie H. 




96 


Caul, Arthur 




65 


Joseph H. 




96 


Elizabeth 




59 


Mary E. 




84 


Joseph 




• 59 


Oliver 




61 


Cedars 




139 


Richard A. 




73 


Cemetery 3 


[6, 


119 


Buxton, 




214 


Centreville 




73 


Buzzell, Mary 




59 


Chadbourne, 






Byrarn, Experience 




IOI 


Humphrey 128, 13 


3a, 


145 


Nicholas 




ior 


208 






Cadiz 




196 


Lucy 




*3i 


Calcutta 




33 


Patience 




143 


California 


32, 


103 


Wm. 12S, 134a, 1 


43 , 


20S 


Cambridge 27, 53, 84, 9 


[., 92 


Chandler, Charles P. 




82 


93, 94. 


102a 


120 


PI anna h E 




61 


Camden 


92 


204 


Lavinia 




79 


Cammock, Thomas 


40, 


i 4 r 


Mary A. 




5* 




181, 


208 


Samuel 60 


6i 


, 64 


Campbell, Giles 




106 


66 


68 


Canada 


92, 


204 


Charles I. 




124 


Canney, Thomas 


120, 


20b 


Charleston, Me. 


7o> : 


Cape Ann 


157, 


205 


Charlestown, Mass. 






Cod 




56 


8, 90, 102, 


214 


Elizabeth 40, 47, 


176 


Champernown, Francis, 


[40a 


Neddick 




148 


Champlin 


41, 


204 


North 




219 


Chapman, T. C. 




107 


Capin, Mary A. 




211 


Chase, Hezekiah 




107 


Card, Abigail 




62 


Theodora 2a, 


27> 


121 


Henry 




62 


Chauncey, Alice R. 




97 


Carpenter, Mary P. 


P. 


73 


Samuel H 




97 


Carter, Augusta C. 




88 


Cheever, Ellen 




103 


Florence E. 




98 


Chelsea 




98 


H. B. 




noa 


Chepachet, R. I. 




122 


Mary A. 




88 


Chester, J. S. 


193a 


Sally 




64 


Chester, N. H. 




87 


Casco 40, 90, 91, 


142 


Chicago 54, 98, 103, 117, 


122 


Cassovia, Antoni 




103 


Chick, Amos 




34 


Elenor R. 




103 


Augusta 




92 


Mary L. 




103 


Caleb E- 




7i 


Castine 




96 


Catherine 


65 


f 77 


Cate, Mary H. 




77 


Constant 




70 


Samuel 




11 


Deborah 




7i 


Cater, Pamelia 




61 


• Hannah 




67 


Samuel 




61 


Jane 




37 



tfttl, 



Chick continued 








Cleme 


Louisa 






'66 


Clevel 


Mary A. 




82, 


213 


Coat 


Richard 






34 


Cobb, 


Sarah 






64 




Thomas 


65 


, 66 


> 67 




Ursula 






74 


Coffin, 


Chickering, Abig 


lil 




216 


Colby 


Daniel 




216 




Church, 










Advent 


4 


ra, 


218a 


Cole, 


Baptist 






12 




Christian 




2r, 


41a 




Congregational 


4 


12, 


105 




Domines Dei 




206 


207 




Episcopal i, 8, 


124, 


1 So 




Independent 






12 




Methodist 


106a, 


[09a 




St. Margaret 






192a 




Wesley a a 






no 




Christian Shore 






14 




Crystal Palace 






32 




Claflin, Gov'r 






53 




Clancey, John E. 






107 




Clarage, Abigail 






216 




Claremont, N.H. 27, 


104 


, 122 




Clark, Ann A. 






82 




Anne 






10 




Betsey 






57 




Bridget 






10 




Ellen T. 






212 




Emily E. 






88 




Ephraim 






34 




Johnson 






81 




Josiah B. 






74 




Margaret 






TO 




Mary 






2l6 




Nathaniel 






57 




Reginald 






39 




Samuel 




IO, Vi 




Sarah 






10 




Thomas 






208 




William C. 






116 





ns, Thomas 
and, G rover 
f Arms 

Fanny 
Gershom F. 
John 
, Edmund 

14; E. K. 
Hannah M. 
Lydia 
Abner 
Ai S. 
Amiaz 
Anna 

Arabella F. 
Aurilla M. 
Carrie H. 
Charles 
Charles H. 
Eleanor 
Eliza A. 
Elizabeth W 
Ella A. 
Ernest E. 
Esther 
Florence 
Frank 
George C. 
Hanibal H. 
Ichabod 
Isabel F. 
John H. 
Johr R. 
Levi 
Lucy A. 
Lula L. 
Lydia A. 
Martha J. 

Mary E. 

Mary R. 

Polly 

Rebecca 

Rosanna 

Samuel 



113 

44 

21 

101 

107 

107 

34 
112 

81 

14a 

66 

90 

163a 

44 a 

94 

94 

92 

70 

45 
68 
68 

67 
93 
98 
66 

45. 93 
54 
45 
45 
44^, 73 
94 
45 
9* 
67 
71 
97 
84 
78 
67, 78 

44 73 
61, 67 

94 
83 
74 



Cole, continued > — 

Samuel E. 93 

Sarah A. 74 

Susan 45 

Susan R. 51 

William 61, 163 

William G. 18 

Colebath, Lucy 75 

Coleman, James 136 

Jairus 83 

Rosamond F. 90 

College, 

Dartmouth 51a, 113, 149 
$lagdalen 192 

Tufts 52 

Collins, Charles 149 

Colmer, Abraham 67 

Columbus, C. 193 

Columbus, Ohio, 27 

Concord, N. H. 1,27, 68,93 
104, no, 214 
Congress, Con. 34 

Conly, Abraham 128 135 149 
Judith 135, 149 

Connecticut 123 

Constance, Eng. 18 

Constantinople, Alfred 92 
Cook, Elizabeth B. 86 

James, Maria 58 

Cooper, Ellen J. 102 

Peter 189 

William 208 

Cottle, Anne 216 

Emma, 92 

Mary E. 94 

Thomas J. 71 

Cotton, J. 204 

William 120 

Copeland, David 109 

Court, .General 4a, 20, 101 
124, 132, 134, 138, 142 
146, 147, 181 
Cousins, Amos 78. 91 

Oliver M. 107 

Coxall, 215 



56' 
132 

137 
135 
143 
148 
148 
136 

i«3 

132 

140 

noa 

74 

74 

106 



Cove, 

Babb's 
Birch Point 
Cow 
Great 
Mast 

Mendum's 
Miller's 
Pomeroy's 
Rogers 
Tucker's 
Craft, F. A. 
Cram, Benjamin H. 

Elizabeth 
Crandall, Phineas 
Crane, Florence A. 2a, 27, 121 
Creek, — 

Cammock's 29, 135, 141, 145 
Daniel's 115 
Davis' 135, 145 
Fresh 149 
Hill's 135 
Mill 14a, 141, 145 
Sagamore 5, 8a 
Shapleigh's 141, 145 
Spinney's 17, 143 
Spruce 29, 136, 140, 141 
142, 145, 146, 
147, 148 
Sturgeon 40, 56, 114, 115 

*37, i39» Hi, 
146, 150,. 218. 



Weir, 
Crockett, Daniel 



Thomas 
Crockett's Neck 
Crosby, Harry C. 

Joseph 

Loretta M. 

Nancy 
Cioss, Ezther 
Crodofore, Lucy 
Cromwell, Oliver 
Crooked Lane 136, 145, 146 
Crowther, John 203 



148 
107 
208 
142 
98 
73 
95 
73 
l 7 
73 

206 



X. 



Cuinmings, Bertha E 

Fred E. 
Cushman, Mary- 
Cutler, Nancy Y. 
Cutting, Lucy A. 
Cutts. Abigail 
Mary J. 

Miranda 

Paulina 

Richard 

Robert 

Samuel 
Dame, Angle A. 

Elizabeth F. 

Ella A. 

Laura V. 

Lillian 

Lizzie M. 

Lillian 

Lizzie M. 

Timothy 
Davenport 
Davis, Annie M. 

Bryant 

Daniel 

Elizabeth 

Eunice 

Hannah 

Jennie 

John 

Joseph W. 

Mary L. 

Nancy H. 

Samuel 

Sarah 

William 
Danforth, Thomas 
Darling, Alvah 

Emily M. 
Darmouth, England 
Davoll, Ada W. 

Frederick P. 
Deane, Charles 
John W. 



97* 



95 



95 



128, 



57 



9 S 


Dearborne, Frank 


212 


98 


Lilian 


212 


89 


Decoff, James H. 


90 


90 


Deerfield 


I04 


81 


Deering, Hannah C. 


77 


77 


John W. 


27 


87 


Roger 


148 


87 


Delaven, 111. 


72 


84 


Dennison, Daniel 


125 


, 17 


Dennett, Agnes 


19 


136 


Alexander 2a, 


13a 


43 


• 26, 55, 


121 


218 


Amy 


17a 


217 


Charles 


18 


218 


Ebenezer 


55 


218 


Ephraim 


J4 


218 


Esther 


17 


217 


Hugh 


• 18 


218 


Jeremy B. 


22 


217 


Joseph 


16a 


217 


Josephine 


27 


141 


John 13a, 56, 60 


214 


i<4. 143 




34 


John L. 


19 


135 


Lydia 


14a 


74 


Mark 20 


1 75 


7, 6l 


Mary 


17a 


63 


Peter 


18 


211 


Pompey 


18 


63 


Samuel 


17 


90 


Shuah 


60 


215 


Thomas 


19 


65 


William 


20 


57 


William H. 


19a 


92 


Winfield S. 


22 


65 


Dermit, William 


208 


186 


Des Moins 27, 


121 


87 


Devon, England 


I57a 


87 


Dexter, Fred I. 


95 


147 


Maggie 0. 


95 


98 


Diamond, John 




98 


128, 135a, 


142 


165a 


Dickey, Ella A. , 


93 


195 







XI. 



Dixon. 



Abram C. 


64 


Adeline 


53 


Albert R. 


95 


Alberta NT. 


98 


Alexander 


89 


Alice 


218 


Alvin 


91 


Andrew J. 


87 


Anua 


45 


Annette C. 


90 


Arabella S. 


93 


Bertha M. 


94 


Betsey 


90 


Charles H. 


43 


Charles W. 


41, 82 


Daniel S. 


74 


Daniel W. 


93 


Edmund A. 


77 


Eliza J. 


69 


Elizabeth P. 


79 


Eva C. 


95 


Fanny 


63 


Francis N. 


88, 214 


George M. 


80 


George W. 


94 


Harriet 


78 


Henry 


63 


Joseph 


212 


Joseph K. 


42, -94 


Laura E. 


95 


Lucinda L. 


217 


Lydia N. 


74 


Lydia S. 


214 


Martha J. 


77 


Martha M. 


79 


Mary 


67 


Mary E. 


67. 71 


Mary J. 


87 


Olive 


212 


Olive S. 


70 


Oliver I 


2* ' So 


Richard F. 


43> 87 


Sally , 


215 


Samuel 


42a 



Dixon, continued, — 

Sarah A. 87 

Sarah C. 212 

Sarah S. 81 

Statira M. 64 

Stephen A. 87, 91 

Thomas 215 

William R. 67 

Dolbear 52a 

Dole, Hersena F. 85 

Dolloff, Melvina D. 70 

Donell, Ann 66 

Ellen F. 96 

Henry F. 88 

Dorchester, 90. 98, 103, 174 

Dorr, George 61 

* Jane 61 

Sarah 78 

Douglass, William 201 

Dover, N. H. 5, 27, 50a, 55a 

58, 62, 63, 65, 67, 71 

74, 77, 81, 83, 88, 90 

95. 96, 97. 120a, 137a 

148, 162a. 

Dover Neck 179a 

Dow, George F. 122 

Downe, James 189 

Downing, Benjamin F, 90 

Dennis I29, 136 

Joshua 136, 144 

Mary 62 

Percival 92 

Sally 60, 62 

Thales 62 

Drew, Abigail 216 

Elijah 216 

Jonathan 60 

Robert 88 

Sarah 60 

Dunn, Betsey Sj 

Christopher 87 

Ellen * 84 

George 38 

Jeremy 37 



xii; 



Dunn, conti?itied, 




Joshua 


38 


Mary 


67 


Nathaniel 


38 


Richard F. 


67 


Duphine Machilde 


92 



Durgin, Hannah 136 

William D. 86 

Durham, N. H.. 5, 72, 120 212 

Duston, Hannah 136 

Thomas 128, 136 

Duxbury 101 

Dyer, Payson G. 72 

Earle, Lizzie F. 97 

E. Boston, 27, 102a, 145, 174 

Edgerly, Thomas 120 

Elder, Margaret - 35 

Eldredge, William P. 107 

Eliot, Robert 55, 112 

Eliot Neck 109, 1 4.3 

Elkins, N. H. 1 27. 121 

Ellins, Anthony 208 

Elwell, Olive 216 

Emerson, Miranda . 59 

Silas M. 107 

Emery, Anthony 128 137 139 

Benjamin F. 68 

Caleb 58, 60 

Catherine 65 

Clarence P. 27, 122 

Daniel 34, 37 

Eliot 72, 89, 108 

Elvira S. 86 

Enoch 64 

Eunice 66 

E. W. 119 

France 137 

George U. 77 113 

Hannah 64, 108 

Hiram 87 

James 37, 128, 137a 

Japhet 64 

Joseph 108 

Joshua 69 



Emery continued : 

Lizzie C. 96 

Lydia 57; 60 

Lydia A. - 91 

Mary 64 

Mary A. 58 

Mehitable 113 

Nancy 90 

Noah 60 

Olive 65, 108 

Olive J. 91 

Rebecca 88 

Rhoda 64 

Samuel 34 

Sarah 37 

Sarah E. 84 

Simeon 57 

Simon 34, 91 

Sophia 68 

Stephen 34 

Temperance 72 

William M. 27, 122 

Endicott, John . 125 

England, 3, 13, 18, 47, 56 

106, i 15, 132a, 160a 

195, 207. 

Estes, Anna 94 

Charles W. 94 

Etherington, Mary 147 

Evans, Eliza B. 95 

Everett, 141, Martha 149 

William, 123a, 135 

138, 144 

Everett Inn 123a 

Everett, Mass. 97 
Exeter, N. H. 4, 11, 180a 

Eyre, Eliezer 204 

Fairfield, Jonn 38 

Fall, Martha D. 81 

Fall River 27, 122 

Farm Dennett 143 

Oak Point 141 

Farmer, Moses G. 49a, 77 

Farmington, 59 



xin. 



Farr, 


Ne 


Hie J. 


92 


Fernald continued, — 




Farra 


gut 


, Adm. 


7 


Henry W. 




Far well, 


Louis J. 


89 


1, 26 


, 121a 


Fay ban, 


Hester A. 


214 


Ida B. 


120 


Fergi 


json, Ann 


60 


James 


34 


i 




Benjamin 


67 


John 


16, 67 






Betsey 63 


. 71 


John E. 


9i 


r 




Dennis 


7i 


John H. 


67 


• 




Dorcas 


57 


John L. 


211 


: 




James 


34 


Julia A. 


89 


i 




John H. 


69 


Lucy 


63 


I 




Lizzie M. 


214 


Lydia H. 


69 




Lucy M. 


87 


Margaret A. 


85 


1 




Mary C. 


67 


Maria 


79 


I 




Miriam 


216 


Mark 


42 


| 

I 




Nathan 


60 


Martha 


30, 60 






Patience 


67 


Martha T. 


94 


>' 




Sally 


61 


Mary 


60, 76 






Sarah H. 


88 


Mary A. 


67 


I 
I 




Shuah 


60 


Mary H. 


85 


: 




Stephen 


89 


Mary 0. 


211 






Sylvester 


81 


Mehitable 


65 


1 




Timothy 


78 


Miriam 


62 


Fern 

i 


aid, 


Abigail 


9* 


Molly 


215 




Albert A. 


93 


Myra H. 


93 


■ 
i 




Andrew P. 30a 86 


Nellie B. 


211 






Ann E. 


63 


Olive 


74 


I 




Ann M. 


68 


Parker 


69 






Arazena H. 


9' 


Polly 


67 






Augustus 


84 


Reginald 5, 


17, 208 


r 




Betsey 


62 


Robert D. 


94 




Carrie B. 


211 


Sally 


66 


i 




Charles 


60 


Sarah 


76 


> 




Charles W. 


88 


Sarah A. 66 


67, 84 






Cyrus 


74 


Sarah A. E. 


77 


i 




Dennis 


34 


Theodore 


89 


1 




Edwin H. 


211 


Thomas 


208 


\ 




Elizabeth A. 


7i 


Tobias 


63 






Elvena J. 


96 


Wentworth 


62 


i 




Emma I. 


93 


William 66 


70, 76 


f. 




Frank L. 


86 


William D. 


65 


t 




George A. 


95 


William P. 


211 


. 




George W. 


79 


Ficket, Molly 


37 






Grace G. 


95 


Fisher, John 


218 



XIV. 



yo 

94 
65 
66 



Ferry, Cold Harbor 

137, 144, 149 

Gunnison's 140 

Knight's 123, 138 

Morrell's 137 

Portsmouth 4 

River 150 

Spinney's 144 

Trickey's 138 

Yoik 182 
Landing 38 137 

Field, Alzira 79 

Hirarn 70, 81 

James 77, 80 

John 6s. 70 
Louisa 
Mary A. 
Miriam 
Sirena 

Fiteh, Ferris 68 

Fletcher, John J. 214 

Margaret A. 214 

Flint, Isaac 87 

Floyd, Elizabeth 216 

James 216 

Sarah E. 215 

Fogg, — 30, 31. 

Anna 35a 

Anne 56 

Ann M. 71 

Betsey 37 

Betsey D. 62 
Daniel 35a, 48, 56 

Dorcas 37a 

Edmund 35a 

Elizabeth 36 

Enoch 36 

Esther 35a 

George 37a 

Hannah 35 

Jeremy 36a 

John 33, 102 

Katherine* 68 

Keturah 35 

Lois 36a 

Margaret 34 



Fogg continued, — 

Martha 38 

Mary 33a, 58, 102 

Miriam 64 

Molly 37 

Paulina H. 80, 102 

Rachel 36a 

Reuben 35 

Rhoda 36a 

Samuel 35a 

Sarah 36a 

William 62 75 78 112 

Folsom, A. A. 2 

Fort Constitution 119, 170 

Frank's Fort 29 56 136 140 

Fort Mary 40 

Watt's Fort 29, 123, 136, 144 

Fort William & Mary 6 

Foss, Carrie B. 211 

Hannah 108 

Lillian 212 

Foster, Abigail 57, 72 

Anne yi 

Annie B. 97 

Charles W. 84 

Hannah R. 213 

John 34 

Lavinia 104 

Lois 66 

Mary 108 

Mary P. 79 

Nathaniel 108 

Olive A. 66 

Parker 65, 68 

Sally 65 

Simon 78 

William D. 213 

Foye, Adaliue M. 89 

France 196 

Freeman, Almira 68 

Benjamin ma 

Elizabeth 72 

Olive E. 73 

Frisbee, John 61, Mary 86 

Oliver L. 2, 27 

Sally 61 



XV. 



Frost, 



Addie F. 


9i 


Fry, 


Abigail T. 




63 


Alma 


164 




Adrian 




133 


Alma-J. 


97 




Amaretta. T, 




84 


Benjamin P. 


9 




Ann A. 




90 


Betsey 


57. * l6 




Ebenezer 


61, 


67 


Caleb S. 


72 




Elizabeth 




67 


Carrie B. 


104 




Honora 




61 


Char.es 29, 4 


3« 57« 




James P. 




63 


127a, 133, 


136, 188 




Joshua L. 




89 


Dependence 


62 




Lydia 




67 


Dorcas B. 


78 




Louisa J, 




69 


Dorcas T. 


2F3 




Mary 


59. 


108 


Edith M. 


95 




Mary A. 




92 


Elisha W. 


80 




Ivlehitable 




69 


Eliza A. 


68 




Nancy 


69 


. 73 


Elizabeth 


68 




Paulina H. 




62 


Francis 


74 




Sarah 




70 


Frank G. 


95 




Susan 




58 


Fred J. 


97 




William 


69 


. 77 


Hannah 


62 


Fryc 


*r Nathaniel 55, 


112, 


142 


Harrison, T. 


91 


Fural, Thomas 




208 


Ida M. 


96 


Fnrber, Nicholas P. 




82 


Isaac 70, Jane 61, 69 


Furbish, Daniel 


63 


> 83 


Jemima L. 


62 




Daniel W. 




95 


Joseph 


57. 216 




David 


34. 


216 


Joseph D. 


79 




Elizabeth 




216 


John 


69, 116 




Frederick 


W. 




John D. 


87 






93. 


121 


Joshua 


89 




Hannah 




62 


Katherine 


108 




Hattie 




95 


Louisa 


79 




Howard B 




96 


Lucy M. 


90 




Joseph 




79 


Lula D. 


95 




Lucy S. 




63 


Mary- 


216 




Mabel C. 




96 


Mary E. 


95 




Mary 




82 


Mary J. 


59 




Mary A. 




81 


Moses A. 


138 




Phebe 




58 


Nathaniel 


62, 91 




Sarah 




65 


Nicholas 120, 


128 I39 




Sarah L. 




93 


Octavia 


86, 214 


Gal 


i, Charles B. 




97 


Sally 


59. 62 




Nellie M. 




97 


Sarah 


57 


Gammon, Mabel G 




211 


Sarah A. 


92 


Gardner, H. 




204 


Sarah C. 69 S 


usan 85 




John 




n 


Susanna 


64 




Mary 




117 


William E. 


104 




Mary H. 




72 



XVI. 



Garland, Abigail 38 

Mary A. 214 

Olive 216 

William 216 

WinsIowO. 85 214 

Garrison, Emery 138 

Cutts 136 

Hammond 137 146 

Hubbard 138 

Lord 149 

Nason 150 

Sligo 150 

Wilson 145 

Garvin, Paul 71 

Gayting Elizabeth F. 214 

Gee, Henry, Ralph 208 

Gentliuer, Eliza O. 94 

George A. 94 

George, Abigail P. . 102 

Lena V. 104 

Gerry, Elbridge ma 

E. 304 

James H. 84 

Gettysburg 7 

Gerrish, Benjamin 216 

Miriam 216 

Jane 50 

John, Mary 75 

Moses 50 

Gibbons, Ambrose 5, 134 

157, 199, 20S 

Gibson, John 107 

Gilbert, Humphrey 194 

Gilman, Elisha, Laura 61 

Gilmanton, N. H. 1 1 

Gloucester 119, 219 

Goddard, John 208 

Godell, N. C. 205 

Godfrey, Edward 124a 

GofL Ellery L. 122 

Goodwin, — 31 

Abigail 58, 74, 75 

Abigail A. 212 



Goodwin, continued, — * 

Addie W. 96 

Ann 90 

Anna 213 

Asa 70, Betsey 61 
Caroline A. 113 
Charles 75 

Charles C. 78 

Daniel 34, 70, 88 
Dorcas 58 

Elisha 105 

Elma J. 97 

Gertie H: 96 

Hannah K. S3 

Ichabod 33 

Ivory 70 

James 74 

Jane 69 

Jeremiah L. 62 
Jeremiah P. 84, 90 
John 64 

Margaret 38, 73 
Mark F. 78 

Mary 71 

Mary A. 78 

Mary E. 64 

Mary H. 212 

Mary L. 92 

Morris 58 

Moses 30, 38, 73 77 
Moses E. 30, 92 
Nathan L. 71 

Nathan'l 69, 113 
Nath'lH. 212 

Nellie A. 91 

Olive 57 

Polly 212 

Rosan 64 

Rosanna 60 

Susan A. 85 

William 209 

Martha A. 79 

Gorgeana 123a 

Goodsoe, Margery 212 



j 



xvu. 



, 



Ooodsoe, Martha A. 




79 


Great Falls 79, 82 


, 83 


^85 


Gorges, Fcrdinando 








89. 93 






4, 40, 123a, 1 


53> 


144 


Great Works 9, 


145, 


15S 


i57a, 194 






Greely, Gorham 




107 


Robert S 


170 


Gr 


een, Anne 




193 


Thomas 




133 




Charles 




76 


Gosnold 




40 




Daniel 




56 


Gosport 11 


9. 1 


5ia 




Edward 




193 


Goss, Jane 




8a 




John . 128, 


140, 


147 


Gould, Abigail 74, 


84, 


215 




Martha A. 




78 


B. A. 




54 




Mary 




61 


Betsey 




66 




JNTeheniiah 




76 


Daniel 




34 




Octavia G. 




84 


Elvira M. 




104 




Sarah 




76 


Henry C. 




10 j. 




Sarah A. 




76 


Hiram 




69 




Stephen 


61 


, 83 


Joseph 65 


, 6t 


>» 74 


Greenacre 32a, 3S 


I 52 


147 


Mary 




216 


Greenhalyh, Thorn; 


is 


106 


Nathan 




120 


Greenland 46, 93, 


t6i, 


195 


Olivia B. 




211 


Griffin, Abigail 




113 


Rosanna 




65 




Abbie G. 




97 


Sarah M. 




104 




Bartlett 




113 


Theodosia 




62 




Caroline 




113 


William 




34 




lone 




113 


Go wen, Asa 70, Ma 


bel 


96 




James 




97 


Grace, Sarah E. 




90 




John H. 




113 


Grafton, Joshua 




68 




John M. 




97 


Graham, Jane 




69 


G 


riffith, G. 




204 


Grant, Esther E. 




118 


G 


rover, Dorcas 




58 


Flora E. 




118 




Edna 




65 


Florence 




45- 




Elisha 




70 


John 




45 




Joseph 




58 


Joseph L. 




81 




Eaban A. 




88 


Joseph S. 




87 




Louisa 




7i 


Lucv J. 




86 




Olive 




65 


Mabel C. 




96 




Samuel 


• 


7i 


Oliver 




70 




Sarah J. 




77 


Oliver R. 7 


27. 


121 


G 


uild, 




r 7 8 


Sarah L,. 




93 


G 


unnison, Hugh 


128, 


140a 


U. S. 




217 






150 




Gravelly Ridge 




16 




Mattie A. 




95 


Graves, Horace 




93 




Sarah 




140a 


Joseph 




82 


G 


uptill, Annie J. 




92 


Phebe 




89 




Arianna 


M. 


9 1 


Cray, Sargent S. 




107 




Emma E. 


F. 


94 



XV111. 



Guptill continued : 

Harriet N. 




Hammond continued ; 


* 


93 


Elizabeth H 


62 


L3'dia 


115a 


Emily 


88. 


Mary A. 


117 


George A. 


73 


Haggins, Edmund 


66 


George C. 


95 


Mary A. 


66 


Henry C. 


90 


Hale, Edward E. 


54 


Jane 


64 


Nathan 
William 


50 


John 


69 


119a 


Jonathan 


63 


Haley, Andrew 


146 


Joseph 55a, 


62, 76 


Deborah 


146 


I3L 136, 137, 147 


John B.- 


59 


Julia F. 


69 


Sally 


59 


Katherine 


61 


Hall, George T. L. 


215 


Laura 


61 


John 


146 


Lucy A. 


65 


Joseph 


132 


Mary 47, 


63, 72 


Mary L, 


215 


Mary A. 


87 


Sophia 


120 


Mary B. 


60 


Hallowell 


72, 101 


Mary F. 


4i 


Ham, Alberta N. 


98 


Mary L. 


98 


Carrie E. 


102 


Mary W. 


59 


Ellen J. 


T02 


Moses 


65 


Freeman C. 


102 


Myra 


47 


George A. 


92 


Oren B. 


9i 


Hall 


65 


Pierpont 


88 


Robert 


62 


Rebecca 


138 


Samuel B. 


84 


Rosan 


64 


Sarah 


65 


Sally 62, 215 


Theodosia 


62 


Sally J. 


60 


Hamilton, Eliza 


62 


Sarah 58, 


63, 76 


Mary A. 


66, 80 


Sarah E. 


89 


Samuel L. 


2a, 27 


Sarah F. 


86 


Hammond, 30, 


3*» 32 


Susan 


47 


Abigail 


216 


Thomas 34, 


47.- 6 4 


Abigail T. 


70 


79 


'] 


Albion % 


i*3 


William 63 


. 67,75 


Aravesta 


86 


William H 


7o 


Augusta 


95 


Hampton 47, 132a, 1 


54. I61 


Caroline] 


66 


Hanscom, 


30, 38 


Christophe 


-r 34 


Abigail 57 


58, 6: 


Daniel 


85. 92 


Adaline P. 


79 


Daniei R. 


60 


Alpheus 


61 


Elisha 


7i 


Ann 62, A 


nne 56 


Eliza 


64 


Annie E 


57 


Elizabeth 


85 


Apphia 


57 







xix. 


. 




Hanscom 


continued : 




Hanscom continued: 


' 




Betsey 60 


,62 




Mary 


36, 69 




Charles F. 


33 




Mary E. 


. 96 




Cynthia E. 


83 




Mary J. 


70 




Daniel G. 


80 




Melville 


85 




Edward E. 


95. 




Michael 


210 




Elisha 


35 




Miriam 


61 




Eliza J. 


8r ! 




Moses 5 


5a, 114 




Elizabeth 64, 6S 66 




Nancy 


62 




Elizabeth F 


79 




Nath'l 59, 6 


1 62 79 




Elizabeth P.- 


80 




Olive 


69 




Elizabeth S. 


91 




Olive A. 


01, 78 




Elizabeth W. 


67 




Oliver 


61 




Ellen 


87 




Pierpont 


81 




Elvena J. 


96 




Sally 


53, 67 




Emma 


97 




Samuel 32, 


55^, 62 




Esther 


56 




64, 1 


08, 114 




Eunice 


66 




Sarah A. 66 


. 67,71 




Frances J. 


81 




Sarah L. 


93 




George 


35 




Sarah M. 


82 




Hannah 56 


. 63 




Simon 


81 




Harriet C. Si, 


109 




Stephen 58 


69, 81 




Honora 


61 




Susan 


72 




Isabel S. 


214 




Susan A. 


78, 89 




Isaiah 


69 




Sylvester 


82 




Jacob S. 


93 




Thankful 


69 




James 61 


73 




Thomas 55a 57 112 




James A. 


96 




Tobias 


55 




Jerusha 


62 




William 62 66 7182 




Joanna 


6r 




William L- 


33 




Job 


55 


Hanson, 


Hannah, 


58 




Joel 


68 




William 


58 




John 


62 


Harbor, 


Boston 


162a 




John E. 


96 




Brave Boat, 


131a 




Johu P. 


73 




1 


42, 150 




John R. 66, 


35 




Centre 


27, 121 




Jonathan 


61 




Cold 1 


36, 146 




Julia 


74 




Little 


162a 




Justin 


82 




Pascataway 


170a 




Katherine 


61 




Shelburne 


218 




Keturah 


35 


Hardison, Dorcas J. 


212 




Eucy 


67 


Hardon 


, Henry W. 


2, 27 




Lydia 


108 


Hardwick, Abbie 


103 




Lydia M. 


79 


Harriman, Jessie 


74. io 7 




Maria 


62 


Hartford 


81 



XX. 



Harrington, George W. 215 

James 107 
Sarah E. 215 
Hasieton, Clarissa J. 87 

Hasty, Hannah 55 

William 35 

Hastings, Horace L. 42 

Hatch, Alvra 107 

Myrick L. 90 

Haven, Charlotte M. 207 

Eliza A. 207 

Haverhill 136 

Hawes, Josiah F. 67 

Hawthorne, William 125a 

Hayes, Joseph W. 211 

Olivia E. 211 
Hazlett, Charles A. 27, 121 

Heard, James 150 
John, 123, 136, 139 
144, 146, 150 

Phebe 144 

Hendrick, James 79 

Henry VIII 195 

Hendry, Robert 77 

Hersum, Mary 77 

Hervel, Sally 59 
Heskins, Nicholas 55, 112 

Hibbard, Jennie S. 96 

Hill, Albert L. 43 

Asa A. 73 

Betsey D. 62 

Charles C. 95 

Daniel A. 83 

Eliza 64 

Elizabeth 70 

Hannah 57 

Honora 61 

James 215 

John 34 40 

John R. 61 

Joseph 64 

Lizzie J. 93 

Lizzie R. 96 

Martha E. 72 



Hill continued: 


- 


Mat tie A. 


95 


Mary E. 


64 


Sally 


215 


Samuel 


40 


Sarah A. 


77 


Sarah W. 


80 


William 


80, 96 


The hills: 




Frost's 


133 


Great 


13S 


Kent's 


219 


Sandy 


141 



Hilliard, Pamelia S. 80 

Hillsboro 104 
Hilton, Edward 160a 
William 140, 148 
181a 

Hitchins, Priscilla 102 

Hobbs, J. W. 27 

William L. 96 

Hobby, Charles 201 

John 201 

Hodges, Lydia 101 

Hodgdon, David L. 85 

Frank P. 96 

Freeman 78 

Mary E. 95 

Sarah L. 93 

William 95 

Hodgkins, Elizabeth ior 

Hodsdon, Alice 116 

Benjamin 34 

Charles 57 

Harriet 57 

Maria 213 

Samuel 116 

Sophia 59 

William 213 

Hoey, Clara L. 104 

John 103 

Ruth E. 103 

Hole, Elizabeth 9a 

John 10 



XXI. 



Holmes, Ellen P. 


89 


Indians 3a, 18, 28, 


81, 39a 


Sarah C. 
Holman, S. 
Hook, Francis 
Hooper, Josiah 78, 


87 


^34. 136, i37> 139. 


110a 


142, 144, 149, 150 


40 


169a, 194, 2 


20 


109a 


Ipswich 


47 


Sylvester 


112 


Ipswich, England 


150 


Hotel Chapernown 


2a 


Ireland 


6, 9 


Hotel Curtis 


119 


Ireland, George E. 


97 


Hotel Wentworth 


164 


Laura A. 


97 


Houghfon, Charles H. 


122 


Iron Works 


9 


House, Dennett 


14 


Isham, Harriet N. 


93 


Dover Point 


182 


John M. 


93 


Great 


134 


Island, Badger's 


38, 219 


Manor 


10 


Boon 


21 


Meeting 


135 


Fernald's 


5 


Thompson 


159 


Great 


55.-1*3 


Wentworth 


176 


Hebrides 


195a 


Whipple 


145 


Long 


56 


Hoyt, Cynthia H. 


93 


Newcastle 


172 


Jackson M. 


93 


Noble's 


219 


Hubbard, Abigail 


216 


Noddle's 


i45 


James 


53 


Prince Edwa 


rd's 219 


Joshua 


98 


Richmond's 


40, 177 


Mary 


68 


Seavey's 


120 


Philip 


138 


Seavey's 


120 


Sally 
Sarah 


58 


Smith's 


172 


72 


Star 


121a 


Sebastian 
William 


68 


Thompson, s 


162a 


169a 


Isles of Scotland 


197 


Hull, Joan 133, Jose] 


?h 133 


Isles of Shoals 120, 


123, 132 


Humphreys, Daniel 


220 


145, 


I5L 179 


Hunt, Monroe 


113 




193 


Huntress, Betsey W. 


73 


Trevore 


174 


Izette 


213 


Wight 


19 


Marshall 


143 


Jackson, Abraham 


66 


Mary R. 


96 


John 


10, 48 


. William 79, 213 


Margaret 


10 


Hurd, Thomas 


208 


Maria 


9i 


Hussey, Joseph 


57 


Olive 


66 


Nancy 


57 


Richard 


16 


Hutchins 


120 


Thomas M. 1, 26 


Mary J. 


64 


William 


85 


Remington 


64 


James, Alexander 


135 


Samuel 


56 


Hugh 208, S 


>usan 67 



xxn. 



Jeffries, William 
Jellison, Sarah M. 
Jenkins, Eunice K. 
Henry M. 
Ichabod 
James 
James G. 
Lydia 
Mary A. 
Obadiah 
Olive A. 
Reginald 
Stephen 
Jenness, John S. 
Jersey City 
Jessup, *\nnie 
Jobs 

Johnson, Carrie E. 
Edward 
James 
Joseph 
Lydia 
Sarah 
Sarah J. 
Susan 
Johnston, James J. 
Jelley, Mary A. 
Jones, Alexander 
Carrie B. 
Charles B. 
Frank 
. Harriette E. 
Hannah M. 
James A. 
John 

John Paul 
Mary A. 
Oliver A. 
' Sarah 

Thomas i 
William 
William O. 
Jones' Wharf 
Jordah, Andrew 
Ruth E. 



188 


Jordar 


i, Abigail . 62 


79 




Joseph 216 


63 




Mary 216 


80 




Ralph 62 


63 


Josely 


a, Henry 40, 199, 20S 


70 


Junkins, Alexander 46, 10S 


75. 77 




Ann M. 78 


75 




Elizabeth L. 46 10S 


72 




Hannah 65 


75 




Laura A. 97 


108 




Lizzie J. 93 


128, 144. 




Mary L. 98 


218 




Nathan 65 


207 




Victor P. 93 


94 




William 0. 9$ 


97 


Keatin 


g, Miranda 59 


158a 




Richard 59 


95 


Keen, 


Elizabeth J. 79 


125 


Keinear, Lydia A. 80 


20S 


Kelley 


, Sarah 140 


34 


Kenda 


1, Richard 48 


214 


Kenna 


rd, Benjamin 32 


57 




Dorcas 61 


72 




Elizabeth 68, 84 


73 




Ella M. 94 


84 




Ellen A. 213 


7* 




Emily F. 86, 214 


208 




Frank E. 94 


90 




Joseph F. 213 


90 




Lizzie M. 91, 214 


44 




Lydia 58, 66 


122 




Margery 57 


84 




Mary 58, S 7 


88 




Miriam 64 


72 




Nathaniel 64 


6 




Samuel ^S 


67 




William 57 


67 




William L. 68 


69, 148a 


Kenne 


bunk, 


28, 144a 




43, 47, 78, 219 


32 


Kenne 


bunkport 62 


90 


Kenne 


y, Hannah ' 64 


■! 144 




Joshua W 64 


104 






103a 







XXtll. 



Keunison.-ston, — 




Knight, continued : 




Ami M. 


82 


Thomas, 56, 64, 


114 


Eugene W i 


07 111a 


Timothy 66, 


220 


Hugh 


5S 


William W. 


97 


Joseph 


82 


Knowlton, Addie W. 


96 


Joseph L. 


87 


Hannah 


64 


Mary 


74 


Isabel 62 


, 81 


Mary P. 


63 


James 


62 


Samuel 


63 


James H. 


'84 


Sarah 


58, 62 


Jeremiah, 


82 


Kimball, Benj. P. M 


214 


John 


32 


Cynthia H. 


93 


Joseph 


85 


Ivory 


73. 74 


Lucy 


59 


James H. 


92 


Nathaniel 


96 


R. H. 


112 


Sally 


77 


Ruth A. 


214 


Sarah E. 


90 


Sarah D. 


78 


Knox, Andrew 


197 


King, Albert J. 


96 


Laconia J 59a, 


181 


Charles 


197a 


Ladd, Alexander 


207 


Elizabeth 


80 


Lake Champlain 


159 


James 157, 197a 


Great 


204 


Mary L. 


96 


LaMerry 


219 


William 


148 


Lamson, Albert H. 




King's Lynn 


192a 


ta, 26, 


121a 


Kitigston, N. H. 


20 


Landing 


149 


Kinin, Juliette 


93 


Lane, Sampson 


208 


Kirk, David 


204 


Sarah P. 


87 


Kitterage, Sarah C. 


66 


Lang, Charles H. 


81 


Knight, Abbie M. 


95 


Langdon, John 


7 


Albert J. 


42, 85 


Langley, John 


66 


Clarissa 


65 


Sally 


70 


Daniel 


62 


Sirena 


66 


Emma J 


97 


Langton, Carrie L. 


97 


Frank F. 


95 


Elmer E. 


97 


John W. 


87 


Huldah 


66 


Lula L. 


97 


Paschal M. 


88 


Lydia 


64 


Lapham, John B. 95, 


107 


Mark 


78, 94 


Larder, John 


14S 


Mary A. 66, 


94, 220 


Larribee, Oriville L- 


81 


Nancy 


62 


Lawrence, 96, 97 


Roger 


208 


Leach, Ada S. 


98 


Sally 


58 


Almira 


89 


Sarah A. 


220 


Amanda 


■ 89 


Sarah T. 


89 


Caroline 


81 


Thaddeus 


42, 91 


George E. 


98 



XXIV. 



Leach , contiyi tied ; 




Leomi 


nster 


12 


George W. 


83 


Lewis 


Annie A. 


9i 


Mabel G. 


99 




Enoch 


77 


Margaret 


84 




John 


79 


Martha A. 


81 




Julia A. 


81, 89 


Maurice S. 


99 




Mark F. 


273 


Olive A. 


66, 78 




Julia A. 


8i, 89 


Pisidia 


74 




Mark F. 


73 


. Shuah 


66 




Thomas 


188 


Washington 


66 


Lewiston 


83 


Leader, Anne 


10 


Lexin 


gton 


67 


Elizabeth 


9 


Libbey 


30 


George 9, 1 


28, 145 




Abigail 


66 


Richard 


9a, 124 




Albert E. 


102 


Leavitt, Christopher 


170a 




Albert W. 


89, 102 


Washington 


72 




Alexander 


7' 


Lebanon 61, 67, 98, 102a 




Alice 


6c 


Lee, N. H. 


66 




Anna 


. 35, 216 


Legislature 4a, 20, 


35, 217 




Anthony 


48 


Leighton, 29, 30. 3*> 


56, 114 




Asa 


76 


Abigail 


62 




Azariah 


215 


Andrew 


3i) 69 




David 


56 


- Betsey 


63 




Elisha 


35 


Edgar A. 


120 




Elizabeth 


215a 


Eliza J. 


74 




Esther 


35, 56 


Elizabeth 


74 




Fanny Y. 


95 


George W 


. 2:4 




Frances 


66 


Hannah 


57, 64 




George 


76 


Hattie E. 


92 




George W. 


9i 


Isabel S. 


214 




Hammond 


7r 


James 62 


62 




Isaac 


68, 138 


Jane 


62 




Jane 


66 


John 


34. 145 




Jane H. 


70 


John W. 


84 




Jeremiah 


69 


Jonathan 


58 84 




John 


35 


Lucy M. 


78 




Joseph W. 


89 


Margery 


57 




Lydia 


ii5. 215 


Mary 


61, 216 




Mary 


60, 76 


Mary A. 


68, 83 




Mary A. 


87, 9i 


Miriam 


80 




Mary E. 


102 


Oliver T. 


74 




Mary J. 


67 


Sally 


58, 59 




Matthew- 


215 


Sarah H. 


m 




Moses 


74 


Sophia 


58 




Nathan 


34 


Thomas 


120 




Pisidia 


74 


William 


34 iss 




Rachel 


65 



XXV. 



Libbey, continued : 






Louis IX 


18 


Sarah 


63 


, 85 


Love — 


155 


Sophia 




59 


Lovett, Jeremiah, Sally 


58 


Thomas 


59 


,63 


Lovell, Mary A. 


212 


Library 


3i. 


136 


Lovewell, Alpheus 


107 


Limington 


81, 


216 


Lowe, Abigail 


215 


Lincoln, A. 




217 


Gilbert I. 


107 


Lind, Jenny 




32a 


Nathaniel 


215 


Linscot, Mary 




212 


Lundy, Elisabeth 


215 


Linscot. Mary C 




70 


John 64, 77, 8c 


>, 83 


Little, George M, 




43 


Mary 


64 


Littlefield, John L. 




90 


Lunt, Abram R. 1 


09a 


Liverpool 




32a 


Lusher, EClea 


186 


Lougee, Nehemiah 




90 


Lydston, Almira 


68 , 


Locke, Edna 




95 


Daniel 


68 


James W. 




120 


Gideon 


34 


John 




I20 


John 


77 


Thomas 




65 


Margaret A. 


214 


Lockport 




87 


Mary M. . 


88 


Lombard. Dorcas 




37 


Lygonia 


123 


London, 9, 31, 40, 


50, 


116 


Lyman, Maine, 18 


. 95 


133, 165a, 


194. 




Lynch, Julia 


103 . 


Long Reach, 


136, 


*43 


Mary B. 


103 


Longstaff, Henry 




208 


William A. 


103 


Lord, Abigail 




62 


Lynn, Henry, Sarah 


140 


Albert 




95 


Lynn, Jlass. 




Daniel 




73 


9, 54, -8o, 102, 


T *? f 


David 




34 


Machias 


36 


Elvira J. ' 




81 


Macomber, Horatio N. 


107 


Frances 




80 


Madbury, N. H. 


216 


Hannah W. 




78 


Maddox, Martha A. 


82 


Judith 


t35> 


169 


Madison, Ct. 


82 


Louisa 




66 


Maffitt, John N. 


106 


Lucy A. 




94 


Maine, 20, 2S, 119a, 137 




Lydia 




63 


158a, 217a. 




Martha 


55> 


149 


Maiden, 85, 94 




Martha J. 




95 


Mandal, William H. 


84 


Mary A. 




88 


Manges, Eliza B. 


95 


Mary M. 




73 


John W. 


95 


Mehitable 




65 


Manning, Joseph R. 


9i 


N. 




53 


Nancy S. 


213 


Nathan 120, 


128, 


135 


William A. 


213 


138 






Mansion, Pepperell 


22 


Oliver 




7i 


Sparhawk 


22 


Susan A.' 




89 


Manson, Dorothy 


94 


William 




74 


Eliza J. 33, 


213 


Louisburg 




6 


Emma J. 


97 



Manson, continued : 


3 


Frances E. 


82 


Hannah 


65 


Henry B. 
Horace L. 


65 


97 


Lois B. 


94 


Lorenzo D. 


84 


Margaret 


65 


Olive 


74 


Timothy 


65. 94 


Marblehead 


95 


March, Guy G. 


96 


Mabel 


96 


Mariana 
Marriner, Hannah 


'57 


61 


Marsh, Anna 


59 


Marshall, W. F. 


ri2 


Marston, James 


110a 


Susan L. 


104 


Martin, Anna T. 


85 


Anthony 


72 


Elmira E. 


96 


Hannah 


85 


Isaac 


84 


Katherine 


65 



XXVI. 



Martha ■ 65 

Mary A. 84 

Robert 65 

Roxanna 96 

Samuel 84 

Mason, Ann 181, 193 

Dorothy . 192 

Isabella 195 

John 4, 8, 119, 113a 

145, 157a, 192a 

207, 208 

Miles 192 

Sarah 192 

Robert 176 

William 192 

Masonia 161, 205 

Massachusetts 4, 40, 53, 

119a, 132a 

161, 210 

Massure, Francis 74, 75, 107 

Mather 151 



Mathes, Ellen T. ^ 212 

John H. 212 

Mattone, Hubert 128, 148a 

. Robert 17 

Sarah 148a 

Matthews, Francis 208 

John 72 

Maverick, Amias 174 
Antipas 128, 135 
150 

John 145 

Katherine 150 
Samuel 145, 174 

McDermot Julia 103 

McDoaald, Annie 98 

McDuffee, Dorcas J. 212 

Jonas 212 
Mclntire, Clarissa jX\ 84 

Dorcas 212 

George 75 

Hannah 57 

John 212 

Lucy 65 

Rhoda 74 

Sally 81 

Sarah 1:3 

5yivester 74 

William 57 

McKay, Donald 219 

McKenney, E. H. 110a 

Nathan 71 

McKindey, Annie B. 27 

Walter D 122 

Medcalf, Alfred 60 

Meloon, Henry, Mary 63 

Melrose 8^ 

Mendum, Hannah 216 
Robert, 

128a, 136, 140 

Mercer, Francis n 

Meriden, N. H. 81 

Merrill, Anna 219 

Hannah, John 57 

Joseph 137 

Stephen 67 

William 6, 213 



XXV11. 



Merritt, John 


144 


Morton, George 


122 


Merrow, David VV. 


95 




Thomas 


177a 


Laura E. 


95 


Moses 


Hannah 


12 


Merry Mount 


189a 




John M. 1 a, 


26, 121 


Meserve, Mary H. 


69 




Joseph 


11a 


Mestinez, Anna, 


104 




Josiah, Samuel 12 


William 


G. 104 




Theodore, Tho 


mas 12 


Mexico 


103 




Thomas P. 


T2 


Milbuiy 


82 


Moultou, Adaline S. 


70 


Miles, Harriet A. 


213 




Judith 


46 


Joseph 


128, 148 


Mugford, Caleb 


107 


Lucy 


134 


Munger, Hiram 


41 


Thomas 


i34 


Munse 


11, Robert 


164 


Milford 


92, 103 


Murphy, Fidelia S. 


89. 


Militia 4, 38, 139 


, 142, 147 


Nash, 


Isaac 


138 


Mill, Great Works 


143 


Nashua 


35 


Mill, Mason's 


143 


Nasorj 


, Apphia 


57 


Miller, Bridget, Jo 


seph 10 




Baker 


149 


Mar 


jaret 10 




Benjamin 


149 


Mihon 


61, 68 




Caroline D. 


* 73 


Minot's Ledge 


219 




Cynthia H. 


92 


Mitchell, H. B. 


1 11a 




Hannah 


6 7> 77 


Horace, 


2a, 26 




John 


57 


John 


107, 140 




Loretta M. 


98 


Sarah 


140 




Mary 60 


■ 74» 78 


William 


H. 43 




Mehitable 


79> 213 


Monhegan 


171 




Richard 128, 


*45 ; 149 


Monmouth 


92 




Robert 


67 


Monnette, Orra E. 


122 




Sarah J. 


86 


Moody. Elizabeth 


36 




William 


81 


Mehitable 


P. 78 


Naples 


92 


Moore, Alice J. 


2a, 27, 121 


Navy , 


British 


4 


Ashael 


1 12 


Navy 


Continental 


6 


Joel 


64 


Navv 


Yard 44, 54, 8] 


, 217 


{Catherine 


108 


Heal, 


Abbie A. 


102 


Peletiah 


108 




Betsey 


6t 


Susanna 


64 




Charles 


208 


Morgan, Eliza A. 


68 




David G. 


76 


Francis, Sarah 140 




Ebenezer 


102 


Morrell, Abraham 


55 




Hannah 


60 


Jacob 


58, 76 




Lucy G. 


76 


Japhet 80 


Joel 137 




Lydia 


76, 216 


Mary 


60 




Mary 


57 


Moses 


84 




Peace 


76 


Saily 


53, 76 




Priscilla 


102 


William 


60, 76 




Richard 


61 







XXVlll. 








Neal, continued: 




New Orleans 




7 




Rose B. 


96 


New Salem 




57 




Ruth 


76 


New York 2a, 29, 32, 


54, 


121 




Stephen 6 


1, 64. 76 


Newell, Eary A. 




7o 




Walter 159a, 


197, 208 


Newt, James 




208 




Neil, Hannah J. 


117 


Nichols, Clarissa 




75 




Jennibel 


117 


Lois B. 




94 




Mark 0. 


117 


Timothy 




189 




Nelson, Agnes 


11 


Noble, Leader 




10 




Aivin 


96 


Margaret 




10 




Anna 


10 


Mary 




77 




Aphia A. 


9i 


Thomas 




10 




Charles 


it, 56 


Norfolk 


i 


92a 




Fannie 


96 


Normandy 




'*9 


( 


George H. 


7i 


Norris, Lillian G. 




98 




Jane 


10 


True L. 




98 




Joseph 


10a, 56 


Northfield 




79 




Leaner 


10 


Northwood, 77, 88, 


■85. 


121 




Lula D. 


95 


North America 




196 




Matthew 


10a 


North Berwick 47, 


74, 


212 




Richard L. 


10 


Branch Cal. 




103 




Rose B. 


96 


Norway 




195 




William 


11 


Norwood, Almeda 




83 




Newbegin, Olive A 


86 


Nowell, Albert W. 




97 




Newburyport 


64, 8S 


Lizzie M. 




97 




Newbury 50, 122, 


137, 213 


Sarah J. 




90 




Newfields, N. H. 


1 So 


Nutter, Catherine 




5§ 




Newfieid, Maine 


86 


Hannah 




61 




Newiugton, N. H. 60, 72, 


Henry 




61 




78. 79, 90, 


93. 161a 


Lois 




36 


, 


2i5 a - 




Mary A. 




86 




Newfoundland 


144a, 207 


Oakland, Cal. 




103 




Newichawannock 28a 28347 


Odeil 




113 




*34, 


136, 145 


Odiorne, Abba V. 




61 




Newmarket 


113, 215 


Daniel 




66 




Newport, England 


19 


John 




120 




Newport. R. I. 


53 


Judith 




70 




Newton, Mass. 


27, 121 


Mehitable 




65 




New Bedford 


81 


Olive 


63, 


108 




Newcastle 5a, 17, 61, 63, 65 


Placentia 




7t 


/ 




9:, 211 


Sally 




59 




New' England, 22, 


101, 127 


Sarah C. 




66 




i34> 157^, 


194a, 207 


William 




63 




New Hampshire 7, 


32, 119a 


Old Eliot 


30, 39 




123, 157a 


i 194. 207 


Old Fields 


29, 


149 




20S 


210, 217 


Old Road 




28a 




New Haven 


123 


O'Neil, Lettie M. 


27 


, 122 



XXIX. 



Ons 


tott, Daniel 




112 


Paul, continued: 


. 


Orl 


and 




93 


James K. 


96 


Ossipee 




116 


Jane 74, Jennie S. 96 


Ox 


ford, Eng. 




192 


J. Howard 


9' 


Pal 


mer. Elizabeth 




101 


John 86, Jose 


ph 59 


I 


William 




128 


Katherine 


150 


Pal 


myra 




68 


Laviuia 


59 


1 Par 


ker, Abel 




61 


Lizzie M. 


97 


i 


Horatio G. 




54 


Love 57, Li 


ticy 63 


1 
s 


Lucy 




61 


Lydia 


58, 62 




Timothy 0. 




80 


Maria 


62 


Par 


kman 




94 


■ Mary 61, 63, 


72, 106 


Par 


liament 


] 


24a 


Mary A. 


78 


Pansonage, Alice 




72 


Mary B. 


60 


Parsons, Gharles 




60 


Mary G. 


60 


1 


Hannah 




63 


Mary H. 


212 


; 


Lyman 




80 


Mary J. 


59 


( 


Martha 




60 


Mary L. 


92 




Patience 




67 


Mary P. 


66 


Partridge, Richard. 




189 


Moses 


72, 106 


Pat 


eh, George T. 




59- 


Moses N. 


138 


I 


Roxana 




96 


Olive A. 


61 




Statira 




59 


Olive J. 


85 


Patterson, H. F. A. 




112 


Oliver 


66 


Pan 


I. Abigail 63, 66, 


215 


, 216 


Pamelia 61, Sally 58 


1 


Abigail T. 74 






Samuel L. 


79 




Alte J. 




93 


Sarah A. 65 


, 91. 215 


1 


Ann P. 




77 


Sarah J. 72 


, 93, 106 


I 


Augustus 




89 


Stephen 


68, 150 


\ 


Caroline 




67 


Timothy 


215 


\ 


Caroline A. 




82 


Warrington 


77 


I ■ 


Carrie 




215 


Willard F. 


211 


1 


Charles E- 


90 


. 9i 


William J. 7 


f, 75. 85 


■ 


Clarissa 




7i 


Paul's Landing 


131 


k 


Daniel 120, 1 


28, 


131 


Payne, George M. 


42 


i 






150 


Oliver 


77, 8.8 


1 


Dorcas 58 Dru 


cill 


a 88 


Pearson, E. W. 


27 


\ 

9 


Edward K. 


83> 


148 


Peddock, Leo 


164 


212, 


215 


Pendexter, David P. 


92 




Edwin 




73 


Eunice 


92 


1 


Elizabeth 




215 


Pendleton, Brian 1 


26a, 132 




Ella B. 97 EIlaM. 


211 


Pennell, Meribae 


212 




Frank J. 63 Fred L 


•97 


Pepperell 


3 




Flavius J. 




96 


Perrin, James 


noa 




Henry M. 




89 


Perry, John J. 


75» 109 




Ida E. 




120 


Petersburg, 




1 


Ira 60, Ira S 




84 


California, 


£03 



XXX. 



Pettigrow, Abby M. 84 

Anne 216 

Arthur 62 

Lucy A. 89 

Mar}' 63 

Nancy 59, 62 

Sally 60 

SamueJ 216 

Susan 64 

Susan A. 85 

Timothy 60 

Pettingall, Miriam 102 

Peverly, Jane 9 

John 20S 

Sarah 9 

Thomas 8a 

Philadelphia 80 

Phiibrook, Eliza J. 81 

Harrison ia5 

Mary 118 

Phillips, Isaac D. 210 

Phyllis' Notch 182 

Phillipsburg 57, Phipps 5 

Pickering, Elizabeth A. 71 

Fred E. 211 

George 105 

Mary A. 67, 211 

Mary G. 60 

Washington 72 

Pierce, Adaline 77 

Daniel 108, 216 

George 58 

John 148 

Mary J. 108 

Sarah 148 

Simeon W. 107 

Susan 58 

Pierpont, Dr. 32 

Elizabeth 68 

Pike, John 220 

Sarah 116 

Piper, Mary C. 67 

Pinder, Mary A. 220 

Pirach, Bertha M. 94 

Fred W. 82 

Pittston 116 



Piscataqua 1a, 4, 6a, 23a, 

47, 119a 123, 132 

157, 161a, 198 

209 

Place, Alvin W. 95 

Carrie E. 95 

Martha A. 88, 214 

Mary E. 90 

Plaisted, Ebenezer 85 

Mary A. 21 1 

Nahum 211 

Olive 147 

Roger 146, 147 

William 69 

Plattsburg 92 

Plummer, John 14a, 216 

Lydia 14a, 216 

Plymouth, 101, 122 123a 157 

Plymouth, Eng. 163a 

Point, Birch 140, 146 

Bloody 16 

Dover 119, 157a 

Graves 16 

Hilton's 119, 157a 

Joselyn's 13S 

Kittery, 2, 27, 28, 115 

138, 140, 141 

148, 159a 211 

Leighton's 138 

Oak 141 

Odiorne's 119, 157a 

- Pipe Stave 145, 149 

Thompson's i5Sa 

Warehouse 132, iSz 

Pomeroy, Leonard 167a 

Pond, North Mill 14 

Pond, Milton 158 

Popham 1^ 

Pope. Alexander 45 

Franklin L. 53 

Porter, Ernest A. 107 

Juliette 122 

Porter, Maine, 116, 213 

Portland 59, 73, 85 

116, 120 



XXXI. 



Portsmouth 8a, 13, 24a, 32a 


Raitt 


continued: — 






4*i 45> 


58 


, 59* 60 




Maggie 0- 




95 


62, 64, 


67 


68, 70 




Mary 




74 


72,73. 


77 


» 78, 79 




Mary G. 




98 


80, 81, 


84 


, 85, 86 




Matilda C. 




96 


87, 89, 


90 


.92, 94 




Miriam 


58 


. 65 


95. 98» 


102, 109a 




Olive 




63 


132a, 147, 


i49 r 5i 




Willard E. 




98 


i59a, 


r92« 


1, 210a 




William 




79 






218 


Ralei 


gh, Walter 




194 


Post, Marshall W 


. 


82 


Rand 


, Caroline 




67 


Potter, Frank C. 




107 




Edward 




67 


Pounding, 




146 




Francis 




208 


Powers, Mary E. 




88 


Rand 


all, Antoinette 


B. 


94 


Pratt, David, 




ina, 




Benjamin 




59 


Henry 




4i 




Denton E. 




94 


Preeble, Ann 




62 




Elizabeth 


59 


, 63 


Prisoners 




12 




Katherine 




65 


Prime, Emily F. 




214 




Noah 




65 


Oliver 




86, 214 




Patience 




60 


Puritans, 8, ior, 123 


[80 195 




William 


60 


. 63 


Quakers 4, 137, 144, 1 


50. 183 


Rank 


s, Swanton 




112 


Quamphegan 2 


i, 


47, 146 


Ranlet, Jonathan 




59 


Quamphegan Fall 


s 


29. 15° 




Nancy 




59 


Quebec 




6. 204 


Rawson, Edward 




186 


Quimb\-, Maiy 




77 


Raymond, William 


- 


208 


Quint, Clarissa A. 


D. 


72 


Raymond, N. H. 




85 


Sarah 






Raynes, Francis 




81 


Racliff, Lydia 




60 


Readi 


ng, Mass. 




70 


Racley, Agnes, William :r 


Rehoboth, Mass. 




122 


Raitt, Abigail 




U3 


Remick, Abigail 




74 


xAbigail A. 




212 




Ann R. 




63 


Alexander 




77 




Annie L. M. 


94 


Anna 




59 




Betsey 




63 


Betsey 




63 




Caroline 




65 


Clementine 




80 




Charlotte 




80 


Eliza 




62 




Christian 






Eliza J. 




82 




\ . J ?> 


128, 


143 


Elizabeth 




80 




Christianna F. 


79 


George 




62 




Clarissa 




77 


G i 1 m a n 




74 




Dorcas 




61 


Isabel 




83 




Edgar W. 




94 


Henry M. 




86 




Elias 




65 


James 




105 




Elizabeth 


59. 


216 


James M. 




90 




Fred W. 




92 


Jefferson 


81, 


86, 88 




Florence A 




95 


John 




59. 63 




Granville 


A. 


no 



XXX11. 



Remick continued: 

Hannah 109 

Honora 61 

Horace 59 

Isaac 17, 58 

Isabel 63 

Isabel F. 94 

James A. D. 90, 95 
John 116, 212 

John M. 87 

John W. 88 

Joseph 87 

Josephine E. 93 
Levi 109 

Linville S. 96 

Lydia H. 85 

Mark 58 

Martha 63 

Mary 58, 64, 75 

Mary A. 8o, 88, 

2ii, 213 
Mary E. 86 

Mary J. 64 

Mary W. 59 

Meribah 212 

Miriam 58 

Molly 116 

Nancy 62 

Nettie C. 96 

Oliver P. 2a, 26, 121 
Rebecca H. 6y 

Richard J. 94 

Sally S. 60 

Samuel 79 

Samuel A. '89, 213 
Statira M. 61 

Washington 

63, 78, 109 
William 61, 72 

Renshaw, Lois B. 93 

Revolution 6, 15, 116 

Rhodes, Albert E. 27 

Rice, John 73, 74, 107 

Thomas 128, 142 

Ricker, Mary 117, Ruth 214 



Rideout, Abbie 103 

Franklin D. 103 

Franklin S. 103 

Jessie 103 

Rider, Anna M. C. 121 

Rigby 123 

Riley, Anna M. C. 27 

Ripley, Sarah 60 

Risworth, Edward 124 

River, Androscogin , 142 

Back 179 

Cocheco 165 

Fore J 79 a 

Great 134 

Great Ouse 195 

Iron 217 

Kennebec 123, 142 

158a, 194 

Kennebunk 47 

Little 134 

Merrimac 124, 158a 

198 

Newichawonock 

47. i59 a » 199 

Piscataqua 3a, 23, 28 

56, 123a, 141 158a 

193a, 2:9 

Saco 31 

Sagadahoc 47, 159 

Spurwink 47 

St. Lawrence 189a 

York 182 

Road, Cedar 139, 146 

Ferry 137 

Norton 146 

Old 28a 

River 28, 138 

Roberts, Anna 36, 91 

John T83 

Joseph 36 

Patience 57 

Samuel 57 

Thomas 182a 

Robinson, Ezekiel 107 

Rochester, N. H. 14a 





XXXlll. 




Rock, Boiling 


150 


Russell, John 


57.74 


Endicott 


425 


Mary 


74 


Plymouth 28, 


164 


Olive 


57 


Pulpit 


144 


Saiah E. 


68 


Rogers, 


31 


William 


50 


Abbie E. 


95 


Saco 22, 40, 46, 63, 


95. 122 


AbbieA. 97, 


218 


131, 134a, 144, 


179 214 


Bertha E. 


98 


Salem, 52a, 83, 92, 94, 102 


Charles W. 


84 


117, 122, 215 




Cyrus 


.76 


Salmon Falls 114, j 


[46, 147 


Dorothy 


76 


149. 




Elizabeth H. 


62 


Safford, Moses A. ia, 22, 26 


Emeretta A. 


94 


Sanborn, Lizzie 


90 


Ida A. 


93 


Lydia S. 


88, 214 


James 


65 


Sandally, Thomas 


19S 


James K. P. 97 


218 


Sanderson, Aaron 


107, 108 


John 68, 76, 83, 


220 


Sandwich 


56 


John E. 


94 


Sanford 


85 


John H. 7c 


1, 91 


Sargent, Amos 


74> ii3 


John P. 


62 


Julia 


74, 81 


John W. 


92 


William M 


201 


Mary 


47 


Saugus 


80 


MaryG. 


98 


Sawyer, Horace 


no 


Olive 


212 


Joshun 


104 


Pharez E. 


95 


Lavinia 


104 


Rachel 


65 


Susan A. 


104 


Sarah E. 


84 


Scales, John 2a, 


27, 119a 


Vienna 


93 


Scammon, Eiiot F. 


92 


Walter C. 


93 


Lois 


59 


William D. M. 


72 


Martha E 


212 


Rollins, Daniel L. 


69 


Mary E. 


74 


Romsey, England 


127 


Nicholas 


53 


Rounds, Ellen S. 


120 


Sally 


58 


Rowe, Ellen E. 
Fred H. 
Lizzie F. 
Walter W. 


93 


William 


59 


93 


Scarboro 40, 48, 77, 


IT7, 147 


97 


214. 




97 


Scotland 


197 


Rawles, " Sagamore," 




Scott, Betsey 


116 


133- 


143 


Hannah 


9i 


Rowley, Mass. 


40 


John 


198 


Roxbury, Mass. 2; 


7 » 77 


Sarah 


36 


Rue. Mary A. 


68 


Scriggins, Caroline 


60 


Thomas 


66 


Edward 


62 


Rugg, Alvah N. 


68 


Eliza A. 


64 


Olive A. 


66 


Hannah 


216 


Rye, N. H. 66, 


161a 


Lucy 


60 








xxxiv. 




Scriggins, continued: 




Shapl 


eigh, continued: 


Martha 


63 




James 34, 61, 66, 69 


Mary 


59 




James M. 86 


Nancy 


62 




James W. 61 


; William 


59 




jasper 94 


. Winthrop 
Seavey, Annie K. 


216 




Jeremiah P. 212 


120 




John 54 107 114 147 


Alniira J. 


89 




Lavia 66 


Charles W. 


S2 




Levi J. 61, 71, 212 


Dorcas 


58 




Martha 30 


Eunice 


- 66 




Martha E. 212 


Hannah 


65 




Martha J, 69 


Lucy 64, Sa 


llv 64 




Mary 17, 59, 61, 63 


Stephen 


64 




212, 216 


William £20, 208 




Mary A. 71, S2 


Salfrldge, Thomas 


54 




Mary E. 88, 90, 96 


Sewall. 


50 




Mary J. 80 


Abigail 


216 




Morris G. 89 


Emma E F. 


94 




Nathaniel 82 


Jane 


50 




Nettie H. 211 


N. Millard 


94 




Nicholas 4, '30, 55, 


Stephen 


216 




114, 124a, 132 


Shackley, Polly 


60 




135, i39» Hi 150 


Shapleigh : 






Olive 58 


Albert A. 


89 




Olive J. 80 


Alexander, 3 


a, 17 




Richard 58, 61 


120, 139 1 


4i 145 




Richard H. 82 


Alexander R 


69 




Roscoe G. 90 


Alice 


63, 142 




Sally R. 7 r 


Betsey 


57 




Samuel 34, 90 


Caroline 


65 


• 


Samuel C. 86 


Catherine S. 


92 




Sarah 60, 64, 147 


Dependence 


34- 69 




Sarah A. 80 


Elisha 30a 3334:41 




Shuah 61 


Elisabeth 


63.64 




Statira M. 61 


Elizabeth W. 


73 




Thomas 63 


Ellen J. 


89 




Tobias 57 


George O. 


9* 




William 89 


George W. 


93» 96 


Shapleigh, Maine 141 


Hannah L. 


61 


Sharpe 


i, Samuel 189 


Hannah T. 


77 


Shaw, 


Henrietta F. 97 


Harriet M. 


94 




Justin W. 27 


Herman A. 


96 




Maria 57 


Isa 96, Ivor> 


64, 72 


Sherive, Caroline 60 


Izette 


93 




Samuel 60 



XXXV. 



Sh 


-rburne, Benjamin 70 


Simonds, Almanda 


102 


. 


Henry 


8, 208 




John 128, 


148, 208 




William 


120 




Samuel 


125a 


Sherwood 


158a 




Welthea 


148 


Sherwill, Nicholas 


167 


Simpson 


110a 


Sh 


ps, &c: — 






Abigail 


58 




Alabama 


7 




Annie L. J. 


95 


■ 


Anne 


181a 




Benjamin 


73 


1 


Ann Eliza 


219 




Ebenezer 


63 


I- 


Arcade 


218a 




Evaiine 


87 




Bon Homme Richard 6 




Hannah 


58,85 


i • 


Charity 


171 




John 


64 




Constitution 


7 




Lucy 


68 


1 


Drake 


6 




Lucy E. 


89 




Dreadnought 


32 




Maria 


58 


I 


Klizabeth Hami 


Iton 32 




Martha J. 


95 


| 

£ 


Falkland 


4 




Mary 


64 


1 


Fitz E. Rigg 


219 




Samuel S. 


87 


» 


Fortune 


181 




Theophilus 


58 


Guiriere 


7 




William 


73. »o 


Harvest Home 


210 


Sinclair, Mary J. 


86 


1 


James 


137 




Mary M. 


73 




Jonathan 


163a 


Sinker 


, Thomas 


143 


i 


Kearsarge 


7 


Sise, F. M. 


27 


I 


Mayflower 


171a 


Siade, 


Dennison R. 




I 


Nightingale 


33. 33 




2a. 


27, 121a 


I 


Ocean Racer 


32 


Slaves 




115, 118 


i 


Pitd Cow 


134. 199 


Small, 


Francis 


3i 


1 


Providence 


167a 




Joshua 


216 




Ranger 


6 




Mary 


216 


Serapis 


6 


Smart, 


George J. 


64 


[ 


Swan 


171 




Mary 


• 64 


9 

1 


Typhoon 


32 


Smith 


Abigail 


75 


Warwick 1 


59a, 199 




Alexander 


7i 


William Bobson 219 




Alis L. 


104 


■ 
1 


William & Francis 132 




Bartholomew 


131 


1 Sh 


ipyard 32a 


, 38, 142 




Eunice 


61 


1 Sh 


ires, Jeremiah 


128, 148 




Frank 


104 


I Shorty, Isaiah 


67 




Jane 


74 




Jacob 


34 69 




John 40, 69 


74, ^6 




Meschach 


60 




193a 






Patience 


67 




J. W. 


94 




Polly 


60 




Lucy L. 


63 


I ^hurtltff 


174 




Mary E. 


116 


I Sias, Gertrude 


27 




Patience 


73 










William 


61 



XXXVI. 



Snow, Hester A. 
Joseph C. 

Society, Mass. Hist. 
Methodist 
Prince 

Somersworth, N. H, 
66, 63, 69, 70 
82, 83, 84, 85 

Souierville 

Sophers, Lucv 

William 

South Acton 

South Berwick 31, 47 
3*> 47, 61 
7*. 73»?8 



95, 96, Il6, I20, 

South Portland 218 
Spalding, Justin 66, 67; 
Spencer, Patience 

Thomas 

128, 133, 143, 

William 
Spinney, 30 

Ada W. 

Addie L. 

Alfred 

Alice 

iMrnira 

Ann M. 

Ann R. 

Ann W. 

Anna 

Annie 

Annie B. 

Arabella F. 

Augusta 

Aurilla M. 

Benjamin 

Bertha P. 

Caleb 

Caroline 

Catherine J. 

Charles 

Charles H. 



214 
214 

166 

105 
192a 

6, 65 

7i. 72 

120. 

93. 21 r 

60 

60 

85 
, 66 

.69 
• 93 
159 
212 



61 

66, 67 
80, 85 



107 
143 

208 
M3 



98 
95 
94 
62 

89 
84 

63. 70 

67, 72 

216 

98 

97 

94 

95 

94 

63 

211 

120 

7i 

85 

67 

90 



63 



61 



Spinney continued:— 
' Charles P 
Clara E. 
Clarissa 
Daniel P. 
David 
Edith M. 
Edward 
Eleanor 
Eliza 
Eliza O. 
Elizabeth 
Elizabeth P 
Emeretta A 
Emily A. 
Emma 
Esther 
Everett 

Fabius 
Fanny 
Frances 
Francis 
Frank A 

Fred E. 
George 

Geneva A. 

Grace G. 

Hamilton 

Henry B. 

Henry PI. 

Henry P. 

Isaac 

Isabella A. 

Izette 

Jacob R. 

James 

James H. 

Jane 

Jennie 

Jeremiah L. 

Joseph 79 

Josiah 

Leonard 

Leonora 

Lizzie M. 



63 
91 
65 
84 
69, 72 

95 
73 
68 
66 

94 

72, 83 
214 217 

94 
86 

97 

64, 66 

98 

61 

63 
214 

i 72, 90 

94 

97 

216 

95 
95 
81 
211 
214 
86 
78 
96 

79. 113 
217 

67 
86 

73, 78 
211 

72 
, 86, 109 
65 
72 
87 
95 









XXXVll. 






Spiu 


ney continued: 






Spinney continued : 


-• 




Lucinda L. 




217 




Thomas 128, 143a 




Lucy 


64 


67 




Timothy 


58 




Lyman 




69 




Vienne 


93 




Lyman P. 


90, 


214 




Wilhelmina 


N. 94 




Martia A. 




80 




Willard H 


97 




Margaret E. 




82 




William D. 


70, 78 




Maria 




83 




William M. 


213 




Mark 




66 


Spr 


mg, Alpheus 


30, 216 




Martha 




65 


Springfield 


73 




Martha A. 




88 


Spurwink 


40 




Martha J. 




83 


Squam 


154 




Mary 




63 


Squamscott 


160 




Marv A. 




82 


Squando 


142 




Mary C. 




83 


Squ 


ebbs 


164 




Mary B. 




68 


Stackpole, Elizabeth F. 90 




Mary L. 




120 




James, M 


ary 212 




Mary P. 




63 


Stacy, Ada A. 


117a 




Mary R. 




63 




Agnes 


117 




Melville S, 


._ 


95 




Alice 


ti6 




Miriam 


61 


70 




Benjamin 


115a 




Myron B. 




211 




Betsey 


116 




Nancy 




57 




Charles E. 


86, 214 




Nancy A. 




87 




Daniel 


82, 116 




Nancy H. 




7i 




Elizabeth A 


116 




Nathan 




83 




Fred 


117 




Nathaniel 




81 




Flora B. 


118 




Olive 


57 


, 60 




George 


116 




Olive E. 




90 




George E. 


i«5 




Olivia 




77 




George W. 


117 




Orinthia J. 




94 




Gilbert 


116 




Rebecca F. 




93 




Oilman 


113 




Rebecca P. 




61 




Hannah J. 


117 




Rosarina 




213 




Howard B- 


118 




Sally 


58 


69 




Ichabod 


115a 




Samuel 




57 




Izette 


93 




Samuel H. 


82 


. 85 




Joanna 


61 




Sarah 




58 




John 


72, 116a 




Sarah C. 




212 




John F. 


117 




Sarah J. 


80 


, 82 




Joseph 82, 


117, 2I 3 




Simon 




65 




Joseph W. 


118 




Simon F. 




85 




Lucy A. 


116 




Statira M. 




64 




Lydia 


115a 




Susan 




64 




Lydia A. 


77. ll 7 




Sylvester 




^3 




Mary 


117a 



XXXV111. 



7^ 



3480 



Stacy continued: — 
Mary A. 
Mary E. 
Mary H, 
Mehitable 
Molly 
Nancy S. 
Nathaniel 
Octavia 
Oliver C. 
Ralph W. 
Rosalie 
Sally 
Samuel 
Sarah 
Thomas 
Thomas C 
Viola M. 
William 

Standish, Miles 

Stan wood, J. R. 

Staples 

Abigail 
Alpheus 
Belinda 
Calvin H. 
Caroline 
Carrie E. 
Daniel 
David 
Edward 
Eleanor 
Eliakim 
Elias 

Elizabeth A. 
Elizabeth L. 
46. 
Ella M. 
Ellen A. 
Ellen T. 
Emeline 
Enoch 
Eva C. 
Frederick A. 



116, 213 
69, 116 

72 

116 

74 
116 
214 

9i 
118 
117 
216 
115a 
116 

72 

118 

115a. 

172a 

27 

30, 3^ 
216 

68 
69 

94 
72 
98 
82 

216 
62 

216 

57 
69 

87 



70 



108 
211 
215 
215 
62 
216 

95 
91 215 



Staples continued: 
George F. 
Geneva A. 
Hannah 
Hannah G. 
Harriet 
Harriet M. 
Harris 
Herman 
Isabella A. 
Jeremiah 
John 

John Colby 
John H. 
Josephine E. 
Joshua 
Julia 

Leonard C. 
Levi R. 
Louisa 
Lucretia 
Lucy 
Lydia 
Lyman 
Mabel G. 
Margaret 
Martha 
Martha A. 
Mary 



59, 



98 

95 
62 

92 
57 
94 
94 
93 
96 

75 
63, 69 
42, 72 



64, 



Mary A. 
Mary E. 
vlary J. 
Miriam 
Molly 
Nancy 
Nancy H. 
Noah 
Olive A. 
Oliver 

Peter 133, 140 
Rebecca 
Rebecca F. 
Rhoda 



»8 
93 
34 
63 
81 
90 
72 

74 
61 

69 

73 
98 

65 

63 

214 

57. 64, 68 
75. 102 
73 
9* 
73, 82 
62 



216 

57 
65 
34 
89 

78 
216 

94 
93 
64 



XXXIX. 



34 

59» 63 

88, 215 

93 
81, 215 

63, 70 

41, 87 

81 



9i 



Staples continued ; 

Robert 

Sally 

Samuel A. 

Samuel W. 

Sarah A. 

Simon 

Solomon 

Sylvester 

Thomas A. 

Thomas F. 

Vianna R. 

Wilhelmina N. 

William A. 
Stearns, George E. 
Steep Falls 
Sterling. Nettie H. 

Seth H. 
Stevens, George M. 

George S. 
Stevenson, Arthur W. 
John 
Mary L. 
Stewart, Rufus 
Stielman, Elias, Lucy 
Stimson, Charles \V. 
Stoeker. Alfred A. 27, 
Stoddard, John 

Walthea 
Stoneham 

Stonington, England 
Stoodley, Edward D. 
Elizabeth 
Frauoes 
Stoughton, Gov. 
Stover, Hannah 

Theodore 
Strafford, N H. 1, 
Stratham, N. H. 
Strawberry Bank 
Strong, Frank R. 
Strout, Geo. D. Silas P. 107 
Sullivan, John 6 

Sunday, "Capt." 31 



96 
95 
94j, 
89 
82 

1 '3 

21 f 
21 1 

87 

92 
103 
103 
103 

85 
134 

90 
121 
148 
148 
215 

19 
215 
215 
216 

136, 138 

58 

58 

I3> 27, 92 

65, 86 

I5» 159^ 

122 



Sussex, England 



19 



Swett, Mary P. P. 
William H. 
Sylvester, A. R. 
Tahanto 

Tarlton, Fannie A. C. 
Taunton, 22, 101, 

Taylor, Dr. 

Maria 
Sarah J. 
Tedder, Stephen 
Tetherly, Addie L. 

Alfred 

Ann E. 

Benjamin 

Betsey D. 

Carrie E. 

Charles 

Charles C. 

Constantia O. 

Diamond 

Elizabeth 74, 

Fanny A. 

Hannah 

Jane 

Lucy 

Lydia N. 

Martha A 

Mary E. 

Mary O. 

Mary R. 14 

Olive 

Rebecca P. 

Roxana 

Samuel 

Sarah A. 

William 
Thomas, Anna 
Thompson 

Amias 

David 158a, 

Ebenezer 

Elihu 

Hannah 

James O. 

Jane A. 



73 

73 
107 

185 

91 

21 1 

5* 
5i 

83 
208 

95 
59 
74 
74 
81 

89 
61 

95 
89 
64 

215 

92 

59 
64 
61 

74 
88 

89 
211 

73 

57 

61 

70 

57- 

74 

74 

94 

139 

163a 

200 

120 

54 

68 

110a 

S3 



xl. 



Thompson continued ; 




Trefethen, Archelaus 




63 


John i 


74a 


Mary 




63 


Joseph 61 


,65 


Trelawney, Robert 


40, 


176 


Lois 


68 


Trevett, Oliver 




58 


Sally 


67 


Sophia 




58 


. Sophia E. 


83 


Trevore, William 




[74a 


William 


166 


Treworthy, James 




139 


Thornton, George 


79 


Lucy 




*34 


Susau A. 


79 


Trickey, Annie E. 




84 


Thorpe, J. G. 


54 


Tripp, Lizzie M. 


95. 


217 


Tibbetts, Charles W. 


120 


Winfield S. 


95» 


217 


Hannah C. 


120 


Troy 




102a 


Henry 


120 


True, John W. 




107 


Margaret 


69 


Tuck, Josiah, Margery 


212 


Tobey, Abbie }%. 


95 


Tucker, Elizabeth 




67 


Abigail 


63 


James 




84 


Ciarissa 


82 


John W. 




68 


Edwin F. 


89 


Katherine 




68 


' Ellen A. 


213 


Lizzie M. 




92 


George A. 


89 


Mary E. 




78 


Henry C. 


9 1 


Neilie J. 




92 


Isabel 


62 


William H. 




92 


James 56, 


220 


.Tuckerman, Nath'l 




11 


James S. 


65 


Tuftonboro 


79, : 


James W. 


66 


Tufts, Nathaniel 




^5 


Olive 


58 


Turner, Alpha 




ma 


Polly 


212 


Ellen E. 




93 


Rosan 


82 


Mary 




133 


Samuel 


34 


Thomas 




133 


Sarah A. 


88 


Tuttle, Charles W. 3 


[93a 


207 


Stephen H. 83, 


uoa 


John 


5 


9. 70 


William 


212 


Lydia H. 




69 


William W. 


80 


Sally 




59 


Todd, John F. 


92 


Twombly, Ra-lph 




120 


Torry, William 


186 


Undeihill, John 




182 


Towie, Fannie M. 


88 


United States 




122 


Towne, Cora B. 


97 


Unity 




47 


George A. 


97 


Urch, David 




93 


Tozier, Martha 


149 


Florence 




9* 


Riehard 146 


. 149 


George W. 




98 


Trace, Andrew 


34 


Mary A. 




83 


Trafton, A. C. 


112 


Rosanna S. 




213 


Clark C. 


85 


Valdez, Antonia 




103 


Trask, James H. 


107 


Carmen 




103 


Treadwell, Samuel P. 


77 


Clemencia 




103 



xli. 



Valley Springs, Cal. 


103 


War, 


1812 




7 


Varney, Abigail T. 


63 




Civil 7, 


44. 


117 


Ada S. 


98 




French 


6, 


16a 


Anua 


44 


♦ 


Indian 




5 


Caroline 


90 




King George's 




5 


' David 


94 




King William 


\s 


5 


Dorothy 


9 + 


Warner, N. H. 




102a 


.Elijah 


44. 90 


Warren, Catherine 




58 


Eunice K. 


63 




James 




58 


Jeremiah 


69 




Polly 




77 


John H. 


69 




Samuel N. 




80 


Lucy 75, Ma 


rtha 63 




Sarah 




36 


Phebe 69, Sa 


lly 63 


Warwick, Robert 




[69a 


William 


63, 75 


Washburn, Charles 


F. 


54 


Vaughan 


1 6a 


Waterhouse, Benjamin 


38 


George 


20S 




Daniel 




107 


Joshua 


45 > 94 




Esther 




37 


Susan R. 


45» 9,4 




George 




117 


Vincent, Horace D. 


72 




Joseph 




37^ 


Timothy D. 


72 




Leonard 77 117 


Vines, Gov. 1 


4i» 147 




Lydia 




14a 


Vinton, Horace H. 


83 




Lydia 


S. 


117 


Virginia 40, 194a 


Wate 


rtown 


146 


209 


Wakefield 


59. 218 


Watson, Carrie 




215 


Otis 


70 


Way. 


Elvira M. 




104 


Waldron 


- 187 


Wayl 


and 




94 


* Richard 


43 


Webber, Eliza J. 




213 


Walford 


8 




Temple 


83, 


213 


Jane 


8a 


Wecanacohunt 




187 


Jeremiah 


9 


Weeks, Georgiana 




87 


Martha 


9 




John 




79 


Mary 


9 




Walter N. 




121 


Thomas 


8a 


Welch 


Adeline F. 




9i 


Walbach Tower 


119 




Alice 




62 


Walker, Charles Z. 


103 




Alice A. 




94 


Charles H 


103 




Alfred T. 




211 


Charles W 


80 




Almira 




78 


Glenwood M. 103 


• 


Archelaus T. 




86 


Mary L. 


193 




Annie L. M. 




94 


Sidney H. 


103 




Benjamin 




62 


Wall, James 


208 




Caroline 




82 


Wallingford, Saliy 


62 




Florence A. 




95 


Samuel 


6 




Hannah S. 




213 


Wannerton 


:38a 




Joseph 




58 


Thomas iq 


9a, 208 




Mabel G. 


- 


211 



xlii. 



Welch , — co n tin ucd ; 




Whitehouse, Elisabeth 


82 


Mary 


68 




Elisabeth A. 


116 


Phebe 


58 




Susan 


90 


Sally 


•58 


Whitney, Ellen D. 


90 


Samuel 


158 


Whitta 


ker, William 


1 10a 


Sarah J. 


9i 


Wiggin, Dudley 


65 


Wells, Maine, 40, 66 


. 73. 




Hattie 


95 


85, 


I53a 




Mary D- 


7i 


Wentwortk, Adriana 


80 




Mehitable 


65 


B. C. 


1 ria 




Thomas 126a, 


178a 


James W. 


213 


Wight 


Marcus 


107 


Meribah 


213 


Wilkins, George R. 


107 


Nath.l 


63 


Wilkir 


ison, Abigail 


7i 


Lydia 


63 




Margaret 


&7 


Paul 56 


114 




Mehitable 


69 


Wescott, Charles M. 


213 


Willard, Simon 


I2 5 


Harriet A. 


213 


Willey 


, Charles 


66 


Weston, Thomas 


164a 


• 


Charles A. R. 


213 


Westmoreland, N. H. 


10 1 a 




Dorcas T, 


213 


Westminster. lyng. 205 


, 207 




Frances 


66 


Weymouth, Francis 


74 




Jacob 


70 


Mary E. 


74 




Lydia 


108 


Mehitable 


115 


William 1, 18, 


193 


Richard 


128 


Williams, David 


7i 


Sally 


64 




Francis 


208 


Shadrach 


64 




John 


208 


Mass. 


171a 




Josiah 


57 


Wheelwright, John 


180 




Maria 


57 


Wherren, James 


86 


Willis 


: — 




Jerome S. 


87 




Abbie A. 


102 


Joseph 


59 




Abigail P. 


102 


Lavinia 


59 




Algernon 


102a 


Louisa 


68 




Alis L. 


103a 


Love 


57 




Almanda 


102 


Mary J. 


64 




Anna G. 


103 


Moses 


57 




Annie 


104 


Whidden, Caesar 


62 




Arthur L. 


104 


Jerusha 


62 




Beatrice 0. 


103 


Whipple, William 


136 




Carrie E. 


102 


White, 


165 




Clara G. 


103a 


John 128a 


, 146 




Clemencia 


103 


Joseph 


4i 




Eben M. 


104 


Julia 


65 




Edith G. 


103 


Richard 


182 




Edward S. 


104 


Thomas B. 


65 




Elizabeth G. 


102 



xliii. 



i 






Willis ;— continued : 




Winslow 


T72 


Ellen 


103 


Winnipiseogee 


125a 


Experience 


IOI 


Winter, 


John 


176a 


Fanny 


IOI 


Winthrop, John 


166 


Florence C. 


1 04 




Robert 


166 


Hannah 


IOI 


Witham 


, Abner 


34 


Harlon P. 


102 




Edwin 


34 


Harlon S. 


102 




Eunice 


57 


Harold N. 


102 




Irene D. 


bo 


John 


IOI 




Jane 


75 


John L. M. 2, 


26, 39 




Jeremiah 


34 


102, 119 




Mary 


58 


Lemuel 


101a 




Mary E. 


7i 


Lemuel M. 80, 


101a 




Olive 


66 


Lena V. 


104 




Zebedee 


33 


' Lydia 


IOI 


Withers 


Elizabeth 


147 


Mary B. 


103 




John 


147 


Mary E. 


103a 




Sarah 


147 


Mary L. 


102a 




Thomas 




Nathaniel 


IOI 




124a, 1. 


17. *50 


Otis W. 


102a 


Wiscansett 


8, 16 


Paulina H. 


102 


Wisconsin 


217 


Ruth E. 


103 


Worster 


Dorcas 


57 


Sarah M. 


104 




Frank E. 




Susan A. 


104 




Hannah J. 


70 


Susan L. 


104 




Henrietta F. 


97 


William G. 


103a 




Lydia 


114 


Wilson, Alexander 


72 




Lydia F. 


97 


Anna A. 


84 




Mary 


72 


Deborah 


146 




Nellie M. 


97 


Gowen 128a, 


145a 




Stephen 


114 


Isabella D. 


90 




Thomas 


57 


Johanna 


82 


Woodman, James S. 


213 


Joseph • 


114 




James T. 


79 


Lvdia 


214 




Jotham 


6o, 67 


Obed 


214 




Lois 


59 


Oliver 


93 




Margaret 


67 


Sarah 


93 




Mehitable 


213 


Shipley 


105 




Sarah 


60 


Winchell, Reuben 


66 


Woodwa 


rd, Esther 


64 


Sally 


66 




Lucretia 


58 


Wincoll, John, 128a 


146a 




Reuben 


58 


Mary, Olive 


147 




Samuel 


64 


Windham, Vermont 


101a 


World's 


Crisis 


220 


Winniconsett 


47 




Fair 


32a 



xliv\ 



Woburn 

Wolford, Jeremy 
Thomas 
Wood, Alme 
Woodbury, Charles L, 
Young, John W. 

York Deeds 



117 Wood worth, Emma 

20S Woolaston 

208 Worcester, 

104 54, 120a 

Workman, Betsey 
York, James H. 



88 



93 

189 



58 
84 
192a York Co. 31a, 46, 129, 134 
142, 143,148, 212a 
York, 20, 46, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, 64, 63, 66, 67, 69, 70 
7*> 72, 73> 74» 75'78. 83, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 93 
94, 96, 98, 141, 182. 



QQyf &